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Lissette Lopez Szwydky

less known outside of specialised circles. The most influential study to date is Steven Forry’s ground-breaking book, Hideous Progenies: Dramatizations of Frankenstein from Mary Shelley to the Present (1990), which includes a comprehensive list of plays appearing between 1823 and 1986 and production details and commentary for many of those plays. Audrey A. Fisch’s Frankenstein: Icon of Modern Culture (2009) builds on Forry’s formative work, providing extensive summary and analysis of the nineteenth-century plays, as well as Victorian political cartoons (also

in Adapting Frankenstein
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Maria Holmgren Troy, Johan Höglund, Yvonne Leffler and Sofia Wijkmark

. To understand the emergence and proliferation of Nordic Gothic, this shifting geographical, political and linguistic context must be taken into consideration. The many and shifting political connections between the nations, and especially Denmark's strong ties to Germany, meant that European literature was often read in either German or French in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. The language situation within Scandinavia also facilitated dissemination of Nordic literature between the Nordic nations. Gothic in Swedish was easily accessible in parts of

in Nordic Gothic
Brutishness, discrimination and the lower-class wolf-man from The Wolf Man to True Blood
Victoria Amador

notes that Hobbes's discussion of melancholy and animality argues that individuals driven by concerns about the English Civil War demonstrated ‘wolfish humours’ which might be assuaged by ‘building a frontier between animal and human, casting the former as non-political and the latter as political’. 6 The non-political is, in its animal body, an undesirable, unwashed, incapable lower class; the human who controls the political is its social and intellectual superior. This elitist philosophy certainly underscores

in In the company of wolves
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The Frankenstein Complex: when the text is more than a text
Dennis R. Cutchins and Dennis R. Perry

past, have addressed important issues and cultural and historical themes such as sexual politics (Picart), race (Young), and literary politics (Baldick). But mythic and topical approaches, as helpful as they have been to Frankenstein studies, usually limit possible meanings by defining carefully circumscribed parameters of text (typically having a clear relationship to Shelley’s novel), genre (primarily literature to film), and criticism (often cultural criticism’s focus on race, gender, and class). But these approaches may not be comprehensive enough to account for

in Adapting Frankenstein
Johan Höglund

agrees with Brodén's aforementioned reading of Nordic Noir when he argues that while the shows he studies provide a form of closure through the disentangling of the crime, ‘the moral, political and social problems that produced’ the crime remain unresolved. 17 As a number of the chapters that make up this book demonstrate, Nordic Gothic is similarly complex and addresses a comparable moral, political and social dynamic. Through the Woods and Year Walk both contain extensive documentation that reveals a confrontation

in Nordic Gothic
Forbidden Planet, Frankenstein, and the atomic age
Dennis R. Perry

Franklin D. Roosevelt that building the atomic bomb was possible, later condemned the use of the bomb against Japan, and was sympathetic toward the Atomic Scientists movement (Clark 752). Having helped determine the outcome of World War II, the scientists involved in the movement had become important players on the world stage and changed the course of international politics. At the same time, more practical military and government officials pushed back against the idea that civilian scientists should regulate nuclear research. They recognised that less reasonable

in Adapting Frankenstein
Véronique Bragard and Catherine Thewissen

through the use of circumlocutions, or anticipatory ‘mini-episodes’ that are not found in Shelley’s text. These give substance and context to the politics and belief system of the nineteenth century. In one episode, as the reader gets to know the young Victor, Frankenstein’s mother discusses the secrets of creation with the local priest, thereby emphasising the religious system in place in the nineteenth century. This episode, which is not in Shelley’s novel, makes Victor’s challenging act of creation all the more transgressive. Another mini-episode features a young

in Adapting Frankenstein
Frankenstein meets H.P. Lovecraft’s ‘Herbert West – Reanimator’
Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock

question the ethical and political underpinnings of contemporary new materialist assertions. Not only do such narratives ask what happens when the body – both living and dead – is considered just another thing in the democracy of objects, but they also point out that to speak of a democracy of objects in which ‘everything exists equally’ (Bogost 6) belies the fact that we have yet to achieve even a democracy of human bodies. Stories of reanimated corpses, by raising questions concerning the differences between a person and a thing and different types of bodies, thus make

in Adapting Frankenstein
Nordic Gothic and transcultural adaptation
Maria Holmgren Troy

particular medium or genre… [T]heir aim might well be to economically and artistically supplant the prior works. They are just as likely to want to contest the aesthetic or political values of the adapted text as to pay homage’. 6 From Stephen King's and Matt Reeves’ perspectives, the American adaptations are at least partly meant to pay homage to the Nordic Gothic precursors, which is visible in quite a few direct audio-visual ‘quotations’ of the Nordic versions in the American productions. Beyond King's and Reeves

in Nordic Gothic
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Scientific experimentation in George MacDonald’s ‘The History of Photogen and Nycteris’
Rebecca Langworthy

: ‘Indeed, the radicalism of this acknowledgement had socio-political implications in 1870s England because it challenged the ideology of the privileged sex.’  26 Nycteris's ignorance of her gender displays how MacDonald's use of Rousseauvian child-rearing is limited to a formula for prepubescent education, without imposing gender roles on the child. Fear and weakness are not just associated with the feminine but become the definition of it. Nycteris places herself in the male role as the role most suited to her self

in In the company of wolves