Aaron Edwards

7 The British Labour Party and the tragedy of Northern Ireland Labour Aaron Edwards Labour politics is regarded as a minority pursuit in Northern Ireland. Indeed, the recent ‘Troubles’ all but destroyed the electoral prospects of non-sectarian democratic socialism in that deeply divided part of the United Kingdom. However, there is much more to the story than conventional wisdom would care to admit. For instance, the British Labour Party enjoyed long-standing structural ties with the Northern Ireland Labour Party (NILP) from the 1920s until the 1970s. This

in The British Labour Party and twentieth-century Ireland
John Cunningham

13 Anglo-Irish diplomatic relations and the British Labour Party, 1981–94 Melinda Sutton ‘The Opposition have put forward proposals for advancing towards a united Ireland. We believe that that is the right course that we should travel.’1 With these words, the Labour Party leader, Michael Foot, heralded his party’s commitment to the pursuit of Irish unification by consent, a policy that was welcomed by the Irish government in 1981.2 In the absence of majority consent to unification, Labour sought improvements in Anglo-Irish relations and the expansion of the Irish

in The British Labour Party and twentieth-century Ireland
Abstract only
Elisabeth Carter

2 Party ideology Parties of the extreme right are to some extent ‘masters of their own success’. That is, regardless of the political environment in which they operate and regardless of the institutional contexts within which they find themselves, their electoral success will depend, in part, on the ideology they espouse and the policies they put forward, and on the way in which they are organized and led. This chapter focuses on the first of these party-centric factors, and examines the extent to which the ideologies of the extreme right parties influence their

in The extreme right in Western Europe
Abstract only
Elisabeth Carter

4 Party competition In its bid to account for the varying levels of electoral success of the parties of the extreme right across Western Europe, this book has so far examined the influence of party-centric factors. It has considered the impact of different types of extreme right party ideology on the right-wing extremist party vote and has also investigated the effects of party organization and leadership. In this chapter, the book turns to exploring the influence of contextual factors on the success of the right-wing extremist parties, and introduces another

in The extreme right in Western Europe
Abstract only
Duncan Watts

Chap 8 28/8/03 1:13 pm Page 178 Political parties 8 Political parties are organisations of broadly like-minded men and women which seek to win power in elections in order that they can then assume responsibility for controlling the apparatus of government. Unlike interest groups, which seek merely to influence the government, serious parties aims to secure the levers of power. In this chapter, we examine their relevance in Britain and America. The emphasis is on the competition between the two main parties in either country for the control of public offices

in Understanding US/UK government and politics
Abstract only
Bernadette C. Hayes and Ian McAllister

Political parties reflect the societies within which they operate. Competition between parties – in pursuit of resources, power and, occasionally, prestige – is very much based on the competition that occurs between the different social groups that exist within a society. In the new European democracies of the 1920s, the contemporary party systems that emerged were

in Conflict to peace
Abstract only
Ambitious architecture, flawed rules
David Hine and Gillian Peele

11 Party funding: ambitious architecture, flawed rules Introduction: public interest beyond public office-holders Parties present special problems for ethics regulators. Parties are not official public institutions, so party office-holders are not technically public office-holders. Yet there is clearly a public interest in what they do, how they are organised and how they raise money. In modern democracies there is usually at least some light legal regulation of parties, but it mainly concerns public registration and transparency about who is legally responsible

in The regulation of standards in British public life
Abstract only
Paolo Dardanelli

Political parties were the most important elite actors in the politics of Scottish self-government. Where parties stood on the spectrum of constitutional options, what perceptions they had of the European dimension and how they played their strategies are crucial factors in assessing their impact on the distribution of preferences at public opinion level. In this chapter I analyse such factors in relation to the Scottish National party (SNP), the Labour party and the Conservative party, the three main actors of the Scottish party system

in Between two Unions
Abstract only
Division and decline, 1964–70
Christopher Norton

8 Nationalist Party: division and decline, 1964–70 Dr Conn McCluskey, a Dungannon GP and a founder of the civil rights group the Campaign for Social Justice, was later to locate the ‘nemesis’ of the Nationalist Party to a televised debate between James O’Reilly MP and Brian Faulkner, the Unionist Minister of Home Affairs, that took place in February 1964. The subject of the debate was discrimination but O’Reilly was ill-­ prepared and hopelessly ‘out of his depth’ against the urbane Faulkner.1 When Faulkner challenged O’Reilly to produce any evidence to

in The politics of constitutional nationalism in Northern Ireland, 1932–70
Abstract only
Paolo Dardanelli

Despite significant change in the Scottish party system between the 1970s and the 1990s, in particular the accelerated decline of the Conservatives and the stabilisation at a fairly high level of the SNP, party positions on self-government remained remarkably stable. Labour championed devolution, the SNP pursued independence but supported devolution as second best and the Conservatives favoured the status quo, albeit this time also in principle as well as in practice. The strategic playing of the self-government game, on the other hand

in Between two Unions