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Rechnological necromancy and E. Elias Merhige’s Shadow of the Vampire

productions, registers the curious contemporary paradox in our socio-cultural attitude towards death – namely, that death is ‘rejected as a presence in everyday life [while being] excessively staged’ publicly (Goodwin and Bronfen, 1993 : 16). Body politics are at the core of such mediation in the form of our corporeal, mortal bodies, bodies that are always gendered in

in The Gothic and death
Networked spectrality in Charlie Brooker’s 'Be Right Back’

’ ( 2002 ). Rather than a project of linguistic abstraction, Luckhurst calls for attention to be paid to the ‘specific symptomatology’ (542) of the ghost, issuing a rallying call for scholars to crack open the present absences of the ghost to situate it in its specific context. To that end, networked spectrality considers the relevant developmental, technical, social, and political

in The Gothic and death
The spectacle of death and the aesthetics of crowd control

political sphere into the personal/domestic sphere contained within the Gothic novel. Notably, when attacking the Revolution, Burke deploys the language of colonialism and, when attacking British rule in the Bengal (in a speech supporting Charles James Fox’s 1783 East India Bill), he declares that British India ‘sustains, almost every year, the miseries of a revolution’ ([1793] 1968

in The Gothic and death

some of the fixed points of contemporary critical argument. A great deal of television drama has been discussed in relation to ideas of social realism; this is as true of popular drama series and soaps ( Coronation Street (1960–) and EastEnders (1985–)) as it is of the more experimental and politically challenging one-off plays and films associated with the BBC anthology series, The Wednesday Play (1964–70) and Play for Today (1970–84). Paul Abbot’s award-winning and popular drama series Clocking Off is, as Cooke argues (and the series’s makers acknowledge

in Popular television drama
The politics of ‘Crazyspace’, children’s television and the case of The Demon Headmaster

network for kids to chat. Supposed to be safer than surfing the Net.’ She pulled a funny face, and laughed . . . ‘So you can still chat? To people all over the place?’ ‘Only children.’ ‘Children will do fine.’ Dinah pulled up a chair and sat down. ‘Can you show us how to get in?’ (Cross 1997 : 60–61) This scene flags up some issues in the debate about the politics and ideology of children’s television, which I want to develop in this essay (for further discussions of this debate see also Bazalgette and Buckingham 1995 ; Buckingham, Davies, Jones and

in Popular television drama
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Some reflections on the relationship between television and theatre

(largely working-class) people who lay beyond the consciousness of political debate, often with a direct ideological objective. Social realism was realist in the sense that it usually adopted the mimetic dramatic methods (in both theatre and television) that had become established within the realist tradition (see Raymond Williams 1977 ) and which foregrounded verisimilitude. It was also realist in that it offered an argument about, and analysis of, social reality; this kind of realism was particularly strong amongst the more politically engaged radicals working in

in Popular television drama
Directions and redirections

, however, there are constraints on what researchers can bring to the public domain because of the political economy of academic publishing. The expansion of the teaching of television has led to a proliferation of books that discuss and summarise existing research, but the unpredicability and risk for publishers in presenting new research in specialist areas of the field has made it increasingly difficult for authors to gain contracts for new studies. This is exacerbated by the largely national character of television drama production and broadcasting, even in the global

in Popular television drama

dialogue with theoretical work on modernity and subjectivity that places such hesitations and contingencies of meaning at the centre of a theory of subjectivity. Although The Prisoner has been the subject of extensive critical debate among fans and academic theorists alike, Bould shows that the programme in a sense anticipates this debate and enfolds its multiple positions within its own television realisation. Thus the series both fails to match some of the criteria of quality (such as coherence, well-formed narrative or engagement with issues of public political

in Popular television drama
The Gothic, death, and modernity

-yet-desired annihilation of our subjectivity and signposts a (possible) secular cul-de-sac, the corpse has become the ‘supreme signifier for anything from human destiny and its redemption to life’s meaninglessness’ (Webster Goodwin and Bronfen, 1993 : 17). Bound up with the exercise and abuse of political power, corpses also tap the deep Romantic well of affect to different ends. They are crucial to the expression and

in The Gothic and death
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Washington Irving’s Gothic afterlives

after the hero of the American Revolution, George Washington. Irving’s text, however, questions this glorification of the national hero. Irving places the personal at the centre at the expense of the political. The first name (‘George’) takes precedence over the national/political role (‘King’ or ‘President’). Thus Irving’s protagonist, Rip, a man

in The Gothic and death