Abstract only
Peter Shirlow, Jonathan Tonge, James McAuley and Catherine McGlynn

The significant decline in state and paramilitary violence in Northern Ireland has been part guided by politically motivated prisoners who have played a vital role in conflict transformation. Former prisoners have contributed to the development of alternative modes of thinking that have challenged once-dominant militarist ideologies. The actors involved in these discursive shifts

in Abandoning historical conflict?
Stuart Kaufman

2504Chap3 7/4/03 3:53 pm Page 48 3 Ethnic conflict and Eurasian security Stuart Kaufman What role does ethnic conflict play in Eurasian security affairs? Just breaking this question down into its component parts uncovers a vast array of apparent influences. Ethnic conflict is, first of all, clearly a cause of internal conflict and insecurity, as demonstrated by the problems in Bosnia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Cyprus, Georgia, Chechnya and Mountainous Karabagh. Furthermore, it is a key cause of international security problems, as the above list of ethnic civil

in Limiting institutions?
Stephen Emerson and Hussein Solomon

8 Resource conflict and the environment Resource conflict and environmental degradation are in reality two-sides of the same security challenge coin. Both address the issue of natural resource abundance and scarcity and how societies deal with these problems and their implications, but from vastly different perspectives. While the first addresses access and control of existing natural resources, the second addresses the environmental impact of the misuse of or declining resources. Regardless of the perspective, both present a serious threat to African peace and

in African security in the twenty-first century
Abstract only
Bernadette C. Hayes and Ian McAllister

It is increasingly accepted that religion is a cause of many of the world’s violent conflicts. The vast majority of contemporary conflicts are intrastate conflicts and involve issues of religious, national or ethnic identity. Although religious conflicts in general have been less common in the post-Second World War era than nonreligious conflicts – or ethnonational

in Conflict to peace
Peter Shirlow, Jonathan Tonge, James McAuley and Catherine McGlynn

The contribution of paramilitary prisoners to conflict transformation remains a surprisingly under-stated aspect of the Northern Ireland peace process. Amid the focus upon an ambitious consociational deal between nationalist and unionist politicians and examination of the roles played by the British, Irish and American governments, the actions of those who ‘fought the war

in Abandoning historical conflict?
Bernadette C. Hayes and Ian McAllister

A common observation in comparative politics is that divisions within a society that cross-cut one another lead to moderation and compromise, while divisions that reinforce one another lead to extremism and conflict. This observation was first made when the stable, moderate, pluralist politics of the Scandinavian democracies was contrasted with the relatively unstable, divisive

in Conflict to peace
Critically interpreting the past
Kirk Simpson

Simpson 05 19/1/09 11:43 Page 100 5 Memorialisation in post-conflict societies Critically interpreting the past Introduction Throughout societies like Northern Ireland that have experienced the deleterious effects of political violence, the creation of fitting memorials should be integral to the efforts of transitional policymakers to combat widespread ambivalence towards the suffering of victims and the legacy of conflict; and also to combat the malign efforts of those who would seek to colonise history with recourse to partisan, exclusionary material

in Truth recovery in Northern Ireland
Bernadette C. Hayes and Ian McAllister

At the heart of all efforts to bring about reconciliation in post-conflict societies is the question of how to deal with the victims of violence. The resolution of this issue is often considered the litmus test of a successful peace endeavour for societies emerging from conflict. Irrespective of whether restorative or retributive forms of justice are applied to a conflict, the recognition

in Conflict to peace
Jo Berry and Patrick Magee’s Facing the Enemy
Verity Combe

24 Performance practices and conflict resolution: Jo Berry and Patrick Magee’s Facing the Enemy Verity Combe It has been said that ‘for every one year of conflict we need ten years of reconciliation’.1 Contemporary conflict resolution differs from the more traditional kinds because it now emphasises post-conflict processes that generate solutions and is much more inter-disciplinary in its scope. Conflict resolution is both an academic and a practical field and a branch of international relations dedicated to alleviating and illuminating sources of conflict

in The Northern Ireland Troubles in Britain
Abstract only
Peter Shirlow, Jonathan Tonge, James McAuley and Catherine McGlynn

compromises. In our view, none of these compromises were sustainable without backing from ‘combatants’ in the conflict. As such, any account of the peace process which failed to take account of why so many former prisoners supported the 1998 Good Friday Agreement was incomplete. Moreover, it was necessary to ascertain whether this backing for the peace process involved renunciation of previous articles of

in Abandoning historical conflict?