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The case of Ortobello Urban Garden

the territorial dimension of urban politics (O’Laughlin, 1973; Pirie, 1983; Reynaud, 1981; Soja, 2009). In early 1980s, the interest in investigating spatial justice considerably increased and scholars actively approached the topic. The term spatial justice became almost exclusively associated with the work of geographers and planners in Los Angeles (Soja, 2009). Los Angeles was the most important metropolitan region in the United States considering the production of unjust geographies and spatial structures of privileges. These characteristics have played a

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice

4 Documentary map-making and film-making in Pat Collins’s Tim Robinson: Connemara Derek Gladwin A map is a sustained attempt upon an unattainable goal, the complete comprehension by an individual of a tract of space that will be individualized into a place by that attempt.1 – Tim Robinson In sum a film is a map, and … its symbolic and political effectiveness is a function of its identity as a cartographic diagram.2 – Tom Conley Documenting through map-making and film-making In the documentary film Tim Robinson: Connemara (2011), director Pat Collins spotlights

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Open Access (free)
Digital photography and cartography in Wolfgang Weileder’s Atlas

a conception of experience across a space of time’ that was a reaction to the contemporary destruction of space at the hands of increased speed (Harvey, 1989: 267). Harvey diagnoses this capitalist-fuelled modernist transformation in the relationship between time and space as ‘time-space compression’, and notes that the second, intensive round of it emerged with postmodernism (Harvey, 1989: 283). This latest period of the ‘time-space compression’ is identified by Harvey as ‘an intense phase’ that has had a ‘disorienting and disruptive impact upon political

in Time for mapping
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Critically evaluating the role of the Incredible Edible movement in the UK

worldwide. From the ‘trendy’ and relatively ‘soft’ intransigent political movements in North America and Europe, to those pursuing it for survival in Africa and other global South nations, the activity is very broad (Adams et  al., 2014; Reynolds, 2008). In the case of Africa, most of the UA practised across the continent could be viewed as guerrilla gardening, as city authorities and national governments often discourage the practice of UA (Chipungu et al., 2013). In a similar manner, residents of Havana, Cuba –​one of the most frequently cited exemplars of UA

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
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Ireland’s ‘ABC of earth wonders’

perceive them, and such perceptions filter through an unreliable medium of language. Maps, then, are metaphoric ways of organising, orientating and then controlling all types of experiences, whether they are personal, social or cultural.22 Robinson recognised early in his cartographic practice that the ‘making of a map … is many things as well as a work of art, and among others it is a political, or more exactly an ideological, act’.23 He maintains that the ‘old Ordnance Survey shows this clearly’.24 Mapping projects not only claim territory, but they also 5 6 Derek

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Matrixial gazing in Tim Robinson’s walk-art-text practice

, 211 212 Moynagh Sullivan they remain present to her in her understanding that ‘maybe they were given to me for a reason, like I was given them to be touched on a physical level. So they’re a kind of gift.’52 Here she honours this time so often symbolised and foreclosed in our understanding of being a human subject – from both the perceptions of the child and the mother, and from the wider social and political fabrics in which we live. Talking about Omey she says, ‘we often go there. It’s a lovely peaceful place, a real place of healing. They’re buried in the sand

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Irish farming knowledges

productivist paradigm underpinned by global knowledges to the detriment of local farming knowledges and has contributed to the economic and political marginalisation of the majority of farmers. Since discursive strategies are key to knowledge cultures, farmer narratives offer a rich insight into how, as Riley (2008: 1280) describes it, farmers ‘are able to structure discourse in a way that prioritises their individual and collective understandings and identities’. They reveal how knowledge cultures shape farmer identities and influence their farming practices. This chapter

in Spacing Ireland
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Bristol (map from USGS with markings by Elder). As a fellow denizen of the hinterlands, though living far from Ireland, I feel personally grateful for Robinson’s example of dogged and eccentric excellence at this ancient edge. By focusing on what the American poet and environmental activist Gary Snyder would call the lineaments of the land, rather than on political boundaries, Robinson invites his readers to lay their maps edge to edge with his, contributing to a collective effort of re-mapping and re-storying our homes on earth.The best way I can find to express my

in Unfolding Irish landscapes

believed that ‘we cannot separate ourselves from nature, and . . . small, self-governing communities are the most appropriate form of political organisation’, he simultaneously had few environmental qualms about using computers, because ‘it’s an essential part of my work’. Interviewees’ views of technology were heavily influenced by the control they were able to exert upon it. In this they assert that technology is not neutral, being to some extent infused with the objectives of those who design and produce it; and it becomes more acceptable if they have The tensions of

in Cyberprotest

also seek to use CMC as a route by which to avoid some of these threats (Castells 1997a). CMC is a medium through which environmentalists could assert their politics, but it is also a contested terrain (Breslow 1997). As companies stake their claim to cyberspace, they are able to assert influence over its regulation and the practice of ISPs and to use CMC as a tool through which to disseminate their corporate message. The use of surveillance and repression affects the tactics used by environmentalists, and the forms of surveillance and counter-strategy determine in

in Cyberprotest