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  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
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regarded as a normal and suitable weapon for enforcing the just demands of government. Philip Game (the AOC India), 18 October 1923. 1 In our time, political speech and writing are largely the defence of the indefensible. Things like the continuance of

in Air power and colonial control

the region, as well as the headquartering, particularly during the Second World War, of strategic communications. The British were reluctant to jeopardise this and had had their fingers badly burned in their one and only attempt to do so – in the proposed Federation of 1876. It was the crown colonies – Jamaica, Trinidad – which caused the Imperial headaches, for they provided the political context in

in Empire and nation-building in the Caribbean

Chronology: Britain The Chartist movement, stretching from the 1830s to the 1850s, may be seen as the first national exercise in independent working-class politics of a ‘mass’ kind in modern Britain. 1 From the demise of Chartism to the end of the century the institutions of the labour movement characteristically supported the radical wing of the Liberal Party and the election of ‘Lib-Lab’ working-class trade union candidates to parliament. ‘Lib-Labism’ was particularly strong among

in Labour and the politics of Empire

respective national contexts and some interest in their ‘third way’ politics, 1 there has not appeared a comparative book-length study of the kind undertaken here. 2 Concern also rests with the neglected trans-national dimension. The latter has manifested itself in important, but variable, personal, institutional and ideological connections, exchanges and mutual influences between the Australian and British labour movements during the chosen period. The aims of my study are to fill gaps in the literature and, more

in Labour and the politics of Empire
Abstract only

Australia Overview I suggested in the Introduction to Part IV that the politics of Cold War loyalism both dominated Australian society for twenty-years from the later 1940s and constitute a large part of the explanation for the ALP ’s political weakness, particularly at the federal level, and the hegemony of the Right during this period of time. I maintained further that, while recognised in parts of the relevant literature, 1 these broad claims have not

in Labour and the politics of Empire

the future conduct of the war effort. The failure of the conscription referenda in 1916 and 1917 was accompanied by the irrevocable and disastrous split in the ALP and the mainly enforced departure from the party of pro-conscription and pro-British leaders such as ‘Billy’ Hughes. There subsequently occurred a fundamental realignment in Australian politics, with ex- ALP ers and anti-Labor figures coming together in the Nationalist Party, formed in 1917, in order to ‘Win the War’. In turn, during the following

in Labour and the politics of Empire

‘modernisation’ of both the ALP and Australian society from the ‘modernising’ social, scientific and technological ‘revolution’ of Harold Wilson in Britain. 3 Fabianism also spread from Britain to Australia. In the post-war years Fabian societies were established in all the Australian state capitals and Fabian philosophy became ‘an expression of middle-class political mobilization in urban centres across the nation’. Australian Fabians sought, with limited results, to challenge the ‘anti-intellectualism’ of the ALP . 4 The

in Labour and the politics of Empire
Abstract only

The key argument presented in this book is that the neglected forces of nation, empire and race exerted a far more profound influence upon Labour politics in Britain and Australia between 1900 and 2010 than is suggested in the relevant literature. To be sure, this influence varied in time and place and was generally more pronounced in the Australian than the British case. This was mainly because the imprint of Britain, as the ruling imperial power and ‘mother country’, upon Australia and its labour movement was

in Labour and the politics of Empire

Howard to Gillard The ALP ’s search for domestic success and for inspiration overseas from the triumphant Blairites proved, however, to be fruitless. Between his victory over Keating in 1996 and his defeat by Rudd in 2007, it was the coalition’s John Howard who continuously ruled the federal political roost. Having won in 1996 on his programme of stability, moderation and an appeal to the nation ‘as a whole’, Howard and his coalition partners increasingly displayed their true

in Labour and the politics of Empire
English government and the empire, 1667-1679
Robert M. Bliss

In 1667, one of the impeachment charges against Clarendon was that he had ‘introduced an arbitrary government in the … plantations’. Restoration bills of impeachment are not notable for their accuracy, and this item has an almost surreal quality about it, but its underlying assumption is noteworthy. If Clarendon was to be guilty of autocracy in English politics, it stood

in Revolution and empire