Search results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 90 items for :

  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
Clear All
Abstract only
Heike Wieters

) worldwide. Aware and proud of CARE’s charitable purpose, its central role in global humanitarian relief, and its public visibility in international politics, Gauer alludes to various aspects of humanitarian practice that are usually ignored or hidden. Not only does he discuss money, fundraising, and CARE’s business relations with commercial enterprises, broadcasting networks, and advertising agencies, but

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Daniel Stevens and Nick Vaughan-Williams

scholars seeking to better understand non-elite knowledge, experience, and perceptions of the contemporary politics of security threats at the level of the everyday face a significant challenge. This challenge, we argue, is primarily methodological because vernacular constructions of the concept of security, public encounters with and negotiations of security, and factors influencing the way citizens

in Everyday security threats
Jonathan Benthall

borders. In China, for instance, the question for the state is not whether or not to regulate religion, but how much regulation is the right amount to maintain a ‘harmonious society’. Grim and Finke are surely right to point to China’s state policies on religion as closely linked to the survival of a political system still nominally based on Communism. In Chinese history, state power

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Open Access (free)
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

assuring peace, with his Preliminary Article 5 on non-intervention in his Toward Perpetual Peace (see chapter 5 ). In the course of the long nineteenth century, five positions on the matter can be discerned in international law and international political theory: (1) strict adherence to non-intervention; (2) exceptions limited to instances of threats to national interests; (3) exceptions to include protracted civil wars when a state has collapsed into

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Abstract only
Pathologising security through Lacanian desire
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

that there was one informer for every six people in the state). 1 Instead, the political economy of threat imagination continued to constitute ever-more paranoid threats to authority from the people – generating ever-more invasive surveillance and extended policies for detention. This escalation came to a climax when the regime rightly identified the potential for social opposition within Church

in Death and security
Jonathan Benthall

negative connotation in much of the non-Muslim world, even among the generally well informed. Certainly during the Afghan conflict of the 1980s and the Balkan conflict of the early 1990s, a number of Islamic charities, especially those deriving from the petrodollar states, engaged in activities that pursued a mixture of humanitarian, religious, political and sometimes military aims. It

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Abstract only
Jonathan Benthall

of the European charitable foundation. Shortly afterwards, I met a French political scientist, Jérôme Bellion-Jourdan, who had done complementary research in Sudan, Pakistan and Bosnia, and we pooled our resources to publish a jointly authored book, The Charitable Crescent: Politics of aid in the Muslim world (2003). We agreed not merely to present our conclusion that the extent of Islamic

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Heike Wieters

decade in which the limits of a state-centered perspective on politics, social, economic, and ecological phenomena became striking, undeniable, and accordingly “real” to people all over the world in manifold ways. 2 From international debt, oil prices, and food crises, to the transnational anti-war movement and the rise of the debate on “limits to growth,” at the beginning of

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Jonathan Benthall

State’ that is touched on towards the end of this chapter, the political scientist Steve Niva has recently argued that this is a new amalgam of Salafi-Wahhabism with ‘twentieth century communist and leftist traditions of revolutionary warfare, updated for the information age’. Niva draws on Naomi Klein’s theory of the ‘shock doctrine’: that unpopular policies are often imposed on

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Abstract only
Eric James and Tim Jacoby

reveals few historical examples because civil society and its actors were not typically part of the commonly accepted history. Further analysis reveals a different picture. The presence of aid organizations and the blurring of the lines between humanitarians and the military extend throughout the historical record and the ethical position has depended on political context

in The humanitarian-military complex in Afghanistan