Abstract only
John Privilege

condemnation of the British Government in 1920. The bishops accused republicans of attacking their country as if it were a foreign power. They declared that they had no legitimate authority for their campaign and, more significantly, branded the republican movement as being inherently opposed to Catholic doctrine. ‘In spite of their obvious sin and the fact of their unlawful rebellion’, they went on, ‘they still play the role of good Catholics and demand the Sacraments’. Consequently, the bishops moved to cut republicans off from the Church. All those who participated in the

in Michael Logue and the Catholic Church in Ireland, 1879–1925
Politics and theology, 1709–19
Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth

9780719078729_4_004.qxd 11/26/08 10:34 Page 109 Chapter 4 The spectre of High Church: politics and theology, 1709–19 Q ueen Anne’s husband, Prince George of Denmark, died in October 1708. For the queen, whose health had never been robust, the added strain left her susceptible to manoeuvring on the part of her ministers – Whigs temporarily regained the royal ear. Whig resurgence, however, was short-lived as the continuing expense of participating in the War of the Spanish Succession frustrated both Anne and tax-hating Tories such as Robert Harley. Tories

in Deism in Enlightenment England
The polity of the British episcopal churches, 1603–62
Benjamin M. Guyer

‘From the Apostles’ time’ Chapter 2 ‘From the Apostles’ time’: the polity of the British episcopal churches, 1603–62 Benjamin M. Guyer A midst controversy, armed conflict and bloodshed, in the seventeenth century episcopacy became a defining feature of the Church of England and its Irish and Scottish counterparts. This chapter makes an extended methodological argument about the importance of attending to the longue durée by setting debates about episcopal polity in two broad contexts.1 First, and more broadly, is the confessional framework provided by

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
Abstract only
Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
Elliot Vernon

Introduction Chapter 1 Introduction: church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66 Elliot Vernon T he topic of church polity is one of the ‘Cinderella’ subjects of early modern religious history, late to the ball but entrancing none the less.1 The chapters presented in this volume argue that the topic of church polity was a crucial factor in the politics of the British Atlantic world during the mid-seventeenth century. By ‘church polity’ is meant the manner in which the church is structured and governed. It is related to the term

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
An exploration of church polity and the governance of the region’s churches
Francis J. Bremer

The New England way reconsidered Chapter 8 The New England way reconsidered: an exploration of church polity and the governance of the region’s churches Francis J. Bremer N ewly arrived in Boston after three decades as the spiritual leader of the New Haven church and colony, John Davenport welcomed an invitation from the deputies of the Massachusetts General Court to deliver the annual election-day sermon in May 1669. Mounting a defence of the congregational principles on which the region had been founded, he warned of changes that would lead to ‘an end of

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
Autobiography, suffering and professions of faith
Sarah Ward Clavier

Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic Chapter 12 The Restoration episcopate and the interregnum: autobiography, suffering and professions of faith Sarah Ward Clavier1 R estoration bishops came in all flavours: Laudians, Calvinists and those who have apparently left so little indication of their religious views that they still remain a mystery to posterity. They ranged from authoritarian micromanagers to those who seemed barely interested in the business of their individual dioceses. On the whole, however, it is difficult to imagine the events of

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
Joseph Hardwick

the focus of missionary work in America’s Episcopal Church since at least the mid-1830s. 1 In Britain, Tractarianism helped Anglicans gain a clearer sense of the role, responsibilities and significance of the bishop. Political shifts – notably the gradual erosion of the old idea of a privileged establishment – also focused attention on the centrality of episcopacy for Anglican identity. For many Anglicans it

in An Anglican British World
Chad Van Dixhoorn

Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic Chapter 6 Presbyterian ecclesiologies at the Westminster assembly Chad Van Dixhoorn ECCLESIASTICAL CONTEXTS T he Westminster assembly was in many ways the high point of the puritan experiment. The special morning service on 1 July 1643 saw the nave of Westminster Abbey thronged with supporters of a godly reformation. Long prayed-for alterations in worship, clarifications in doctrine and renovations in church government were finally within reach. While continuing reformation was to proceed on all three fronts

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
Andrew Sneddon

6 The Bishop of Down and Connor and the established Church and state in Ireland, 1721–39 Despite a recent flurry of interest in the Church of Ireland clergy,1 as T. C. Barnard has pointed out, ‘the characteristics and functions of this profession can only be guessed until the origins, education, careers and wealth of its members have been clarified through prosopographical studies of particular cohorts of graduates and ordinands, and of individual dioceses’.2 The latter study would be particularly welcome in the case of the diocese of Down and Connor, upon

in Witchcraft and Whigs
The Welsh experience of church polity, 1640–60
Stephen K. Roberts

Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic Chapter 4 ‘One of the least things in religion’: the Welsh experience of church polity, 1640–60 Stephen K. Roberts T he condition of the protestant ministry in Wales was considered as deplorable at the restoration of the monarchy as it had been on the eve of the civil war nearly twenty years previously, and the condition of Wales, both in social and religious terms, remained generally marginal to the concerns of successive regimes at Westminster. Yet controversy over the governance of the church in Wales was

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66