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Emergence of the Corrib gas conflict

1 Politics and pipelines: emergence of the Corrib gas conflict It’s been a horribly difficult, desperate … damaging sort of project for the whole community up there. For people from both sides and there’s all sorts of perspectives up there, all sorts of different views. (Thomas,1 former Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources) Ah sure Corrib is a disaster … for everybody … the people involved on all sides. It’s no good for anybody the way it’s been dealt with badly. (Andrew, supports the Corrib gas project) The one thing on which supporters

in Gas, oil and the Irish state
The case of mitochondrial transfer

5 Freedom, law, politics, genes: the case of mitochondrial transfer Iain Brassington In early 2015, the UK became the first country to make explicit legal provision for the use of mitochondrial transfer techniques leading to a live human birth. Mitochondrial transfer offers a means to prevent mitochondrial illnesses being passed from a mother to her children, as they would be inevitably without the process. Two methods are possible: maternal spindle transfer, and pronuclear transfer. In both, nuclear material is removed from a cell that has faulty mitochondria

in The freedom of scientific research
Leeds Jewish tailors and Leeds Jewish tailoring trade unions, 1876–1915

dwindled to zero. There had been no victors among the men, only among the masters. Attempts were made by Jewish socialist tailors to reconstitute a Jewish tailors’ union which was open to all tailoring workers in the manner of ‘new unionism’ which was emerging in London. 38 Though the new union was open to all workers, the machiners, considering themselves of a higher level skill, retained their independence. It was not only the skill divide which separated the Jewish workforce, there was also a dichotomy between religiosity and new political

in Leeds and its Jewish Community

2 Sport, development and the political-economic context of Zambia This chapter examines how the wider political and economic context in Zambia has been influential in shaping the historical governance of sport and the expansion of the SfD ‘movement’ in the country. As the previous chapter has shown, within the academic literature most attention has been paid to the global expansion of SfD; a further, smaller body of

in Localizing global sport for development

Contrary to international law, international political theory and political philosophy paid scant attention to the ethics of intervention in the long nineteenth century. 1 As for humanitarian intervention per se, there is nothing, apart from cursory remarks by John Stuart Mill and Giuseppe Mazzini. On the wider question of intervention and non-intervention we will refer to their views and to those of Kant, Hegel and Cobden. Based on today’s distinction

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century

Global instruments on HR 5 The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights I The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR)1 was adopted by the UN General Assembly and entered into force on 23 March 1976.2 The Covenant has been ratified by 148 States,3 including many with significant indigenous populations. On the other hand, the non-parties also include many States with indigenous populations, including Bangladesh, Indonesia,4 Malaysia, Myanmar, Pakistan and Papua New Guinea. The Covenant is a complex statement of rights incorporating

in Indigenous peoples and human rights

This article will describe the contemporary scientific techniques used to excavate and identify the dead bodies of disappeared detainees from the Uruguayan dictatorship. It will highlight the developments that have led to increased success by forensic anthropologists and archaeologists in uncovering human remains, as well as their effects, both social and political, on promoting the right to the truth and mechanisms of transitional justice.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal

Truth commissions are widely recognised tools used in negotiation following political repression. Their work may be underpinned by formal scientific investigation of human remains. This paper presents an analysis of the role of forensic investigations in the transition to democracy following the Brazilian military governments of 1964–85. It considers practices during the dictatorship and in the period following, making reference to analyses of truth commission work in jurisdictions other than Brazil, including those in which the investigation of clandestine burials has taken place. Attempts to conceal the fate of victims during the dictatorship, and the attempts of democratic governments to investigate them are described. Despite various initiatives since the end of the military government, many victims remain unidentified. In Brazil, as elsewhere, forensic investigations are susceptible to political and social influences, leading to a situation in which relatives struggle to obtain meaningful restitution and have little trust in the transitional justice process.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Overriding politics and injustices

In October 2011, twenty skulls of the Herero and Nama people were repatriated from Germany to Namibia. So far, fifty-five skulls and two human skeletons have been repatriated to Namibia and preparations for the return of more skulls from Germany were at an advanced stage at the time of writing this article. Nonetheless, the skulls and skeletons that were returned from Germany in the past have been disappointingly laden with complexities and politics, to such an extent that they have not yet been handed over to their respective communities for mourning and burials. In this context, this article seeks to investigate the practice of ‘anonymising’ the presence of human remains in society by exploring the art and politics of the Namibian state’s memory production and sanctioning in enforcing restrictions on the affected communities not to perform, as they wish, their cultural and ritual practices for the remains of their ancestors.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal

This essay analyses the literature on the foibe to illustrate a political use of human remains. The foibe are the deep karstic pits in Istria and around Trieste where Yugoslavian Communist troops disposed of Italians they executed en masse during World War II. By comparing contemporary literature on the foibe to a selection of archival reports of foibe exhumation processes it will be argued that the foibe literature popular in Italy today serves a political rather than informational purpose. Counterpublic theory will be applied to examine how the recent increase in popular foibe literature brought the identity of the esuli, one of Italy‘s subaltern counterpublics, to the national stage. The paper argues that by employing the narrative structure of the Holocaust, contemporary literature on the foibe attempts to recast Italy as a counterpublic in the wider European public sphere, presenting Italy as an unrecognised victim in World War II.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal