War and protest

5 Active citizenship for women: war and protest T he involvement of the MU, CWL, NCW, WI and TG in highlighting the welfare needs of housewives and mothers throughout the 1930s and 1940s has shown that these organisations were able to influence social policy and did so through their effective mobilisation of women as active citizens. The five did not limit themselves, however, to issues relating to social welfare. They also envisaged a role for women in a number of other key campaigns that came to public attention during these years. Three campaigns will be

in Housewives and citizens
Educational theory and the teaching of history

education and enlightened patriotism: ‘to trace the progress of the nation in political and personal liberty’; ‘to trace the development of the social condition of the people’; ‘to teach the love of all that is noble’; ‘to lay the foundation for a knowledge of the rights and duties of citizenship’; ‘to foster love of country’; and, ‘to exercise the powers of judgement, comparison and

in Citizenship, Nation, Empire
Internationalist education between the wars

4 Training for world citizenship: internationalist education between the wars It is undoubtedly true that a remarkable growth of interest in the study of international relations at each level of education has sprung from the circumstances and the ideas of the post-war period. The deep emotional and intellectual impression left by the War and its aftermath has created an unwonted desire to take stock of the conditions of the modern world, and to grapple with the new problems of social conduct and organisation to which the changes of the last one hundred and fifty

in The British people and the League of Nations
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An act of queering citizenship

1 Reading: an act of queering citizenship The very idea of queering citizenship can be confounding. In an essay entitled ‘Queer Citizenship/​ Queer Representation: Politics Out of Bounds?’ Kathleen B. Jones and Sue Dunlap investigate the idea of what they call queer citizenship, based on ‘the building of a different kind of democratic community’ as one they are unable to define or pin down.1 In exploring US and Canadian literary texts that reflect on the limitations of contemporary understandings of citizenship, this book posits a queering of citizenship using

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship
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Why queer(y) citizenship?

Introduction: why queer(y) citizenship? In Thomas King’s 1993 short story, ‘Borders’, readers follow an Indigenous woman and her son as they set off from their home on the reserve and attempt to cross the Canada–​US border that cuts across the 49th parallel. The US border guard does not allow them to cross into the United States because the mother declares their citizenship as Blackfoot and not ‘Canadian’ or ‘American’. The pair attempt to return and are not allowed to cross into Canada for the same reason.1 Despite attempts by border guards on both sides to

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship

5 The antianaesthetic and ‘a community of readers’ in Erín Moure’s O Cidadán Each of the previous chapters has discussed how the work of a ‘peripheral person’ can be mobilised to push readers to blur the boundaries of the status and performance of citizenship, enacting a queering of the concept. I have explored how Anzaldúa and Allison create alternative queer communities of belonging, while Scofield and Gómez-​ Peña use, among other strategies, synecdoche as a device to position the reader as occupying the place of the ‘other’ (whether singular or plural

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship
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Yann Martel’s lonely book club

drawn from the author’s ‘What is Stephen Harper Reading?’ project. 174 Crossing borders and queering citizenship If the authors and works discussed in previous chapters may have at times seemed to deal with the civic act of reading more figuratively, this chapter offers an exploration of a concrete way that reading can function as a civic act in what I have called the queering of citizenship. Where the writing of Gloria Anzaldúa and Dorothy Allison theorises abstract or fictional spaces of queer belonging, Gregory Scofield’s and Guillermo Gómez-​Peña’s poetry and

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship

3 Métis and two-​spirit vernaculars in the writing of Gregory Scofield Writing from the peripheral positions of hybridity at the US–​Mexico borderlands and white poverty in the United States, Gloria Anzaldúa and Dorothy Allison’s feminist autobiographical acts offer readers models for intersectional queer communities of belonging beyond the bounds of state citizenship. Across the 49th parallel, Canadian Métis poet Gregory Scofield similarly disrupts the relationship between the status and performance of citizenship, writing poetry that calls the notion of

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship

4 Performing the border and queer rasquachismo in Guillermo Gómez-​Peña’s performance art Where Gregory Scofield’s negotiation of the practice and habitus of citizenship in Canada is focused on the Métis, a group whose rights and identity have been debated and unjustly dismissed for centuries, this chapter recrosses the 49th parallel and returns to the border between the United States and Mexico, the site that features most prominently in work by Mexican-​ American and self-​ identifying Chicano performance artist and cultural theorist Guillermo Gómez-​ Peña

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship

literature.3 36 Crossing borders and queering citizenship Gloria Anzaldúa and Dorothy Allison’s writing in many ways anticipates the work of Scofield, Gómez-​Peña, Moure, Díaz, and Martel, and serves, among other functions, as a reminder of the long-​ standing importance of treating reading as a civic act of queering citizenship. As I note in the Introduction, Anzaldúa’s work in Borderlands/​La Frontera: The New Mestiza (1987) galvanised the field of border studies, and she is read most often for Chicana nationalist and queer feminist engagement with the US

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship