merchants and pirate mercenaries in shaping the fortunes of the Malacca Straits and the region’s sultanates; amongst the most noted were the Orang Laut , or People of the Sea, 5 boat dwellers who lived a rootless and nomadic existence from coast to coast, being hired to serve as the sultan’s personal navies, fishermen, traders, and tax collectors. 6 Young’s proposal was

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67

the core principle of each was preserved through the KRNVR and its successor organisation, the Royal East African Navy (REAN). As discussed in the Caribbean, the value of such units became increasingly political and symbolic, as well as strategic, with the Admiralty stressing ‘the importance of encouraging the Colonial Naval Forces so that they may be a

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67
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Quarantine and professional identity in mid nineteenth-century Britain

5 Policing boundaries: quarantine and professional identity in mid nineteenth-century Britain Lisa Rosner Introduction As the British imperial presence spread across the world’s inland seas and oceans from the late eighteenth through the nineteenth centuries, so too did deadly diseases like yellow fever, cholera and dysentery. Management of these diseases invariably created disputes between medical men in Royal Navy ships and those at the ports they visited, over whether specific diseases were communicable and, thus, whether there was any purpose to quarantine

in Mediterranean Quarantines, 1750–1914
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Boyhood, duty and war

Cornwell’, from which proceeds were donated to the newly formed Cornwell Memorial Fund begun by the Navy League. 2 The sombre spectacle included detachments of soldiers and sailors, groups of children, among them eighty of Cornwell’s schoolmates from the Walton Road School, a local group of Naval Cadets, and Cornwell’s old Boy Scout troop as well as its Scoutmaster. The boy’s school headmaster, his former

in From Jack Tar to Union Jack
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their way to a “Far Eastern Munich”’. 8 Lien , or moral conduct, thus held more gravitas for the Chinese population than expressions of Britain’s material supremacy, such as the Navy or finance, which constituted mien-tzu . This also raises a significant parallel within imperial theory and the Gramscian notion of hegemony, whereby

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67

In 1832, a small envelope was sent to the Admiralty in London from the coast of West Africa. Contained inside it was a handful of brown dust, described as the ‘testings’ taken from the timbers of HMS Black Joke . These powdered remnants were all that survived of one of the most famous and successful slave catchers in the history of the Royal Navy

in The suppression of the Atlantic slave trade
Abolition from ship to shore

This study provides fresh perspectives on critical aspects of the British Royal Navy’s suppression of the Atlantic slave trade. It is divided into three sections. The first, Policies, presents a new interpretation of the political framework under which slave-trade suppression was executed. Part II, Practices, examines details of the work of the navy’s West Africa Squadron

in The suppression of the Atlantic slave trade
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context. For the British Empire the issue was intrinsically tied to imperial naval defence, but this has never been analysed at a sub-Dominion level for the twentieth century before. The material strength of the Royal Navy and its ability to defend Britain’s global interests preoccupied the rise of the discourse for contemporaries, most famously in Chamberlain’s ‘weary Titan

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67
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senior service, the Royal Navy did lend support to this local endeavour; two former gunboats, HMS Tweed and HMS Wyvern , were reconditioned for use as training vessels, and a Royal Navy gunner took on the duties of instructor. A requisition order was placed by the Governor to the Commodore at Hong Kong for ‘boats, signal books, signal flags and cones for the use of the Aux

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67

. Hitler was reported as stating that ‘He would provide the entire German navy for that purpose, except that he would not subject it to the risk of attack.’22 Returning to the pre-history of the Empire Windrush as the Monte Rosa, she was used briefly during the war, alongside the Donau and the Gotenland, to transport Jews from Norway to their eventual destination of Auschwitz. Some 760 Jews were deported from Norway by ship and only 25 survived. The Monte Rosa took 21 Jewish deportees on 20 November 1942 and a further 27 six days later.23 Overall, however, sea

in The battle of Britishness