Search results

Exploring the real-time smart city dashboard

basis of their ontological, epistemological and political assumptions. On the one hand, dashboards may open up data to public consumption and use, yet on the other hand they cultivate a top-down, technocratic vision (Ciuccarelli, Lupi and Simeone, 2014: Mattern, 2015). Real-time mapping and dashboards provide a powerful realist epistemology (Kitchin, Lauriault and McArdle, 2015a; Mattern, 2015). An issue is the validity of the data. Mattern notes that the target 242 (In)formalising audience ‘likely has only a limited understanding of how the data are derived’ yet

in Time for mapping
Considerations and consequences

the ideological precepts by which they are informed and conditioned. Especially in an age of geographic information systems – wherein lies an increasingly stark disparity between the visual appearance of the map itself on one hand, and the numerical data that it claims to represent on the other – the parameters within which such representations are given, and the socio-political consequences of such ‘givenness’ must be analysed with intense scrutiny. Digital mapping gives us a world through the binding of quantitative information to a set of representational

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
The restructuring of work and production in the international political economy

5 The ‘contested’ firm: the restructuring of work and production in the international political economy no involuntary changes have ever spontaneously restructured or reorganised a mode of production; … changes in productive relationships are experienced in social and cultural life, refracted in men’s ideas and their values, and argued through in their actions, their choices and their beliefs. (Thompson, 1976/1994: 222) T he desire to comprehend, order and manage the dual dynamics of globalisation and restructuring has led to much attention being paid to the

in Globalisation contested
Ireland’s grassroots food growing movement

, the rural idyll’ (Leapman, 2010). Growing your own food has become a practice by those seeking something better and different from their food, environment and society. Grassroots food initiatives, such as community gardens and allotments, have long been recognised as spaces outside of, and challenging to, conventional political and economic structures. Rather than relying on conventional economic exchange, local resources are mobilised, labour is communal and materials are shared. In the US and UK, increases in demand for urban food growing spaces have been linked

in Spacing Ireland
Abstract only
Spaces and spectres of Ireland after NAMA

sustainable residential property taxes, were financed from the accrual of development levies. Furthermore, the balanced spatial development advocated by the National Spatial Strategy (NSS) (Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government, 2002) was consistently undermined by local politicians, many of whom had a vested interest in the property market and excessively zoned land for development (O’Toole, 2009). Within this taxation and political system, there was a predilection for development. Added to these factors was the involvement of the domestic banking

in Spacing Ireland
Art and the temporalities of geomedia

”’ rather than its wholeness as a ‘natural’ image’ of an object (Dorrian, 2013: 299). Unlike Wood, Dorrian sees 146 Stitching memories a significant ­difference between the cloud-swirled blue marbles of the Apollo photographs and the cloudless, eternal day of mosaicked satellite imagery; he argues that these patchwork worlds are a new kind of political map where differing resolutions and image upload frequencies speak more of Western political, security and economic interests, wherever they may lie, than they do of the bounded territories of nation-states. Regardless

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Back to the future

places as against spaces. Places, in these stitchings, become holders for memory, moments or rhythms, that might be recombined in a reflective story of mapping with particular and unique resonances. To look at these kinds of practices through a temporal lens does not so much obliterate spatiality, but instead alters the analysis beyond modern conceptions, shifting to a more hybrid understanding of tempo-spatial translations. There is nothing inevitable about flow, and rich place-based analyses are needed to explore how the politics of placeholding emerges in a

in Time for mapping

Ronfeldt (1998) have conceptualised the growing use by political actors of CMC as being part of a ‘social netwar’. They describe how actors can use CMC to target important nodes in networks (such as governments or multinationals) with a strength beyond their numerical capacity and initiate information campaigns, or ‘hacktivism’, to highlight their Electronic tactics and alternative media 119 causes. In response, they argue that CMC facilitates those who organise non-hierarchically, and thus in order to be prepared for information warfare they urge governments to adapt

in Cyberprotest
Abstract only
Why gardening has limited success growing inclusive communities

-​Tanaka and Krasny, 2004), allowing projects to secure public funding. But community-​focused strategies have been criticised as inadequate solutions to poverty and inequality, micro-​scale action on macro-​injustices. If global political-​economic processes cause injustice, situating solutions at the community level cannot address its roots in state and capitalism (Amin, 2005). If community action has limited impact on problems not caused by community-​level processes, gardens may also have limited effects on injustice. Critical perspectives on urban gardens question their

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice

future Creating a more liveable city as an integral part of the development of a better urban society will take a reassessment of the connections between existing social and political structures and the social relationships that they help to produce. Given the scale of impact of the economic downturn and its connection to the built environment, any rethinking of urban life must have at its centre a belief in achieving a more equitable society. Picking up on ideas such as the ‘just city’ (Fainstein, 2010) or the ‘right to the city’ (Harvey, 2008; Lefebvre, 1968), it is

in Spacing Ireland