Search results

Abstract only
Calendar time in balade form
Catherine Sanok

literature and religion, especially as this relationship has been defined through the paradigm of ‘secularisation’. Revisiting this paradigm is a key project of this volume, which in its very title counters an old expectation that literature and sanctity are antithetical. It thus takes up the critical debate about literature and ‘secularisation’ that has been revived in recent years in the context of new inquiry into the status of the secular by political theorists, sociologists, historians of religion, and literary scholars.7 This debate has challenged the assumption of

in Sanctity as literature in late medieval Britain
Abstract only
Laura Schwartz

Freethinking feminist tradition, operating within a symbiotic and antiphonal relationship with Christianity, thus highlights the extent to which first wave feminism developed out of a battle of ideas over religion. These emerging notions of women’s rights were likewise central to the formation of modern definitions of faith and secularisation. Defining the religious and the secular The extent to which Freethought was shaped by Christianity

in Infidel feminism
Abstract only
Spirituality, affect and women
Nadia Kiwan

to these areas of convergence across a number of religious traditions in contemporary France. For Babès, one of the major indicators of a shared tendency, particularly between Islam and Christianity, is the process of secularisation. Babès refutes the widely held assumption that Islam is somehow not concerned with or affected by secularisation and instead argues that what we are seeing in contemporary French Islam in particular is a clear shift towards secularisation, which plays out in frequently contradictory terms. For Babès, secularisation does not entail the

in Secularism, Islam and public intellectuals in contemporary France
Chantal Mouffe

universally valid and uniquely European in origin. An important consequence of this formulation is that the spread of human rights is generally seen as requiring the adoption by other societies of the Western model of liberal democracy. It is further asserted that this can only occur when accompanied by a process of secularisation. Most contemporary political theory – leaving aside the reality of Western politics – asserts that Western liberal democracy is the necessary framework for the implementation of human rights. Liberal democracy is presented as the ‘good regime

in Religion and rights
Abstract only
Conversion narratives in the modern
Chris Davies

ended with Ridley Scott’s Gladiator in 2000. Scott’s film, an updated pastiche of previous epics, utilised the structural beats of the conversion narrative but largely excluded its religious core. Seemingly as a response to contemporary events including 9/11 and the ensuing War on Terror, Gladiator ’s successors further revised and secularised the narrative device, replacing discovery of faith with the horrors of imperialism as the catalyst for change. In the case of Roman epics, the principal sub-genre in which conversion narratives occur, this change has been

in The Bible onscreen in the new millennium
Bryan Fanning

enforced public morality offered the only potential bulwark against the acceleration of secularisation. The state, he argued, had a duty to Ireland’s Catholic majority to enforce Catholic public morality. The Catholic ideal, he insisted, in his book Studies in Political Morality (1962) was for an established Church. It should never surrender this ideal in theoretical discussions on Church–state relations. More generally it should never surrender the primacy of theology to political theory. He faulted progressive American theologians for having done so. The demands of the

in Are the Irish different?
Bryan Fanning

morality offered the only potential bulwark against the acceleration of secularisation. The state, he argued, had a duty to Ireland’s Catholic majority to enforce Catholic public morality. The Catholic ideal, he insisted in his book Studies in Political Morality (1962), was for an established Church. It should never surrender this ideal in theoretical discussions on Church–state relations. More generally it should never surrender the primacy of theology to political theory. He faulted progressive American theologians for having done so. The demands of the Church of

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Abstract only
Sanctity as literature
Eva von Contzen

Bernau (Chapter 8), von Contzen (Chapter 9), James (Chapter 7) and Larsen (Chapter 11) identify as the building blocks of the literary can be linked with the more general cultural processes Julia Reinhard Lupton has termed the ‘passion of secularisation’.23 According to Lupton, hagiography had to be subsumed into new genres in order to secure its permanent place in literary history as the spiritual mother of many modern genres: in parallel to the classical revival in hagiography, saints’ lives and their motifs were secularised and subsequently turned into a typology

in Sanctity as literature in late medieval Britain
Abstract only
David Geiringer

Catholic women animates a new set of questions about religion, sex and power. Scholars have already moved beyond asking questions which assume that sex and religion were diametrically opposed in the post-war decades. Historians of religion have been roundly warned against falling back on the lingering assumptions of a once totemic ‘secularisation’ theory. Conversely, historians of sexuality have been

in The Pope and the pill
Abstract only
A poetics of hagiographic narration
Eva von Contzen

Thompson succinctly summarises the conflicting forces at work:  ‘The intersection of the secular and the religious offers risky knowledge insofar as it points away from the clearer separations of the early medieval world, but it is a knowledge that points towards the future, in terms of both life and literature’.8 The Scottish Legendary likewise displays such ‘risky knowledge’. More than a century after the Southern compilation, however, it is indicative of the development Thompson foresees from the South English Legendary’s practice of secularisation. The Scottish

in The Scottish Legendary