Oscar de León and his family, sister Lola, mother Belicia, and grandfather Abelard as they negotiate the curse, or fukú, on their family. Narrated by Yunior, a family friend and a character who appears elsewhere in Díaz’s literary universe, the novel is framed as a bildungsroman of 154 Crossing borders and queering citizenship sorts. However, the novel displaces readerly expectations of a biographical bildungsroman. Instead of offering a linear account of the titular character’s life and times, Díaz’s novel weaves multiple intergenerational narratives, moving back

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship
Zombie pharmacology In the Flesh

is dangerously absurd, as the collapse of so-called futures markets in 2008 attests. And In the Flesh interrogates this model of futurity through an insistent textual queering of the paradigm. Roarton is, after all, an avowedly heteronormative society. It enforces its customs, practices and values through the social exclusion of those who fail to conform. It transmits them

in Neoliberal Gothic
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Queer outcasts and the politics of wounded attachment

 79 3 The pariah: queer outcasts and the politics of wounded attachment The figure of the pariah represents one of the key paradoxes of exceptionality:  though conventionally despised and avoided by the majority, found to be untouchable or unspeakable, the pariah nonetheless persists within the social scene. The pariah is an outcast who ‘sticks around’, intelligible as a breach of social norms because he or she remains within their frame of reference. While the pariah may constitute the limit conditions of the social –​describing both the kinds of subject who

in Queer exceptions

a context to explain why treatments for sexual deviations came to be developed and implemented. World War II The start of World War II and mobilisation meant that men who had never been away from home suddenly found themselves on the move. They were mixing with other people of their own age and 39 ‘Curing queers’ were responsible only to themselves – it is not surprising to find that the war created new sexual experiences and shaped more liberal attitudes towards variations in sexual desires.3 During the first year of the war many male nurses were called up for

in ‘Curing queers’
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age of 21 should be decriminalised. A further recommendation was 231 ‘Curing queers’ that medical treatments should be made available to homosexuals to cure them of their disorder – reinforcing the notion that homosexuality was the result of an ingrained condition, which could be cured. Following Wolfenden there was a distinct altering of notions about homosexuality from a criminal perspective to understandings of the subject as pathology. This was coupled with what Chris Waters describes as the ‘therapeutic state’, based on the belief that experts, with their

in ‘Curing queers’
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Dramaturgies of endurance, exhaustion and confession

souls,  52 52 Queer exceptions they gain them, by denying themselves, they find themselves’ (Fitzgerald and Cavadini 1999:  538)  –​in which renunciation is always an act of witness to something other than their own identity. In this mimetic epistemology, the suffering body of the martyr was made one in corporate unity with Christ yet maintained in a careful hierarchy:  Christ’s death alone comprised a redemptive sacrifice. Through this frame, Augustine ascribed to the martyr a pedagogic function whose exemplary actions might inspire others to join the ranks of

in Queer exceptions
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perception in relation to the use of aversion therapy to ‘cure’ homosexuality and transvestism. 1 ‘Curing queers’ In this way, it seeks to offer fresh insight into both patients’ and nurses’ perspectives on these treatments. It uses testimonies of patients and nurses to explore the subject in ways that have not been attempted before, and to texture more broadly focused histories of these treatments and this period. This echoes recent moves towards ­micro-histories particularly when looking at sexuality and nursing, as a way of framing and answering questions about

in ‘Curing queers’

innovative therapies in a bid to gain an insight into the culture and practices within which the mental hospitals’ nurses were working during the 1930s to the 1950s. In doing so, it offers a framework to explain how nurses became accustomed to administering treatments which caused pain and distress to patients. The chapter also explores the hitherto hidden history of gay life among male homosexual nurses within mental hospitals and deconstructs the contentious dichotomy of these nurses 91 ‘Curing queers’ administering treatments for patients ‘suffering’ from the same

in ‘Curing queers’
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Performing ‘out- of- placeness’ in the UK and Europe

confronting it’ (Simmel 1971: 144) –​ a position which gives them a particular and even enviable critical distance. Lacking the commitment to the ‘unique ingredients and tendencies of the group’ that might characterise original membership, the stranger is gifted with objectivity: the freedom to ‘experience and treat even his close relationships as though from a bird’s-​eye view’ (Simmel 1971: 146). The stranger, in short, is an outsider who is also an insider, and an insider who  134 134 Queer exceptions is also an outsider –​a figure of exception whose inclusion is

in Queer exceptions

more difficult. Perhaps ironically, Nanette has been a considerable commercial success:  touring to sell-​out performances at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and for a month at the Soho Theatre, London, attracting multiple awards including the Helpmann Award for Best Comedy Performer, and recently recorded live at the Sydney Opera House for release on the streaming service Netflix. Though Nanette might challenge the demand for self-​exploitation in stand-​up, it also  22 22 Queer exceptions reflects Gadsby’s self-​description as a comedian who likes ‘to take a

in Queer exceptions