Search Results

Abstract only

Chris Abel

meaning of place-identity as interpreted from different viewpoints, including those of ordinary home-dwellers, academics, literary figures and architectural critics and theorists. The marked differences in the meanings attached to spaces and places by both inhabitants and observers lead in turn to a discussion of cultural relativism, as argued by prominent linguists and anthropologists. The early influence of Martin Heidegger’s phenomenology on the idea of place in architectural theory is also discussed, paving the way for an overview of related approaches by later

Abstract only

Wes Sharrock and Graham Button

below). We argue that the structure-and-agency debate cannot reach a conclusion because it is based upon a tendentious interpretation of the history and problematic of sociological theories. In particular, the assumption that prior theories can be simply and crudely divided between either agency or structure is false. In particular, contemporary arguments distort the characteristics of the relevant theories associated with ‘agency’ – such as methodological individualism, interactionism and phenomenologies – as well as crucial arguments in Marx, Durkheim and Parsons

Abstract only

Eva Woods Peiró

windows and signs, a practice Walter Benjamin defined as flânerie (2007: 36–​7). Benjamin’s attempt to understand a new phenomenology of vision enabled by mass reproduction was premediated in the textual medium of film magazines, in particular those published after 1910 and the inception of full-​length narrative film. Yet several years before Benjamin’s 1936 essay on mechanical reproduction, in magazines such as Cine Popular, Cinegramas, Fotogramas and La Pantalla, to name only a few, we find a running commentary on the same technological shifts that concerned Benjamin

Abstract only

Thinking through feeling

Critical theory and the affective turn

Series:

Simon Mussell

describes this technique well when he writes of the ‘combined research into objective tendency and subjective intention’, which taken together constitute the ‘cold’ and ‘warm’ streams of a critical Marxism.15 In following this method, the Frankfurt School situates itself in opposition to both the excessively doctrinaire approaches of Marxism in its Second and Third International form,16 and the politically deficient subjectivism represented by phenomenology and existentialism. The task for a critical theory of society, then, is to effectively mediate objectivity and

Abstract only

Law in popular belief

Myth and reality

Edited by: Anthony Amatrudo and Regina Rauxloh

In recent years there has been a significant growth in interest of the so-called “law in context” extending legal studies beyond black letter law. This book looks at the relationship between written law and legal practice. It examines how law is applied in reality and more precisely how law is perceived by the general public in contrast to the legal profession. The authors look at a number of themes that are central to examining ways in which myths about law are formed, and how there is inevitably a constitutive power aspect to this myth making. At the same time they explore to what extent law itself creates and sustains myths. This line of enquiry is taken from a wide range of viewpoints and thus offers a unique approach to the question of relationship between theory and practice. The book critically assesses the public’s level of legal, psychological and social awareness in relation to their knowledge of law and deviant behaviour. This line of enquiry is taken from a wide range of viewpoints and thus offers a unique approach to the question of relationship between theory and practice. The book covers both empirical studies and theoretical engagements in the area of legal understanding and this affords a very comprehensive coverage of the area, and addressing issues of gender and class, as well as considering psychological material. It brings together a range of academics and practitioners and asks questions and address contemporary issues relating to the relationship between law and popular beliefs.

Abstract only

Dafydd W. Jones

those who wish to pass as such, which is exactly the same thing’30 – and we might easily revise the title of the 1909 article as ‘to be or not to be … a boxer, an elephant, anything’. Significant emphasis is placed on appearance – either of the American, in this instance, or of the boxer – a critical emphasis to step 76 The fictions of Arthur Cravan away from phenomena (and, for Deleuze, from phenomenology) as presenting appearances of worlds, possessing essences or foundations behind them, and towards simulation and Deleuze’s sense of simulacra as appearances in

Abstract only

Series:

Alberto Fernández Carbajal

This book explores representations of queer migrant Muslims in international literature and film from the 1980s to the present. It brings together a variety of contemporary writers and filmmakers of Muslim heritage engaged in vindicating same-sex desire from several Western locations. The book approaches queer Muslims as figures forced to negotiate their identities according to the expectations of the West and of their migrant Muslim communities. It coins the concept of queer micropolitical disorientation via the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Sara Ahmed and Gayatri Gopinath. The author argues that depictions of queer Muslims in the West disorganise the social categories that make up contemporary Western societies. The study covers three main themes: queer desire across racial and national borders; Islamic femininities and masculinities; and the queer Muslim self in time and place. These thematic clusters examine the nuances of artistic depictions of queer Muslims’ mundane challenges to Western Islamophobia and Islamicate heteronormativity. Written in a scholarly but accessible style, this is a timely contribution to the controversial topic of Islam and homosexuality, forging understanding about the dissident position of Muslims who contravene heteronormative values and their equivocal political position in the West.

Abstract only

Bridie Andrews

words, having observed shifts in the epistemology of body-knowledge in China, this chapter will explore whether such shifts also generated a change in the lived experience (or phenomenology) of the body. Blood in the canonical medical literature Literate physicians in imperial China found it natural to ground their understandings of the body in canonical works such as the Yellow Emperor’s Inner Canon (黃帝內經). This compilation of Han Dynasty (206 BCE–220 CE) texts (and a few earlier and later) explains the body, in health and disease, as part of the cosmological order

Abstract only

Of interethnic (dis)connection

Queer phenomenology, and cultural and religious commodifi cation in Hanif Kureishi’s My Beautiful Laundrette (1985) and The Buddha of Suburbia (1990)

Series:

Alberto Fernández Carbajal

phenomenology, especially regarding the confusion experienced by diasporic bodies and its relation to their surroundings. Ahmed observes that ‘bodies that experience being out of place might need to be orientated , to find a place where they feel comfortable and safe in the world’ ( 2006 , p. 158, emphasis added). P OWDERS , the revamped laundrette, is such a place of relative safety, where Omar can forge an affective connection with Johnny, albeit not without political complications. Disorientation and reorientation of the British Muslim subject of diasporic heritage is not

Abstract only

Deborah Martin

Since the release of her debut feature, La ciénaga, in 2001, Argentine director Lucrecia Martel has gained worldwide recognition for her richly allusive, elliptical and sensorial film-making. The first monograph on her work, The Cinema of Lucrecia Martel analyses her three feature films, which also include La niña santa (2004) and La mujer sin cabeza (2008), alongside the unstudied short films Nueva Argirópolis (2010), Pescados (2010) and Muta (2011). It examines the place of Martel’s work within the experimental turn taken by Argentine cinema in the late 1990s and early 2000s, a trend of which Martel is often described as a major player, yet also explores correspondences between her work and other national and global filmmaking trends, including the horror genre, and classic Hollywood. It brings together the rich and diverse critical approaches which have been taken in the analysis of Martel’s work – including feminist and queer approaches, political readings and phenomenology – and proposes new ways of understanding her films, in particular through their figuring of desire as revolutionary, their use of the child’s perspective, and their address to the senses and perception, which it argues serve to renew cinematic language and thought.