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Derek Gladwin

willingness to allow the process of unfolding to occur. In the opening shot of the film Collins exemplifies the connection between map and mapped by using an establishing long-take shot of the rocky and boggy terrain over a flat section of Connemara.What immediately comes to mind when watching this shot is the immense silence and vast amount of space in Connemara. The relationship between the map and mapped ultimately is based upon communication, or the language of a place. How does a film speak? Or, for that matter, how does a mapped landscape speak? How does a map

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
The visual art of Tim Robinson/Timothy Drever
Catherine Marshall

Ulrich Obrist’s Map Marathon at London’s Serpentine Gallery in 2010, where it rubbed noses with work by artists from all over the world like Louise Bourgeois, Alighiero Boetti, Jimmie Durham and Ed Ruscha, among others. Aran, albeit distressed, was no longer peripheral. Robinson’s work is a passionate plea for the individual that is everywhere challenged by global economics and the blandness of mass communication, a plea for each one of us. He writes, ‘Individually, none of the names I  have mentioned is of much intrinsic interest. But if we think of all the placenames

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Crispian Fuller

Introduction This chapter examines the contribution that G.H. Mead’s conception of the self can make to understanding political subjectivity, and it deploys this approach in a case study of urban politics in the UK. Mead was a key figure in the development of pragmatist psychology and philosophy. He powerfully argued that there can be no self, consciousness of self or communication separate from society ( Mead, 1934 ). His work has profound implications for thinking about human agency, and in this chapter I explore the potential impact of his ideas on

in The power of pragmatism
A Deweyan vision of democracy and social research 
Malcolm P. Cutchin

) Pragmatism and power, or the power to make a difference in a radically contingent world. Geoforum , 39 , 4 , 1613–24 . Antonio , R.J. and Kellner , D. ( 1992 ) Communication, modernity, and democracy in Habermas and Dewey. Symbolic Interaction , 15 , 277–97 . Barnett , C. and Bridge , G. ( 2013 ) Geographies of radical democracy: Agonistic pragmatism and the formation of affected interests. Annals of the Association of American Geographers , 103 , 1022–40 . Bridge , G. ( 2008 ) City senses: On the radical possibilities of pragmatism in geography

in The power of pragmatism
Abstract only
Alex Schafran, Matthew Noah Smith and Stephen Hall

-provision. Informal settlements are generally collectively built, with complex networks and markets for providing building materials. They too engage larger reliance systems for energy and communication, for food provision, for water and sanitation. 2 In short, people do not self-provision the reliance systems that give us our capacities. Reliance systems are instead collectively provisioned. By collective we don’t mean communal, or state-run, or any particular institutional form. You may be provisioned by your neighbour, your tribe, your local or national government

in The spatial contract
A trialogue
Sybille Lammes, Kate McLean and Chris Perkins

smell we are about going forward? We saying something intimate and talked about memories a personal, coming from subbit. What about futurity? jective memories. What role might smell play in your work in terms of bringing possible futures into being, as against ­recollecting pasts? Mapping the quixotic volatility of smellscapes 67 In terms of bringing the future into being a potential role for smell is to think of it as a communication tool in its own right, more than simply a navigational aid. As human beings we’re very  extraordinarily good at processing vast

in Time for mapping
Louise Amoore

Globalisation, restructuring and flexibility 25 flexibilised productive and working practices in line with their dictates (see Womack et al., 1990; Hirst and Zeitlin, 1989). Fordist mass production is presented as technologically outmoded as new information and communication technologies (ICTs) increase the possibilities for flexibilisation and the geographical and temporal dispersal of production. The ‘flexible firm’ becomes the fêted site for global production, bringing with it new demands for the reorganisation of work (Atkinson, 1985). The combination of technological

in Globalisation contested
The restructuring of work in Britain
Louise Amoore

attraction of FDI. The virtues of the expansion of contingent labour are also expounded by arguments that Britain’s low levels of unemployment are, in part, due to deregulation and the expansion of alternative and ‘more imaginative’ forms of work (OECD, 1997). Yet again here the emphasis is on the self-discipline of individuals who will accept disruptions to daily life in the form of unpredictable working time, in exchange for the relative security of a job. Indeed, the flexible labour represented by homeworkers linked by information and communication technologies is even

in Globalisation contested
Abstract only
Postcolonialism and ecology in the work of Tim Robinson
Eóin Flannery

fragments that make up the global; place name archaeology is one of the vital strands in generating a sense of truly informed residency in a particular location. But, as we have argued above, this is not a licence to revert to an undiluted myth of origin; as Nash notes, ‘Like language, placenames have been interpreted as keys to neat and natural cultural categories, but also like languages, placename projects and policies present opportunities to rethink culture as a dynamic and social form of communication and meaning-making. Placenames speak of a sense of location and

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
In defence of the Irish essay
Karen Babine

. 35 Root’s chapter was originally presented at the 2001 meeting of the Conference of College Composition and Communication, not to a creative writing audience, a moment that illustrates the multi-layered complications (and opportunities) of studying the essay. 36 Root, Guide, 85. 37 Atkins, Reading, 8. 38 Chris Arthur, ‘(En)trance’, in On the Shoreline of Knowledge (Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa Press, 2012), 26. 39 Arthur, ‘(En)trance’, 35. 40 Tim Robinson, Stones of Aran: Pilgrimage (London: Penguin, 1986), 282. 41 Bill Roorbach, Writing Life Stories

in Unfolding Irish landscapes