A Focus on Community Engagement

resistance ( Abramowitz et al. , 2017 ; Faye, 2017 ; Gillespie et al. , 2016 ; Wilkinson and Fairhead, 2017 ). As we will show, cadets sociaux challenged official CVVs and have retained the legitimate authority to carry out community surveillance and community defence. In doing so, they reprised the monitoring and protection role they played during the Liberian and Sierra Leonean conflicts in the 2000s, when the Guinean army was seen as ineffective in protecting its own people against the incursion of rebels from neighbouring countries ( McGovern, 2017 ). In July

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

behaviourism within the academy predates the computational turn, it has been enhanced through this development ( Rouvroy, 2012 ). Optimising individual behaviour and experience lies at the cybernetic heart of late-capitalism. Employing armies of practitioners, it embraces everything from moulding consumer preference and influencing voter behaviour to shaping the choices and experience of disaster-affected groups ( HPG, 2018 ). The privileging of behaviourism over more conceptual approaches to understanding ( Anderson, 2007 ) is reflected in the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

has received considerable attention from historians of British popular culture, British India, and – to a lesser extent – the British Army, this story bridges the concerns of all three. The Rebellion was, in fact, a pivotal moment for the redefinition of attitudes – both public and official – about the military, empire, race and masculinity. 2 As a military crisis of truly massive proportions, it

in Martial races
Abstract only

Introduction The study of the auxiliary forces of the United Kingdom is an important one, and this is in no small part down to Britain’s historical reliance on sea power and a small standing army with Imperial obligations. This left the need for an amateur force at home both to protect against invasion from a foreign aggressor and to keep internal order within the country itself. This was carried out through use of the amateur forces as an aid to the civil power and through a form of social control by encouraging participation within the various amateur bodies

in The Irish amateur military tradition in the British Army, 1854–1992
Abstract only

Ireland, and were at their most pronounced for the militia in the 1860s, for the UHG during the Second World War, and for the UDR thereafter. For the yeomanry, OTC, and VTC, no such political problems existed; this was largely because they were predominantly made up of Protestants, so a lingering threat of nationalist subversion was not a consideration. Conversely, this Protestant domination in the UHG and UDR threatened to create political problems, particularly risking embroiling the army in a sectarian issue, something which the British authorities wished to avoid at

in The Irish amateur military tradition in the British Army, 1854–1992

4 Discipline and morale The discipline and morale of the amateur forces in Ireland were varied. Certainly, the biggest problems existed in the militia, and acts of disobedience became a common occurrence, especially towards the end of annual training, whilst the perceived threat of Fenianism in the latter half of the nineteenth century further accentuated problems. Importantly, these acts of indiscipline became more infrequent as time progressed, and this broadly fits in with the steady improvement of the army’s behaviour towards the latter Victorian era.1

in The Irish amateur military tradition in the British Army, 1854–1992
Abstract only

overshadowed in the (now) Republic. In Ulster, however, the commemoration of Irish service in the British Army has remained in the forefront to a much larger extent. The study of the image, both at the time, and long after its existence, is important in relation to Ireland, given Ireland’s delicate position within the British Empire. Much like many other aspects of auxiliary forces in Ireland, an evolution was experienced, which was closely linked with improvements in discipline. Upon its reincarnation in 1854, it is clear that the image of the Irish militia was at a low

in The Irish amateur military tradition in the British Army, 1854–1992
Abstract only
J.W.M. Hichberger
in Images of the army
Abstract only
The Victorian army and its use of railways

The railway represented one of pivotal technological developments of the nineteenth century. This book reviews the way in which the British army exploited the potential of railways from the 'dawn of the railway age' to the outbreak of the First World War. It explores the use of railways when the army was acting in aid of the civil power, as a factor in the planning for home defence, and as an increasingly efficient means of supporting the army on active service. If the early Victorian army welcomed railways as an ancillary means of responding to domestic emergencies, it encountered similar challenges in fulfilling its role in home defence. Over nearly thirty years from the Crimean War to the intervention in Egypt, the Victorian army both experimented with railways and observed the employment of railways. The Sudan Military Railway was regarded as 'astounding in conception'. The book reveals that the army monitored the use of railways in foreign wars, experimented in the use of railways within rear areas, designed and built railways for strategic defence in India, and later exploited railways to transform the prospects of military success in the Sudan and South Africa. The Victorian army demonstrated a capacity to integrate the railway into its logistic planning, to grasp the imperative of operational management, and to envisage it as a key element in mobilisation and strategic planning.

Abstract only
Radical political thought in the English Revolution

The Leveller movement of the 1640s campaigned for religious toleration and a radical remaking of politics after the English civil war. This book challenges received ideas about the Levellers as social contract theorists and Leveller thought as a mere radicalization of parliamentarian thought, analysing the writings of the Leveller leaders John Lilburne, Richard Overton, and William Walywn to show that that the Levellers’ originality lay in their subtle and unexpected combination of different strands within parliamentarianism. The first part of the book offers a systematic analysis of different aspects of the Levellers’ developing political thought, considering their accounts of the origins of government, their developing views on the relationship between parliament and people, their use of the language of the law, and their understanding of the relationship between religious liberty and political life. Two concluding chapters examine the Levellers’ relationship with the New Model Army and the influence of the Levellers on the republican thought of the 1650s. The book takes full account of revisionist and post-revisionist scholarship, and contributes to historical debates on the development of radical and republican politics in the civil war period, the nature of tolerationist thought, the significance of the Leveller movement, and the extent of Leveller influence in the ranks of the New Model Army.