Fighting masculinity on the Russian punk scene

-1‘If you want to live, you better know how to fight’: fighting masculinity on the Russian punk scene -Hilary Pilkington- The discussion of masculinity and femininity on punk scenes is a relatively recent phenomenon.1 The emphasis in published work to date has been on reclaiming young women’s experience and practice; driven, in part, by their increasing visibility thanks to the emergence of the Riot Grrrl scene in the 1990s. The broad consensus reached might be encapsulated in LeBlanc’s conclusion that ‘gender is problematic for punk girls in a way that it is

in Fight back
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Discourses of normality and denormalisation in German punk lyrics

13 Normality kills: discourses of normality and denormalisation in German punk lyrics Melani Schröter Punk and normality seem mutually exclusive; whoever is normal cannot be a punk, and whoever is a punk cannot be normal. Debates regarding the demarcation between ‘real’ and ‘fake’ punk(s) can be boiled down to a question of true deviation (essentially not normal) versus mere imitation (disguised as not normal). Because punk defies normality, being a punk is not easy. Firstly, denormalisation involves risk, e.g. psychological disintegration, marginalisation

in Fight back
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Michael Derek Elworthy Jarman as a true 'Renaissance Man' in the colloquial sense of the word, as well as having a strong and permanent interest in the art, thought, and literature of the Renaissance. Although the tone of Jarman's films is frequently melancholic, the threat which death poses for desire is sometimes modulated by an apparent desire for death. He was never comfortable with the label 'gay', regarding it as both too stable and too self-satisfied, too concerned to present a 'positive' image. He preferred the more fluid and mobile term 'queer'. Jarman's first feature-length film was remarkable in many ways and in at least three respects was virtually unique at the time for a commercially distributed picture. In 1977, the year of the Queen's Silver Jubilee, punk had spread beyond a handful of clubs and bands in London and New York and was starting to look like a complete new youth culture in the making. From 1978 to 1985, whatever else he was engaged in, Jarman's life was dominated by his desire to make a film about the life of the Italian painter Caravaggio. Wittgenstein had been a completely unexpected commission which Jarman, despite his failing health, had rapidly and brilliantly converted into 'A Derek Jarman Film' through his usual intense personal identification with his subject. Blue was one of a cluster of films addressing the issue of AIDS which were released in the early 1990s.

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East German punk in its social, political and historical context

10 Ostpunx: East German punk in its social, political and historical context Aimar Ventsel The availability of ‘cultural and social means’ is an obfuscating expression. In plain German, it should be put [as follows]: those who only have ‘small cultural and social means’ (to use politically-correct EU speak) are not sufficiently intelligent, educated or stable in their behaviour. Defined in this way by the EU, the poor are disburdened of responsibility for their situation and relieved of the moral pressure to try to alter it.1 The citation above comes from

in Fight back
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Adventures in reality: why (punk) fanzines matter

Introduction: adventures in reality: why (punk) fanzines matter Matthew Worley, Keith Gildart, Anna Gough-Yates, Sian Lincoln, Bill Osgerby, Lucy Robinson, John Street, Pete Webb I’m scribbling this down at work so I can’t let the prose flow but I couldn’t care. There’s only one way to defeat the two evils (boring established groups & straight record shops) and that is to ignore them completely. Tony D., Ripped & Torn, no. 1 (1976) It may seem strange that something so ephemeral should warrant historical attention. Typically made with wilful irreverence and

in Ripped, torn and cut
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Positive punk

13 Kick: positive punk Richard Cabut In the autumn of 1982, I was living in a punk squat in New North Road, London, N1, a walk from Old Street, unreconstructed and sort of scary/lairy at that time. On one occasion I was mugged for 26½ pence; all I had in my pocket and pretty much all I had in the world. I was on the dole and spent my time conducting a fruitful lifestyle based on what I described in my fanzine Kick as ‘creativity, individuality and rebellion’.1 Kick 4 had been published at the end of that summer and had attracted a fair amount of attention from

in Ripped, torn and cut
The relational character of subcultural ideology in the case ofCzech punks and skinheads

9 Shared enemies, shared friends: the relational character of subcultural ideology in the case of Czech punks and skinheads ˘ Hedvika Novotná and Martin Hermanský Punk in Czechoslovakia began to form prior to 1989, in a society substantially removed from that in which it had first been born. In other words, punk was imported into a Czechoslovakian society that was determined by a political system that claimed to be socialistic, was aligned to the idea of communism, and whose primary characteristics (regardless of the name) were built on repression, fear and

in Fight back
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The role of women in punk fanzine creation

4 Invisible women: the role of women in punk fanzine creation Cazz Blase The role of women and girls in the creation of 1970s punk fanzines is largely unacknowledged. Because this area of punk fanzine research is so underdeveloped, this chapter will be situated within a much longer time period than is usual, beginning both pre-punk and pre-1970s. This is in order to reflect the contribution women have made towards independent printing and publishing from the nineteenth century onwards. There are a number of of key moments of pre-punk agitation in print that have

in Ripped, torn and cut

6 The evolution of the London network In the previous chapter I argued that London’s punk world was the effect of interaction and collective effervescence within a critical and connected mass of underground music enthusiasts. In this chapter I track the evolution of this world and the network which underpinned it. I investigate the formation of ties between pioneer punks, the emergence of punk’s stylistic conventions and the broader relational dynamics and division of labour between protagonists. The main body of the chapter comprises a narrative account

in Networks of sound, style and subversion
City Fun and the politics of post-punk

5 ‘Pam ponders Paul Morley’s cat’: City Fun and the politics of post-punk David Wilkinson Manchester’s City Fun (1978–83) bears all the hallmarks of punk fanzine media. Early issues in particular feature impulsive anti-authoritarian rants alongside reviews and ruminations on the meaning of punk. City Fun’s often striking covers varied in style, though Dada-indebted collages by Linder Sterling and Jon Savage captured a distinctively post-punk structure of feeling; one riven by the crisis of the political conjuncture, which nevertheless offered glimpses of utopia

in Ripped, torn and cut