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Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

13 Responses from ‘the margins’ While we have acknowledged that the past and continuing global dominance of Hollywood movies remains obvious and at present apparently inexorable, debate continues about whether this domination is, in essence, to be celebrated or condemned. Competing views about Hollywood are associated with questions regarding what effects arise from this domination. To examine and assess the cultural politics of American imperialism – that is, the socio-political effects of Hollywood’s cinematic dominance – it is necessary to consider debates

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

11 Questioning the critical We have argued throughout this book that the scope of movies that can be considered ‘political’ is much broader than is often assumed. For us, all movies are political in one way or another. How, then, should we understand those films that are more ostensibly political or socially engaged? In this chapter we continue our examination of ‘socially critical’ films (as defined in chapter 10) to consider the extent to which they offer any challenge to dominant power relations with regard to nation, culture, class, gender, sexuality, race

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

7 Gender and intimate relationships Our overriding purpose in this book is to mine the stories presented to us in Hollywood movies for their historically situated political myths and meanings. In the preceding chapters, we focused on the citizen–state relationship, exploring how political order and disorder are mythologised on screen. In the three chapters to follow, we turn our attention to how our identities and relationships with others are represented in Hollywood movies. Here we focus not so much on the citizen–state political myths of Hollywood but the

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
Abstract only
Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

8 Romance In the previous chapter, we explored some of the ways that gender politics informs Hollywood movies, attending to ‘chick flicks’ and romance films in particular. We argued that practices of exclusion and invisibility are produced by male domination, male-centredness, and male identification, and that these have politically salient effects. Women and girls are represented as caring about and taking pleasure in (almost exclusively heterosexual) romantic relationships, investing in the fairytale happy ending typified by the wedding, and by implication

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
Abstract only
Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

9 Bromance We have argued throughout this book that political myths run deeper than the most obvious government, military, and civic agendas. Political concepts and conventions shape and influence our deepest emotional connections: power relations inform our identities even in intimate relations of intense intersubjectivity, marking what is visible and representable from the invisible and unthinkable. In the preceding two chapters, we considered how gendered power relations and romantic relationships are represented in Hollywood movies. More specifically, in

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
Abstract only
Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

5 Disorder and fear Fear, as both a motivation for and tactic of security, occupies an important place in cultural politics. Security can be understood positively as the struggle to generate or protect the social order, moral worth, and the citizenry, or negatively as struggling against or dealing with threats. Security films reiterate conceptions of order, virtue, authority, and safety on one hand, as against disorder, impropriety, social rifts, and danger on the other. In this chapter and the next, we turn to this second side of security films. When security

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
Abstract only
Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

/it, and threats to the social polity are found in a much more diverse range of genres. In this chapter, our attention rests on films in the former category. Representations of security-as-order can be identified in films from the genres of war, political leadership, combat, spy, cop, and action movies, along with some fantasy and science fiction films. Nevertheless, only the first two – films about war and political leadership – are typically and almost inevitably immersed in the reiteration of security mythology. The most obvious location for political myths relating

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
Lady Morgan‘s The Wild Irish Girl
Bridget Matthews-Kane

In 1807, the Duchess of Bedford and several of her circle attended a performance of the opera The First Attempt at Dublin‘s Theatre Royal. Their hair was not coifed in the style of the day but rather swept up and fastened with golden bodkins in the ancient Irish manner. Soon this became all the rage in polite Irish society, and Dublin jewellers, struggling to compete, took out advertisements to accuse other firms of making less than authentic replicas. Indeed, the great demand in Dublin for these golden bodkins inflated the price of gold in Ireland. Drapers soon saw a business opportunity in this Celtic fashion renaissance and started producing the `Glorvina Mantle, a flowing scarlet cape, ideally secured with golden replicas of Celtic broaches. Eventually these ancient Gaelic styles made their way to London and became fashionable among ladies from the upper class. The popularity of this exotic dress resulted from a confluence of factors. While the growing interest in Irish antiquarianism, the European fascination with orientalism and the popularity of Gothic romance fed the fire, the spark that ignited the blaze was The Wild Irish Girl, a novel written by a young Irish governess. Not only does this fashion craze bear witness to the popularity of the text, but so do the sales figures. This popular novel, first published in 1806, went through seven editions in two years, and was even successful on the Continent, especially in Germany, where the young authors popularity almost eclipsed Scott‘s and Byron‘s and her sales figures surpassed those of her fellow Irish writers, Maria Edgeworth and Charles Maturin. In fact, the great Gothic writer Maturin openly borrowed from The Wild Irish Girl in his own work.

Gothic Studies
ESPN and the Un-Americanisation of Global Football
Jon Lewis

This article examines the cultural politics of American soccer fandom, with specific attention paid to the ways in which the sport is positioned and platformed by the major sports networks, including, especially, cable televisions biggest player in the United States, ESPN. The networks‘ failure to exploit soccer as a marketable commodity can be traced to a persistent American futility at the sport on the international level, but it evinces as well a larger American cultural problematic, one in which ethnocentrism and isolationism is disguised, as it often is, as American exceptionalism.

Film Studies
John Corner

4 Mediated politics, promotional culture and the idea of ‘propaganda’ PRELIMINARY NOTE As earlier chapters have indicated, ‘propaganda’ is a term used regularly in political and public discussion of the media, but one that has a less marked and more intermittent usage as a term of theory and analysis in media research. One notable exception to this is in that work using the ‘propaganda model’ as outlined by Edward Herman and Noam Chomsky over twenty years ago (Herman and Chomsky, 1988), in which the general relations between the political system and the media

in Theorising Media