Search results

neutralize such images. Indeed, as the Opel case demonstrates, they ‘encouraged’ national identity projections even where corporate internationalization dynamics were weak. One aspect of this was that British delegates often voiced quite radical criticism of the German works council system, which even to the new generation of Opel union activists seemed to neglect the benefits of council rights for worker representation. 84 In their turn, Opel delegates displayed a

in Paradoxes of internationalization
What really ended in 1989?

5 Social democracy forgets its identity: what really ended in 1989? The collapse of communism in the Soviet Union in 1989 precipitated triumphalist hurrahs from Francis Fukuyama, who was moved to project the “End of History” as such, and the global triumph of liberal democracy. Fukuyama, foreseeing the death of communism everywhere, projected a world that could at last transcend ideology: he anticipated a harmonious future shaped by peace, democracy, and free markets. Far from being an ideology itself, Fukuyama touted the American version of liberalism – and

in The great forgetting
Abstract only
A new politics of protest?

little of this work has been undertaken in relation to the potential within social movements more broadly. Furthermore, use of CMC by environmentalists has contributed to the globalising of the movement as evidenced by the increasing number of anti-corporate globalisation protests. The correspondingly diffuse aims, tactics and targets of activists, and the problems of generating collective identities in such large-scale interaction and among contentious participants, are only just beginning to permeate social movement literature. Traditionally it had been assumed that

in Cyberprotest
Abstract only

advertising stopped using the image of black people to sell products. Corporate advertisers, however, with interests in the colonies, could not simply ignore the changing scene. The conflict was not simply between coloniser and colonised, but also between capitalism and communism. In projecting their involvement in the former colonies, the corporate advertisers presented themselves as catalysts of change. In

in Imperial persuaders
Abstract only

Conclusion One of the interviewees who participated in an oral history project entitled Religion and Worship on the Home Front in 2006 was an elderly nun who had grown up in Glasgow. For a question designed to illuminate perceptions of national identity, when asked whether she thought that the Scots who had fought as soldiers, sailors and airmen and those who had toiled in the factories and plants at home had done it for Scotland or for Britain, her response was this: ‘Well if they were doing it for anybody, it would be for Scotland rather than Britain’, and

in Creating a Scottish Church

corporate identities. They looked for representations which would suggest their concern for world-wide economic development. While representing Commonwealth and colonial nations, none of the companies mentioned the term ‘Empire’ in any of their advertisements. In some ways we can see these advertisements as representing a negotiated political change while maintaining economic

in Imperial persuaders
Abstract only
Refiguring Dracula in a neoliberal age

marketise their identities (or self-brands) in the most productive and lucrative manner. While the opportunity of prosperity and entrepreneurship might have been viewed with optimism in the pre-recession decades, post-2008 neoliberalism’s market-driven logic appears less as an individual entitlement than a compassionless corporate contract that absolves debt-ridden governments from

in Neoliberal Gothic
Abstract only

, but a difference of analytical perspective. It means looking at Ford and GM not primarily as exemplifying the increasingly embattled situation of a specific industry, but as representing a form of corporate organization, which – while historically reaching back to the nineteenth century (see Wilkins, 1991 ; Jones, 2005 ) – has grown exponentially since the 1960s (see Dicken, 2007 ; Dunning and Lundan, 2008 ), and which is widely perceived as heralding the shift from an

in Paradoxes of internationalization
Abstract only
Status, identity, and role

2 Citizenship II: status, identity, and role Cosmopolitanism and after Because the standard ‘nation-state’ accounts of citizenship are increasingly being found wanting, interest in the idea of global citizenship has, since the early 1990s, resurged. As Nussbaum reminds us, the essence of this idea is not new but revisits the ancient Stoic doctrine of cosmopolitanism – ‘cosmopolite’ meaning, precisely, a citizen of the world. In advocating cosmopolitanism as the remedy for narrowness of vision Nussbaum describes such a citizen as a person dwelling both in the

in Supranational Citizenship
Abstract only

time. Chief among these, I shall argue, is that autobiography holds possibilities for self-examination and self-expression, both of which are compromised by the pace and instantaneity of neoliberal productivity. Autobiography offers also a linguistically based means of healing the discourse-induced stress caused by corporate messages urging particular sanctioned identities that uphold economic growth in Western economies (see Chapter 1). It handles the process of selfmaking and the contradictions and resolutions facing the ‘I’ in 07c-Telling Tales-174-197 23

in Telling tales