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The politics of African nationalism in Kenya is a topic that has not lacked for scholarly attention. Alongside the many contemporary, or near contemporary studies, of the Mau Mau rebellion and the political process of the transfer of powers which followed its suppression, a spate of recent literature has excavated new sources, re-examined old arguments and presented new

in Policing and decolonisation

social anthropology. I will look particularly at the role of the Sudan Intelligence Report (SIR ) and Sudan Notes and Records (SNR ) as media for ethnographic writing and documentation. Both publications were unique in British Africa: SIR was the continuation of the Egyptian Army Intelligence department’s pre-Reconquest series of printed reports which monitored political

in Ordering Africa

The linkage of biblical translation with the development of the nation and the standardisation of spoken languages is not a new theme in scholarly studies of modern nationalism. 1 By extension, the issue of modern biblical translation also became drawn into the politics of empire. Whether explicitly stated or not, modern biblical translation often posed a challenge to imperial institutions, testing the limits of a national agenda, and illumining the relationship between empire and nation. I

in Chosen peoples
Tradition, modernity and indirect rule

We now turn our attention to political change. The familiar tale is that officials saw in indirect rule the best chance of sustaining ‘traditional’ African social systems in perpetuity. ‘Reformed’ indigenous elites would garner the respect of Africans by governing responsibly, thereby defusing the threat of social unrest and maintaining British power. It has been customary

in Exporting empire
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1930s and disappeared almost without trace after 1945. By 1889 43,960 students had enrolled in 2,940 public schools in Burma. Education was on the brink of transforming society. 2 Winston had dreamed of a day when networks of Wesleyan primary schools would feed mission ‘high schools and training institutions’. 3 Political antagonism and lack of resources ultimately prevented the fulfilment of his ambition. Despite this, within two years Winston had established five schools with a total of 139 pupils. 4 Three of the

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
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churches and Muslim mosques. Senior pongyis mounted vigorous protests, which prompted the Revolutionary Council to retreat. Confusingly, it explained that the regulation applied only to ‘religious associations’ involved in ‘political activities’. 37 By April 1964 Bishop was the last ‘front-line’ Methodist missionary in Upper Burma and the last European of any sort in Monywa. 38 Barbara Bishop had returned to Britain with their children in February. Bishop discovered only by accident that his colleague, Rev. Broxholme

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
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an unhealthy place for European missionaries. Office politics caused difficulties too, and personnel problems cropped up with increasing regularity as more missionaries arrived. Winston was beside himself in 1897 when the Missionary Committee issued nambypamby new guidelines for the selection of missionaries. Winston had one trusty selection criterion. He looked for ‘a strong man in every sense’. 61 It seemed to him that the Committee just wanted men ‘fond of sitting quiet’. Winston felt particularly sore because

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
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April 1944. Acheson did not reply in case it fell into Japanese hands. U Po Wine was leader of the Kalemyo Methodists. 12 SOAS/MMS/Correspondence/FBN4/W. Brown-Moffett (BCMS), 19 December 1944; Chemi, a Lushai girl, translated for him. She was educated at Mandalay Girls High School, had trained as a nurse in Moulmein and became prominent in the post-war Church. 13 Dorothy Hess Guyot, ‘The Political Impact of the Japanese Occupation of Burma’, unpublished PhD

in Conflict, politics and proselytism

Calling to Mind , H.E.W. Braund’s history of Steel Brothers (Oxford, Pergamon, 1975), but Kennedy is mentioned in various private papers. 50 SOAS/MMS/Uncatalogued/MRP/6D/26/Firth Papers: Letter from Firth, June 1942. 51 The evacuation had profound political repercussions. It caused abrasions within the civil administration and rifts between the civil and military authorities. Useful analyses of the episode are provided by Christopher Bayly and Tim Harper

in Conflict, politics and proselytism

Until the riots of 28 February 1948 occurred, the Gold Coast’s police force had played a relatively slight role in the country’s politics. From their inception they had, it is true, attempted to contain local ‘disturbances’, but the acquisition of political intelligence, a role usually associated with a specialist unit, the Special Branch, had not been part of their

in Policing and decolonisation