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An introduction

the most revered acts in the history of popular music, among them Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and the Rolling Stones. Sharing wall space with these rock luminaries is, ironically, another band who once promised to be their pallbearers.1 London punks The Clash played the Ulster Hall on two separate occasions. The permanent exhibition that graces the foyer of the venue does not, however, centre on this brace of gigs that actually took place but rather, curiously, on one that never quite came to pass. On 20 October 1977 The Clash were scheduled to open their ‘Sort it Out

in Working for the clampdown
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Writing from the dark underground, 1976–92

the fact that many zines only ran to a few issues, they provide a clear insight into the transition from punk to post-punk and goth, as well as a useful corrective to the focus on the London scene which often characterises academic studies of goth. This chapter will explore the emergence of goth zine culture through three different zines: Panache, Whippings and Apologies and Propaganda. These zines have been strategically chosen as they represent iterations of early postpunk, goth as it emerged in the 1980s and, finally, the mainstreaming of the Goth zines -111

in Ripped, torn and cut

)zines rather than conference packs to match form with content in the history of subcultures.5 The Edmonton Zine fair, for example, launched a collaborative history zine, The History of Punk.6 Zines were utilised at various points during the fortieth anniversary of punk. The British Library used its zine collection to collate a narrative from the Sex Pistols’ breakthrough to the wider national punk story, whereas Matthew Worley’s community project -40- Going underground focused on the local experience of Norwich’s punk scene. Worley combined a street exhibition with a zine

in Ripped, torn and cut
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Scoring Statham

’s for Crank: High Voltage are major factors in the characterisation of Chev and the Statham comic/action star persona. Similarly, the pre-recorded tracks in both films are a mixture of styles and are used specifically to reinforce the frantic pace of the editing, the plot and the movement and psychology of Chev. The range of styles – punk rock, speed metal, rock, ‘urban

in Crank it up
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Nodes, ties and worlds

’). Figure 5.1 gives an example from my earlier work (Crossley 2015a). It visualises the network of key artists and support personnel in the Liverpool post-punk music world of the late 1970s, as derived from analysis of archives and secondary sources. Nodes are linked where I was able to identify evidence of musical collaboration between them between 1975 and 1980. Note that this is a snapshot of a dynamic relational structure which was always in-process. In most networks, nodes come and go over time and the ties between them form, break and change. We must always be

in Connecting sounds
Publics, protest and the avant-garde

the status quo and a transgression which illustrates the possibility of resistance in the wider world. In a slightly different vein, and drawing upon Adorno’s colleague, Benjamin (1968), Laing (1978) argues that innovations in form in early UK punk music generated ‘shock effects’ which unsettled audiences, engendering a more critical attitude. Moreover, Hebdige’s (1988) analysis of sub-cultural style in some ways echoes Adorno, pointing to the way in which sub-cultural styles challenge convention and, in the case of punk in particular, denaturalise social order. It

in Connecting sounds
The Clash, left melancholia and the politics of redemption

the band were quick to point out the disparity between the ‘everyman’ persona constructed by Joe Strummer and his real background as the public schoolboy John Mellor.9 In their memoir of the punk era, Julie Burchill and Tony Parsons, for instance, suggest that the distinctive, drawling, adenoidal speaking voice of The Clash front man was one that had required ‘de-elocution’ lessons.10 This vein of inverted snobbery was exemplified in reviews of the 1980 hit single ‘Bankrobber’. Journalists were wont to point out that the opening line of the track – ‘My daddy was a

in Working for the clampdown

visually as banal as their songs were prosaic. In 1975, Queen’s promo for Bohemian Rhapsody was an important element in the massive success of the single. Interestingly, the success of the video arguably set the group on a course away from being a progressive rock band to being a far more commerciallyoriented pop band in the next decade. Progressive rock self-indulgence was shunted aside by the crudity, directness and lack of pretension in the wave of punk rock that overtook Britain in the late 1970s and found some outlet on television. After the break-up of the Sex

in Experimental British television
Riot grrrl and body politics from the early 1990s

subcultural -298- Global communications punk/post-punk genealogies. Kate Eichhorn’s reappraisal has been crucial in moving beyond the idea that riot grrrl was simply an oppositional or reactionary statement to parental cultures of second-wave feminism and the male-dominated punk scene.11 Such a model, she argues, obscures its wider intellectual and aesthetic heritage as a ‘queer feminist hybrid of punk, continental philosophy, feminism, and avant-garde literary and art traditions’.12 Michelle Kempson has similarly demonstrated zine creators’ uneasiness with locating

in Ripped, torn and cut
Englishness, pop and The Smiths

London and its ‘English-garden-psychedelia’. In his songs, Davies reflected on the wider issues of Englishness, creating tools for future songwriters to express their ideas about England. Among the objectives of punk rock was to avoid the celebration of Englishness in a major way. Punk reacted aggressively against the privileged positions and institutions of ‘old England’ as the 1960s counter-culture had done before it, and rejected the nostalgia often prevalent in pop-Englishness. However, it also celebrated a problematic notion of Englishness in the form of frivolous

in Why pamper life's complexities?