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Open Access (free)
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

Main characteristics In the nineteenth century, a humanitarian justification was invoked by governments, press, public opinion and international jurists from the three-power intervention in the Greek War of Independence (1821–31) through to the more controversial US intervention in Cuba in 1898, but also for other instances short of the use of armed force in humanitarian plights. The doctrine of humanitarian intervention was at its zenith in

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

Our criteria for selecting the armed humanitarian interventions of the nineteenth century are the following (which conform with the understanding in the long nineteenth century, as elucidated in chapters 4 and 5 ): (1) governmental onslaught against unarmed people or atrocities by both sides in a protracted internal war; (2) humanitarian concern, that is, stopping the ‘effusion of blood’, as one of the main reasons and official justifications for intervening; (3

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

full membership; and (5) questioning the distinction or the standard. We will refer to the views of key publicists, all of them also influential in the humanitarian intervention debate (see chapter 4 ). Among those presuming permanent exclusion, the US diplomat Henry Wheaton (the pioneer of international law in his country together with James Kent), in his widely read treatise, with eight editions up to 1866 42 (translated into French, Italian, Spanish as well as Chinese

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Stephen Benedict Dyson

4 The Kosovo and Sierra Leone interventions ‘There is only one person arguing for ground troops’ to go into Kosovo, commented a senior NATO official as the alliance pondered its options, ‘and that is Tony Blair’.1 Blair was indeed alone during late April and May 1999 in pushing forcefully for an invasion of Kosovo to halt Serbian ethnic cleansing operations, and his stance, which was judged by some to be close to ‘messianic’,2 provoked high anger from President Clinton, ‘widespread bafflement’ from the French,3 and a questioning of his judgment from some cabinet

in The Blair identity
Peter Shapely

Shapely 03 2/8/07 01:33 Page 85 3 Civic culture, voluntarism and council intervention Across the nineteenth century, Manchester city council’s participation in housing was restricted to occasional byelaws, producing health reports and providing paving, street lighting and a clean water supply. By the end of the century it was gradually getting directly involved by reconditioning properties, limited slum clearance and building a small number of flats and cottages. However, although the case for municipal action in housing policy was being made, the council

in The politics of housing

The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs is an exciting, new open access journal hosted jointly by The Humanitarian Affairs Team at Save the Children UK, and Centre de Réflexion sur l’Action et les Savoirs Humanitaires MSF (Paris) and the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute at the University of Manchester. It will contribute to current thinking around humanitarian governance, policy and practice with academic rigour and political courage. The journal will challenge contributors and readers to think critically about humanitarian issues that are often approached from reductionist assumptions about what experience and evidence mean. It will cover contemporary, historical, methodological and applied subject matters and will bring together studies, debates and literature reviews. The journal will engage with these through diverse online content, including peer reviewed articles, expert interviews, policy analyses, literature reviews and ‘spotlight’ features.

Our rationale can be summed up as follows: the sector is growing and is facing severe ethical and practical challenges. The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs will provide a space for serious and inter-disciplinary academic and practitioner exchanges on pressing issues of international interest.

The journal aims to be a home and platform for leading thinkers on humanitarian affairs, a place where ideas are floated, controversies are aired and new research is published and scrutinised. Areas in which submissions will be considered include humanitarian financing, migrations and responses, the history of humanitarian aid, failed humanitarian interventions, media representations of humanitarianism, the changing landscape of humanitarianism, the response of states to foreign interventions and critical debates on concepts such as resilience or security.

France and the emergence of the responsibility to protect (2000–2004)
Eglantine Staunton

At the end of the 1990s, the international community questioned how to promote human rights without endangering state sovereignty. In response, the early 2000s saw the emergence of a new concept, R2P, in order to allow states to continue protecting beyond their borders, while addressing the issues raised by humanitarian intervention. 1 During this period President Jacques Chirac was in power thanks to his re-election in 2002. 2 Between 1997 and

in France, humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect
Abstract only
Eglantine Staunton

particular, Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – more commonly known as the BRICS) (see for example Vaughn and Dunne 2015 ; Ziegler 2016 ). As a result, even when studies stop to look at France, it is to focus on particular interventions, in specific geographical domains and historical moments. For instance, when it comes to analysing the emergence and development of humanitarian intervention during the 1990s, authors such as Allen and Styan ( 2000 ), Kroslak ( 2007 ) and Zic ( 2000 ) help us better understand France's involvement in specific humanitarian

in France, humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect
Eglantine Staunton

simply provide logistical support to the UN intervention (in Soares 2012 ). However, after France co-drafted Resolution 2085 in December 2012, which “authorise[d] the deployment of an African-led International Support Mission in Mali … to support the Malian authorities in their primary responsibility to protect the population” (UN Security Council 2012 ), the President announced a French intervention in January 2013 (Hollande 2013a ). A few hours earlier, the French deployment began through Opération Serval . This shift of position can be

in France, humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect
Eglantine Staunton

As explained in the Introduction, investigating France's relationship to human protection over time requires analysing a tale of two norms where the first is France's domestic norm of human protection, and the second is the dominant international principle or norm of human protection at the time – humanitarian intervention during the 1990s and R2P since the 2000s. Although fascinating, this task is quite challenging from a theoretical and methodological point of view for two reasons. First, it calls for a framework that allows the

in France, humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect