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Sound, signification and materiality
Andy Birtwistle

cinesonic, rather than issues of film genre, the book purposefully engages with a wide range of film and video sources. The majority of the work undertaken on film sound to date has tended to focus on the narrative feature film, and while my own study also considers classical Hollywood cinema, significant reference is also made to avant-garde film and video, animated cartoons and scratch video. Although each chapter makes use of

in Cinesonica
Andy Birtwistle

Hollywood cinema cannot sustain the intense sense of gaseous undefinability that has been set up here. The diffusive atmosphere of this scene is punctured by the sudden insertion of kinetic energy, provided by a rapid Soviet-style montage of shots of the lights of the oncoming train, close-ups of the transfixed Steele, and the interior of the carriage, each of which is only a few frames in length. However, in the second version of the sequence

in Cinesonica
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Andy Birtwistle

-ceptualisation of sound film as simply ‘canned theatre’ – or in this instance, canned music. In terms of the prioritisation of the visual over the sonic, the avant-garde proves no different from classical Hollywood cinema. Although, as previously stated, music had an important influence on the development avant-garde film, this was limited to providing a model of how an abstract visual experience might be organised in time. As Wollen notes

in Cinesonica
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Jonathan Bignell

of spectatorship in American silent cinema with a passing reference to Buster Keaton. Her concern in the book is the gradual establishment of the regime of spectatorship which we now refer to as ‘classical Hollywood cinema’, and she mentions Keaton’s Sherlock Junior (1924) in this context as a film which dramatises the new spectatorial relation which is being constructed: With the elaboration of a type of narration that seems to anticipate – or strategically frustrate – the viewer’s desire with every shot, the spectator became part of

in Beckett on screen
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Andrew Dix

might extend from Fredric Jameson’s essay, ‘Class and Allegory in Contemporary Mass Culture: Dog Day Afternoon as a Political Film’ (1977) to the chapters entitled ‘Classical Hollywood Cinema and Class’ and ‘Cinematic Class Struggle After the Depression’ in Harry M. Benshoff and Sean Griffin’s America on Film: Representing Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality at the Movies (second edition, 2009 ). Elsewhere, as we will discuss below, film studies has often marginalised or occluded attention to particular class struggles in favour of more abstract, generalised

in Beginning film studies (second edition)
Phil Powrie

disregard of a productive tension. Similarly, the complaint made by Toubiana that the characters in 37 ° 2 le matin talk too much, can be explained by soap’s continual ‘emotional display’ (David Thornburn quoted in Ang 1985 : 68). Such display is an essential part of what Ang calls ‘emotional realism’ (Ang 1985 : 45), which contrasts with the realism of the classical Hollywood cinema, and for that matter the realism of French

in Jean-Jacques Beineix
Andrew Klevan

style of the rococo or, in film, the style of the French nouvelle vague in the 1960s. The Hollywood cinema of the 1920s to 1960s has been understood as a period style, or even a school (and labelled ‘The Classical Hollywood Cinema’ by David Bordwell et al. (1988)). There are also universal styles such as classicism and realism that may transcend specific places and periods (Meskin 2005: 489). The word ‘aesthetic’ is commonly used as a substitute for style: the nouvelle vague aesthetic, or Michael Haneke or David Lynch or Joseph von Sternberg’s aesthetic. A style will

in Aesthetic evaluation and film
Barry Jordan

consisted of collecting ‘memories’ for their ‘old age’! 30 There is insufficient space to develop the point here, but another aspect of Amenábar’s thesis on violence is arguably a complement, if not a challenge, to the Mulveyan paradigm of the gaze outlined earlier. Mulvey argued that the visual pleasure of classical Hollywood cinema was

in Alejandro Amenábar
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Andy Birtwistle

scores did much to popularise the model of string-dominated melodic composition that came to dominate the soundtrack of classical Hollywood cinema. However, Steiner’s otherwise unassailable reputation is blemished by his use of mickey-mousing. The following, from Irwin Bazelon’s Knowing the Score: Notes on Film Music (1975), gives a clear indication of how this compositional practice has typically been viewed within the

in Cinesonica
Andrew Klevan

was writing within what he considered a context of insufficient appreciation for the ‘Classical Hollywood Cinema’ (whose films were typically conceived as standardised). 146 Aesthetic evaluation and film the angle/reverse angle of their conversation follows on from the mirroring or paralleling of the men just before their meeting on the train, especially the cross-cutting between their legs (and feet) as they both approach the station and platform. He repeatedly emphasises that ‘the status of a formal figure’ is acquired through ‘context and intention’ and ‘[o

in Aesthetic evaluation and film