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Writing social engagement 1880–1921

This volume is the first to bring together research on the life and work of the author, activist, and traveller Margaret Harkness, who wrote under the pseudonym ‘John Law’. The collection contextualises Harkness’s political project of observing and recording the lives and priorities of the working classes and urban poor alongside the broader efforts of philanthropists, political campaigners, journalists, and novelists who sought to bring the plight of marginalised communities to light at the end of the nineteenth century. It argues for a recognition of Harkness’s importance in providing testimony to the social and political crises that led to the emergence of British socialism and labour politics during this period. This collection includes considerations of Harkness’s work in London’s East End at the end of the nineteenth century, but moves into the twentieth century and beyond Britain’s borders to examine the significance of her global travel for the purpose of investigating international political trends. This collection gives substance to women’s social engagement and political involvement in a period prior to their formal enfranchisement, and offers insight into the ways this effected shifts in literary style and subject. In offering a detailed picture of Harkness’s own life and illuminating the lives and work of her contemporaries, this volume enriches critical understanding of the complex and dynamic world of the long nineteenth century.

Or, W. H. Auden and history

This book discusses W. H. Auden's poetry, and other poetry of the modern era; some of it concerns Auden himself. Auden was particularly important for thinking about the relationship between the extraordinary and the everyday as experienced by historical actors and in the histories written about them. Discussing the twentieth-century development of recording and writing systems among the Vai people of Liberia, anthropologist Jack Goody noted that several Vai records had been compiled by men who had worked as cooks at some point. To employ a poetical maid was a fashionable thing to do and literacy in a cook was certainly a useful commodity. The book explores to what did Auden pay homage to in 'Homage to Clio'; and why might a poet evoke the Muse of History. Auden wrote a number of poems about historical events; two are famous for his later renunciation of their historiography. 'Spain 1937' was about a civil war that had already been designated 'historical'. He had spent time in Spain, was witness to violence perpetrated by both sides during the Civil War. Historiography is to history as poetics is to poetry. In Homage to Clio, the poet reveals the Muse of History as a blank-faced girl, always, forever, present when anything happens, but with absolutely nothing to say. The book explores whether Auden's Historia is silent on the page as well as mute in her person.

Docudrama on film and television
Author: Derek Paget

Docudrama has become centrally important not only in television production but also in film. They require pre-production research and this is a key marker of difference between docudrama and other kinds of drama. In its emphasis on personality, modern docudrama adheres to a US 'made-for-TV movie' mode that Todd Gitlin has described as ' little personal stories that executives think a mass audience will take as revelations of the contemporary'. This book outlines the main legal and regulatory issues that concern docudrama. The sheer proliferation of words and phases coined to categorise forms that mix drama and documentary is in itself remarkable. Phrases, compound nouns and noun coinages have been drawn mainly from four root words: documentary, drama, fact, and fiction. The book discusses the form's principal codes and conventions to which people in a media-literate environment respond, and that they recognise prior to categorising what they watch. Cultures are living things, condensing around 'key words'. Such words mark out points of interest, contestation and anxiety. Griersonian documentary actively embraced an artfulness always likely to be at odds with the recording of 'actuality'. The history of factual drama replays in microcosm the essential differences in emphases between the British and American television systems. Societies under threat from shadowy 'terrorist' organisations offered new templates for the docudramas that eventually fuelled 1990s 'co-pros' of interest to audiences on both sides of the Atlantic. The current spectrum of 'intergeneric hybridisation' in film and television can be represented graphically.

Technology and spiritualism in nineteenth to twenty-first-century art and culture
Editors: Sas Mays and Neil Matheson

Within the visual arts, speculation concerning the paranormal, haunting, spiritualism, and spirit photography expanded enormously in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Focusing on people's complex relationship with technology, this book explores our culture's continued fascination with the spectral, the ghostly and the paranormal. Informed by history and the visual tradition of spiritualism and psychical research, it cites that tradition within our contemporary concerns, such as landscape and environment, and recent technological developments. The book discusses the role of vitalism in contemporary theory, reflecting on what Bergson's interest in spiritualism suggests about the historical and theoretical complexities that lie behind the current uses of vitalism. It examines the twitching gestural engagements with a variety of devices, instruments, and technologies, including the typewriter, the pianola, the slate, and the phonograph. The book highlights that spiritualist phenomena are the result of mendacity on the one side and credulous belief on the other; Dada photomontage the result of painfully keen-eyed despair and a powerful drive to experiment. Resiting spirit photography and the production of 'ectoplasm' within the theatrical tradition of melodrama, the book considers spiritualist manifestations in terms of 'performances for camera'. It pays attention to exhibitions, staged in galleries in the UK and the United States between 2003 and 2007, which paired spirit photographs with examples of contemporary art photography. Finally, the book considers various spectral emanations moving across space and time, and across different discourses the work of John Ruskin, to discuss the relations between haunting and ecological catastrophe.

Patricia Lambert-Zazulak

, so that nothing will be lost for future generations of researchers. The concept of the International Ancient Egyptian Mummy Tissue Bank has a crucial role in fulfilling these objectives. It is important for the conservation of ancient human remains that they be disturbed as little as possible, and therefore the storage of tissue in the tissue bank will mean that a mummy needs to be X-rayed, be endoscoped and have tissue samples taken only once in order for the tissue to be available in the tissue bank and carefully selected for future work. The central recording of

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Heather Norris Nicholson

clubs suspended all activities during wartime, and stopped subscription charges for called-up members, amateur practice continued where circumstances permitted. 85 The hobby press regarded club activity on the home front as a contribution to national morale and public information. Recording wartime experiences was also recognised as having future personal and wider significance. 86 Cine footage made during active service seems infrequent as

in Amateur film
Open Access (free)
The complexities of collaborative authorship
Paul Henley

the quality of the sound recording. Although the underlying methodology may have been highly participatory, the films themselves are only minimally reflexive: outside the context of interviews, there are only occasional references to the presence of the film-makers. In fact, even the interviews are more like oral testimonies than interviews in the sense that only on one occasion does one hear a question, and even that is posed by a local person rather than by the film-makers. In her account of making these films, Sarah Elder acknowledges that the

in Beyond observation
Racial capitalism and workplace resistance
Ben Rogaly

expressed nostalgia for the gangs as we sat recording her oral history interview in the sunshine in the garden of her terraced home in the centre of Peterborough in 2011. She later channelled the emotion of her recollections into a new poem on the subject.50 When larger, more commercial temporary work agencies specialising in international migrant workers became predominant from the 1990s, Keely had seen her family move out of the labour-supplying business because, she believed, it became impossible to both compete and be humane: And they were quite … the gangmasters used

in Stories from a migrant city

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is one of the most popular novels in western literature. It has been adapted and re-assembled in countless forms, from Hammer Horror films to young-adult books and bandes dessinées. Beginning with the idea of the ‘Frankenstein Complex’, this edited collection provides a series of creative readings that explore the elaborate intertextual networks that make up the novel’s remarkable afterlife. It broadens the scope of research on Frankenstein while deepening our understanding of a text that, 200 years after its original publication, continues to intrigue and terrify us in new and unexpected ways.

Rethinking art, media, and the audio-visual contract
Author: Ming-Yuen S. Ma

There is no soundtrack is a specific yet expansive study of sound tactics deployed in experimental media art today. It analyses how audio and visual elements interact and produce meaning, drawing from works by contemporary media artists ranging from Chantal Akerman, to Nam June Paik, to Tanya Tagaq. It then links these analyses to discussions on silence, voice, noise, listening, the soundscape, and other key ideas in sound studies. In making these connections, the book argues that experimental media art – avant-garde film, video art, performance, installation, and hybrid forms – produces radical and new audio-visual relationships that challenge and destabilize the visually-dominated fields of art history, contemporary art criticism, cinema and media studies, and cultural studies as well as the larger area of the human sciences. This book directly addresses what sound studies scholar Jonathan Sterne calls ‘visual hegemony’. It joins a growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship that is collectively sonifying the study of culture while defying the lack of diversity within the field by focusing on practitioners from transnational and diverse backgrounds. Therefore, the media artists discussed in this book are of interest to scholars and students who are exploring aurality in related disciplines including gender and feminist studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, environmental analysis, and architecture. As such, There Is No Soundtrack makes meaningful connections between previously disconnected bodies of scholarship to build new, more complex and reverberating frameworks for the study of art, media, and sound.