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Julie Thorpe

the Catholic Congress might have been more interested in the special events for women than the missing Germans. A women’s public meeting was held in Vienna’s Concert Hall on the Saturday evening on the third day of the Congress. Alma Motzko (1887–1968), academic, member of the Vienna city council and leader of the Catholic Women’s Organization for the archdiocese of Vienna, gave the keynote address. The following Monday members of the Catholic women’s movement were invited to hear a lecture by another female politician, Emma Kapral (1877–1969), a former Christian

in Pan-Germanism and the Austrofascist state, 1933–38
Post-war planning and the post-war years
Caitríona Beaumont

of Dwellings Committee, the views of Catholic women were reflected in the evidence given by the National Board of Catholic Women (NBCW). This organisation, which represented a number of Catholic women’s groups, focused on the housing needs of families. With regard to the design of local authority housing it was argued houses with a large kitchen-living room, scullery and small parlour were best. Mindful of the needs of families, three-bedroom houses were required to allow parents, boys and girls to sleep separately with separate beds for each child. It was also

in Housewives and citizens
Maternity care, social welfare benefits and family allowances
Caitríona Beaumont

recommending maternity services to Catholic women. In opposing birth control and abortion, the CWL recognised that it had a particular responsibility to speak out for the rights of women, married or unmarried, who became mothers and to ensure that they received the care they required. The MU also encouraged its members to seek medical advice during pregnancy. In 1936, readers of The Mothers’ Union Journal were advised that expectant mothers ‘can be greatly helped by all that modern science has taught us about infant and child welfare and she will no doubt gladly avail

in Housewives and citizens
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

1643. In 1650, the sisters left Heworth and entered their convent in Paris. In 1669, Frances Bedingfield refounded the Institute of Mary temporarily in London until permanent accommodation was found in Hammersmith, but by 1795 the last member of this community had died. Frances Bedingfield founded a second house in Dolebank in 1677; this relocated to York in 1686 and is still in existence today. Susan O’Brien, ‘A Survey of Research and Writing about Roman Catholic Women’s Congregations in Great Britain and Ireland’, in Jan De Maeyer, Sophie Leplaie and Joachim

in Contested identities
Laura Kelly

Ladies’ Collegiate School, Belfast (1859), Victoria College (1887) and Alexandra College (1866). These schools were crucial in spearheading the Irish women’s higher education movement.14 The school magazine of Alexandra College often drew attention to the achievements of former pupils in the medical profession, while also providing articles to educate girls on possibilities for them in the pro­fessions.15 Catholic women’s colleges emerged from the 1880s in response to the growing demands of Catholic women for higher education in a Catholic setting. The main teaching

in Irish women in medicine, c.1880s–1920s
Abstract only
S. Karly Kehoe

Overall, and unfortunately, scholars have been reluctant to engage with the agency of Catholic women. While Bernard Aspinwall, who is a prolific and influential scholar of Catholic history in Scotland, acknowledges their work in some of his writings, other scholars of religious history such as Brown ignore them entirely. Given Brown’s more Introduction 13 recent attempts to incorporate a gendered analysis, for example in The Death of Christian Britain, it is disappointing that women religious were overlooked. Much of the work done on women religious in Scotland to

in Creating a Scottish Church
Devotion, association and community
S. Karly Kehoe

Maitland of Lethington, and John Leslie. Crafted by William Birnie Rhind in 1896, these carvings were commissioned by a committee of bourgeois Catholic Edinburgh women. Both the fundraising campaign and the statues were viewed as significant accomplishments for Scotland’s Catholic women and for British Catholics in general, and yet the work that women did for the church behind the scenes and the public role that many were beginning to assume as the twentieth century dawned did not 166 Creating a Scottish Church translate into equality.49 When Archbishop Eyre addressed

in Creating a Scottish Church
Prostitutes and prostitution
Leanne McCormick

who entered the workhouse classed as prostitutes were Catholic: Table 1.1 Percentage of Catholic women who entered Belfast Union recorded as prostitutes Year % Catholic 1903 1905 1907 1909 1911 1913 60 63 54 51 63 53 Source: Belfast Board of Guardians, Indoor Relief Registers, 1903–1913 While this was, in some years, a relatively small majority, it must be noted that the percentage of the total population in Belfast who were Catholic was less than twenty-five between 1901 and 1926.17 Therefore, the number of Catholic women who entered the workhouse and were

in Regulating sexuality
Elizabeth C. Macknight

because of the symbolic patrimony being offered at ‘an exorbitant price’ but the outcome was different. In 1877 the marquis Ripert d’Alauzier was on diplomatic posting abroad when he received a letter from a group of Catholic women in the town of Seyne (Alpes de Haute Provence). The women had formed a charity association to raise funds for construction of a small chapel as a local Sacred Heart monument overlooking the valley. Seyne was also the name of the canton in which were located ruins of the château de Monclar, a former property of the house of Ripert. Although

in Nobility and patrimony in modern France
Abstract only
Caitríona Beaumont

the five voluntary women’s organisations included in this study, the MU, Catholic Women’s League (CWL), National Council of Women (NCW), WI and National Union of Townswomen’s Guilds (TG), never questioned traditional gender roles, nor did they ever envisage themselves as feminist throughout the years 1928–64. It would be wrong therefore to attempt to reconceptualise these groups so that they take on a more recognisable feminist identity. It would be equally misconceived to alter our understanding of feminist theory and the concept of patriarchy in order to secure a

in Housewives and citizens