elements were thought to be having on society and private Constructing a system of education 111 families.5 Church authorities in Scotland realised that securing Catholicism in Scotland would require the establishment of a viable system of education and that those best able to handle the responsibility were the religious communities whose members were equipped to undertake the practical work associated with running schools. The sisters, nuns, priests and brothers would pave the way for widespread religious change by exposing children to an obedient, loyal and

in Creating a Scottish Church
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/11/11 14:46 Page 272 Church, nation and race up immediately after the First World War together with allegations of profiteering, or later in response to financial scandals in Weimar Germany. Yet the ‘Jewish financier’ never sustained the mobilising power enjoyed by the image of the ‘Jewish Bolshevik’. Religious anti-Judaism survived into the age of racial antisemitism and cannot be divorced from modern antisemitism, as the Vatican has suggested in We Remember. References to Christian scripture still served to justify secular Jew-hatred. The observation of We Remember

in Church, nation and race

the servile state, the damage of corruption in politics, and the role of the Catholic Church as the Mother of European civilisation. . . . I hope that his books will be read and pondered for years to come for they are the writings of a great European, a great Christian and scholar.5 Some writers adopted individual aspects of Belloc’s thoughts, while others identified widely with his worldview. Canon William Barry was one of those who agreed in many ways with Belloc. Barry grew up in London’s East End as the son of Irish immigrants and later became Canon of St Chad

in Church, nation and race

3 The recruitment of women religious Women religious were at the centre of the ultramontane campaign to transform Catholicism and bring the national churches under the authority of Rome, and yet many were not ultramontanes. The professional skills they offered, the institutions they founded and the religious authority they possessed enabled them to build a more unified Catholic culture. The sisters who founded the pioneer communities in Scotland were intrepid missionaries dedicated to rebuilding and extending the Catholic Church in a nation dominated by

in Creating a Scottish Church

nobles, academics, students and youth. Furthermore, considering that the future of the Weimar Republic depended on the decisions of a few ‘undemocratic conservatives’ (Michael Mann) in the years 1932 and 1933, among them fellow 04-ChurchNationRace_118-177 120 28/11/11 14:42 Page 120 Church, nation and race travellers of the Catholic right, such as Franz von Papen, the DNVP’s man within the Centre Party9, the worldview and antisemitism of the Catholic right remains important in any enquiry into the early acquiescence of Christian conservatives to the National

in Church, nation and race

were portrayed negatively but the immediate context of anti-Jewish comments and their form. Like Anthony Kauders in his book German Politics and the Jews the following description puts context before numbers, preferring qualitative analysis over bald quantitative statistics.2 England Up to the beginning of the twentieth century Catholic media usually fulfilled one main task. They were primarily designed to supplement a national media which either ignored Catholic news, or stood for principles that ran contrary to the Church’s mission and claim. 02-ChurchNationRace

in Church, nation and race

G. M. DITCHFIELD 4 Church, parliament and national identity, c. 1770–c. 1830 1 G. M. Ditchfield There can be no doubt of the central nature of parliament in debates as to the religious nature of English, and increasingly of British, national identity between 1770 and 1830. The supremacy of statute law carried almost universal acceptance and attempts to influence parliamentary opinion dominated the efforts of those who sought to promote or resist ecclesiastical change. The belief that legislation could influence theological opinion was widespread. When

in Parliaments, nations and identities in Britain and Ireland, 1660–1850

The Elizabethan Church and parliament Chapter 4 The Elizabethan Church and the antiquity of parliament Alexandra Gajda A t the turn of the seventeenth century, members of the Society of Antiquaries debated the age of the English parliament.1 All agreed that parliament had ancient origins, predating the Norman Conquest, with Sir John Doddridge excitably asserting that parliaments had existed in preRoman Britain, in the assemblies of the druids. On 29 November 1604, a less famous exchange occurred, when the Society discussed the origins of those other phenomena

in Writing the history of parliament in Tudor and early Stuart England
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accepted Catholics. It also taught the classics which Logue’s parents thought essential if, as they seemed determined to ensure, their boy was to become a priest.1 He maintained a high academic performance and was transferred to a boarding school in Buncrana in preparation for the Maynooth entrance exam in 1857. Logue 2 Michael Logue & the Catholic Church in Ireland took the test a year early at the age of seventeen. Despite being the youngest candidate, he achieved first place and was accepted into the seminary. The result was by no means certain as parents of other

in Michael Logue and the Catholic Church in Ireland, 1879–1925
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2 Land and politics The Land War The upsurge in political violence after 1879 posed a series of complex problems for the Catholic Church in Ireland. The nature of violence, its scope and scale, and its origin all presented challenges which were in many ways new. The violent protest associated with the land question after 1879 heralded, or was symptomatic of, sweeping political change. Previously, it was quite often simply a matter of condemnation for the Church. Insurrection, such as the Fenian revolt, could be dismissed as the work of a small group of

in Michael Logue and the Catholic Church in Ireland, 1879–1925