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The Clash as my ‘true fiction’
Martin James

144 THE CULTURAL POLITICS OF PUNK 7 ‘The beautiful people are ugly too’: The Clash as my ‘true fiction’ Martin James When, in late 1999, The Clash released their post-split live album From Here to Eternity and previewed Don Letts’s documentary film devoted to them, Westway to the World, the media were invited to a launch party at a private members’ club in West London1 where music critics and record label personnel rubbed shoulders with celebrities, musicians and supermodels. The event offered a clear indication of the huge gulf that existed between the band

in Working for the clampdown
Indie pop, fanzines and punk rock
Pete Dales

9 Are you scared to get punky? Indie pop, fanzines and punk rock Pete Dale This chapter will argue that fanzines played a crucial role in the formation of a perceived genre (or, arguably, sub-genre) called, variously, indie pop, cutie, C86, twee, jangle-pop, shambling or anorak. For the purpose of discussion in this chapter, the scene in question is referred to as ‘1980s indie pop’ or just ‘indie pop’. In the twenty-first century, the descriptor ‘indie pop’ is sometimes applied, in vernacular contexts, to post-1980s ‘indie’ music which is qualitatively and

in Ripped, torn and cut
Abstract only
Nick Crossley

2 Music worlds In the previous chapter I suggested that punk and post-punk are best conceived, for sociological purposes, as ‘music worlds’, a concept I  adapt from Howard Becker’s notion of ‘art worlds’ (1951, 1963, 1974, 1976, 1982, 1995, 2004, 2006a, 2006b; Faulkner and Becker 2009; see also Bottero and Crossley 2011; Finnegan 1989; Lopes 2002; Martin 1995, 2005, 2006a, 2006b). In this chapter I elaborate upon this concept. Before I do, however, I briefly review three alternative conceptions, explaining why I have chosen ‘music worlds’ over them. As much

in Networks of sound, style and subversion
Whatever happened to the new bohemia?
Steve Redhead

 93 4 One nation under a hoof: whatever happened to the new bohemia? At least since the punk era of the mid-​late 1970s, the notion of ‘independent’ has for better or worse come to signify ‘underground’, notwithstanding Neighbours television show star Kylie Minogue’s late 1980s successes. Punk, and its aftermath, was a highpoint of the sales, though not necessarily the influence, of independent records in the industry. John Peel, the disc jockey most responsible for promoting independent music in British public service broadcasting over the past twenty years

in The end-of-the-century party
The transgressive zine culture of industrial music in the 1970s and 1980s
Benjamin Bland

8 ‘Don’t do as you’re told, do as you think’: the transgressive zine culture of industrial music in the 1970s and 1980s Benjamin Bland Of all the musical subgenres that emerged in the immediate post-punk era, industrial may be seen as that which most readily transcended the traditional confines of a musical movement. Industrial stood out as a result of its strong focus on aesthetics and ideas, even in a musical landscape that was widely concerned with rejecting tradition and which interpreted ‘punk as an imperative to constant change’.1 S. Alexander Reed

in Ripped, torn and cut
My life in fanzines
Clare Wadd

was always about being part of something. We took the inclusive anyone-can-do-it ethos of punk rock and fanzines into running what was ultimately a very successful record label, and which operated and supported us for eight years. We priced records cheaply, crammed lots of tracks on, didn’t do limited editions or special versions, and exchanged huge numbers of letters with our record-buying public – many of whom also wrote fanzines, ran record labels, were in bands, or otherwise part of this whole thing. The whole point was that there was no divide between us as

in Ripped, torn and cut
Against the corporate voice
Caroline Coon

that I consciously wrote about as the punk movement in the summer of 1976 were unskilled or musically unambitious or playing ‘dumb’. Of the musicians in the first British ‘punk’ groups I mentioned in the various strands of my punk narrative – the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned – most of them were as musically accomplished and ambitious as it is possible for teenagers to be. Others, like Johnny Rotten and Paul Simonon, were culturally educated and aware art students. What I saw and heard in these young musicians was what I had been schooled to recognise

in Working for the clampdown
Abstract only
Popular song in the films of Pedro Almodóvar
Eric M. Thau

Since his films were first analysed in the early 1980s, Pedro Almodóvar’s use of music has been duly noted as an essential element of his filmic vision. Indeed, his intimate, even emblematic participation in la movida , Madrid’s countercultural liberal arts movement of the late 1970s, signalled the close association between music and a punk/kitsch attitude toward cultural markers of all kinds

in Screening songs in Hispanic and Lusophone cinema
Critical mass, collective effervescence, social networks and social space
Nick Crossley

4 Theorising micro-mobilisation: critical mass, collective effervescence, social networks and social space In the previous chapter I suggested that whatever strains, inspirations, opportunities and personalities may have played a role in punk’s emergence, a full explanation must focus upon its micro-mobilisation context. In this chapter I take a first step towards doing this by outlining a theory of micro-mobilisation which, I will argue in the next chapter, explains the emergence of punk in London between late 1975 and the end of 1976. My argument is that

in Networks of sound, style and subversion
Abstract only
Post-punk worlds as networks
Nick Crossley

9 Joining the dots: post-punk worlds as networks In the previous chapter I introduced the post-punk worlds of Manchester, Liverpool and Sheffield, as they were in the final years of the 1970s, and I offered a preliminary analysis of them. In the present chapter I develop this analysis by way of an examination of their formal network properties (most of whose definitions were introduced in earlier chapters, especially Chapters 1 and 5). The analysis is motivated by a number of key concerns. First, I want to see how well my earlier arguments regarding the

in Networks of sound, style and subversion