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Labour migration policy change in Spain

4 Case study one: labour migration policy change in Spain Introduction At the end of 2003 a group of migration experts gathered to publish a short note on the Spanish government’s immigration policy. The text described policy as ethically obscene, politically dangerous, juridically inadmissible, and summed it up as ‘legal apartheid’.1 The ‘Madrid Manifesto’ was an unprecedented castigation of government policy, and was a direct reaction to the change in direction that had been taken post-2000, in particular the legislative reform of November 2003 passed by the

in Managing labour migration in Europe
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frames on labour migration shift and change. The work provides evidence of an increasing but variegated role for expertise in policy formation and demonstrates how, and in what ways, national modes of policy-making intervene to resist or facilitate policy convergence via particular types of communities and coalitions. The approach of the work addresses the observation that we often know very little about the flow of ideas, and what actually drives politicians and policy-makers to make decisions about immigration (Sciortino 2000) – decisions that ultimately have far

in Managing labour migration in Europe
Refugee women in Britain and France

Allwood 02 24/2/10 2 10:27 Page 49 Migration contexts, demographic and social characteristics: refugee women in Britain and France This chapter introduces the reader to the landscape of international migration within which female refugee migrants are positioned. Its aim is twofold. First, it gives an overview of inward migration flows into Britain and France while bearing in mind both the general European context and processes of feminisation which have occurred over the last 50 years. Second, it presents, as fully as available data allows, the demographic

in Refugee women in Britain and France

2 Histories of ethnicity, nation and migration Nationhood, ethnicity and migration have been linked in south-east Europe, including the Yugoslav region, since the descendants of Slav clans who migrated there from Central Asia in the sixth to eighth centuries CE and others living there who came to share their collective identity started to understand themselves as nations – however long ago or recently that might be (Fine 2006 ). Ottoman rule in south-east Europe, moreover, both represented and caused further migration. The region's nineteenth

in Race and the Yugoslav region

Part III Migration, transnationalism and borders Implicit in the very idea of bringing together the work of women filmmakers from Hispanic and Lusophone contexts is the notion that these cultural categories must necessarily be viewed in terms of their migratory and transnational histories. This is so simply by dint of the vast geographical and geopolitical spaces and networks that constitute the Hispanic

in Hispanic and Lusophone women filmmakers
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5 The discontinuity Continuity? The Isle of Man and West Sussex stories were minuscule pieces of the intricate jigsaw puzzle of international migration that stretched across centuries and continents. The Manx and Sussex people who left Britain in the 1820s had particular local reasons and special circumstances, often deeply personal states of mind. They are frequently fascinating individual narratives. Yet these emigrants were not unique, and their similarities with people on the move from the rest of the British Isles, perhaps from Europe in general, is

in The genesis of international mass migration

continent. Emigration came within the reach of millions more than ever before. It was as if the infrastructure itself was not merely the facilitator of emigration but its actual primary generator. But Europe was also following a prior template. Dudley Baines asked the critical question: ‘In what sense can we think of all European migration as part of a single, although complex, phenomenon?’1 Britain itself was part of Europe and part of the vast exodus at the centre of this study, part of the 60 million who left in the long nineteenth century, an exodus which eventually

in The genesis of international mass migration

17 A general view of the origins of modern emigration and the British case Mentalities and motivations What moved millions of mainly quite ordinary British and Irish people to embark on long-distance migrations? This is a classic, indeed generic, historical question. It involves peering into the minds of vast numbers of people, which is impossible; it is extremely difficult even to count them, still more so to categorise them. Their minds may be unknowable. E.P. Thompson, the modern historian who did most to enter the collective psychology of the labouring

in The genesis of international mass migration
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14 The Irish case Ireland to the fore The first crescendo of mass international migration came in the mid-1840s and was disproportionately Irish. Ireland exhibited in the starkest terms the fundamental forces which generated exoduses out of Europe, and therefore Ireland requires particular attention. Moreover by the middle of the nineteenth century, Ireland had become a prolific supplier of emigrants to the New Worlds and to the rest of Britain, and remained so for the next half century. It yielded far more emigrants per capita than the other parts of the

in The genesis of international mass migration

10 The Australasian case A new theatre of British emigration The transition to mass emigration by the 1830s coincided with the extension of the British emigrant flows to their furthest extremity, the Antipodes. Australia became a new theatre of migration which reflected the new circumstances of expatriation. It was colonised from the British Isles in two distinct phases – from the 1780s by convicts and then, in new free mode, in the 1830s. These distinctive flows coincided with decisive changes in Britain itself, exposing the mechanisms and propensities as they

in The genesis of international mass migration