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3 Inclusivity and changing organisational forms [T]he constraints to cyberactivism are largely those that hobble other political involvement: commitment, time, money, expertise . . . those who may benefit the most from counterhegemonic uses of the Net may have the least access to it. (Warf and Grimes 1997: 270) In addition to the paradox surrounding their use of computers, environmentalists face problems in gaining access to CMC. Access is obviously a prerequisite for the use of the technology, but the ways in which activists organise their access can reflect

in Cyberprotest
The restructuring of work in Germany

state-societies (Giddens, 1998). Gerhard Schröder’s apparent embracing of the individualism and ‘workfare’ (Jessop, 1994) strategy of Blair’s ‘Third Way’ in his ‘Neue Mitte’ concept may be read as indicative of an acceptance of the necessary restructuring imperatives of a global economy. Yet, when we explore the debate taking place within and outside German state-society it becomes clear that the representation of Germany as a rigid and inflexible political economy in need of radical restructuring is by no means uncontested. An effective counter to neo-liberal claims

in Globalisation contested
Listening in/to Tim Robinson

which themselves resonate in relation to a variety of philosophical and political systems. ‘Listening’ is a relatively small word for a dauntingly complex series of propositions and possibilities.There are numerous ways in which humans may listen, and numerous disciplines and theories for which listening constitutes a key category within a wider discursive system. Among other things, ‘listening’ connotes an ability and a practice that is at once physiological, psychological, philosophical, sociological, technological, musicological and cultural-historical. It is

in Unfolding Irish landscapes

2 Nodes, ways and relations Joe Gerlach Here, now Maps, mappings, cartographies; (dis)orientations for the everyday, obdurate disciplinary motifs of and for geography, maligned and admired in variable measure. Cartography; a science and set of practices once pertaining to sovereign power alone, yet now increasingly diffuse in its geographic reach and performance. Nonetheless, whether rendered through hegemonic, quotidian or hybrid assemblages, mapping remains resolutely (geo)political at a range of disparate registers; statist to somatic. Elsewhere, I have used

in Time for mapping

defences. The need to mobilise participation for environmental activism reflects a broader issue for society, that of how participation in political life can be encouraged (Walters 2002). In chapter 3 the emphasis by many environmental groups on participatory democracy and the difficulties in practising such ideals through their own organisational forms were explored. This chapter continues that theme, but more closely examines how participation in activism (rather than in just CMC use) is encouraged, and the the value of CMC specifically to this endeavour. While Putnam

in Cyberprotest
The deep mapping projects of Tim Robinson’s art and writings, 1969–72

the reader to slow down, and to 55 56 Nessa Cronin engage with his ‘decelerated practice of walking the fields of Inishmore’.24 The danger seems to be that with speed, one can slip off the surface and lose one’s foothold and grip on the world all too easily.25 This interpretation of Robinson is later included and framed within a larger context in The Expanding World: Towards a Politics of Microspection, which argues for the need (ecologically and politically) for an in-depth analysis and understanding of the local in terms of reframing our relationship with

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
The case for practice theory

Situationist 156 Stitching memories movements (Rasmussen, 2004); and second, through theoretical critique of the power relations between map content and spatial knowledge(s). On the latter, key moments include Harley and Woodward’s History of Cartography (Andrews, 2001) – a massively ambitious (and on-going) project, intended to redress subaltern dynamics within map representation (Harley, 1987). In drawing on Harley’s combination of post-structuralism, semiotics and social constructionism, the project sought to critique knowledge-politics in map representation (1988a

in Time for mapping
Young people in migrant worker families in Ireland

in Ireland has received attention in political circles and in the popular press due to a number of ‘moral panics’ concerning children’s education and socialisation (Ní Laoire et al., 2009) and, more recently, the economic recession. In times of economic uncertainty, immigration often is perceived as a threat and of concern to society. Recent research by Spencer, Ruhs, Anderson and Rogaly (2007) in a UK context suggests that migrant workers who migrate with children are more likely to intend to remain living in their host country, specifically because they are more

in Spacing Ireland
100 years of Ireland in National Geographic magazine

making damask, fine nylon, Dacron and other synthetic fabrics, along with new industrial estates and advance factories primed for a whole range of foreign investment. However, ominously, Harland and Wolff ’s shipbuilding had laid off half its 20,000 workforce, and the unbalanced political representation in the province was a cause for concern: nationalists ‘remain aloof. Most go to their own parochial schools; most favor [sic] reunification with southern Ireland, which the British Protestant community in Ulster vehemently opposes’ (Conly, August 1964: 267). The Aran

in Spacing Ireland
Open Access (free)
Mapping times

political and social positions, but interestingly temporality was only rarely explored by critical thinkers focusing on mapping. Further, radical rethinking of space-time and time-space from the position of animating the construct (see Merriman, 2011) underplays the implications of digital mapping for temporality: a point we return to in the conclusion to this chapter. For the moment though, it is safe to argue that few attempts have been made to resolve the paradoxes of this spatio-temporal dualism from the perspective of the digital aspect of digital maps. As previously

in Time for mapping