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The Clash, Gary Foley, punk politics and Indigenous Australian activism
Alessandro Moliterno

194 THE CLASH AROUND THE WORLD 10 The one struggle: The Clash, Gary Foley, punk politics and Indigenous Australian activism Alessandro Moliterno On the evening of 23 February 1982, The Clash appeared on stage at Melbourne’s Festival Hall. Towards the end of their set, the band launched into one of their well-known reggae covers, ‘Armagideon Time’. At this point, they were joined on stage by the prominent Indigenous Australian activist Gary Foley. The music receded into an instrumental soundscape, as Foley took to the microphone and, with clarity and

in Working for the clampdown
Jason Toynbee

power on a platform of trade union repression and economic ‘reform’ in the interest of capitalism. The Clash played out their last years as efforts to push back Thatcherism climaxed (with the 1984 miners’ strike) and then subsided. By the time the final version of the band broke up in late 1985, neoliberalism was firmly ensconced in the UK. I think I’ve always been aware of this convergence between hard politics (what Francis Mulhern calls ‘politics proper’)2 and the path of The Clash, the most overtly political of the major punk rock bands. In the late 1970s and

in Working for the clampdown
Post-subcultural pop
Steve Redhead

political party, or philosophy, is not necessarily implied by such economic activity. Moreover, pop has always, in any case, been a cultural form which lent itself more to an exploration of a specifically sexual politics; it is in its relations to sexuality and gender that the politically deviant character of pop has been most pronounced since the 1940s. Further, to label this particular formation Political Pop is not to deny the politicisation of pop (post-​punk, in particular, is still seen as a golden age for political pop) in earlier eras, or to suggest an improvement

in The end-of-the-century party
The Clash in New York, in myth and reality
Harry Browne

to the identity of punk and of The Clash in particular? American dreams The story of the Americanising of The Clash has been told before, of course. There is an English punk version of the story that finds it quite reprehensible, whereby The Clash signing to CBS is a greater transgression of the punk ethos than the Sex Pistols on EMI, because the former involved national as well as cultural treachery. For the most part, though, the band’s expansionary westward development up to and including London Calling meets with approval from British writers and critics, at

in Working for the clampdown
An introduction
Colin Coulter

the most revered acts in the history of popular music, among them Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and the Rolling Stones. Sharing wall space with these rock luminaries is, ironically, another band who once promised to be their pallbearers.1 London punks The Clash played the Ulster Hall on two separate occasions. The permanent exhibition that graces the foyer of the venue does not, however, centre on this brace of gigs that actually took place but rather, curiously, on one that never quite came to pass. On 20 October 1977 The Clash were scheduled to open their ‘Sort it Out

in Working for the clampdown
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Writing from the dark underground, 1976–92
Claire Nally

the fact that many zines only ran to a few issues, they provide a clear insight into the transition from punk to post-punk and goth, as well as a useful corrective to the focus on the London scene which often characterises academic studies of goth. This chapter will explore the emergence of goth zine culture through three different zines: Panache, Whippings and Apologies and Propaganda. These zines have been strategically chosen as they represent iterations of early postpunk, goth as it emerged in the 1980s and, finally, the mainstreaming of the Goth zines -111

in Ripped, torn and cut
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The cultural politics of pop
Steve Redhead

specific taxonomies such as rock and roll, psychedelia, thrash, noise, garage, punk, go-​go, Hi-​Nrg, funk and dub which are readily available as a resource for documentary film-​ makers, record collectors, disc jockeys or musicians and producers armed with the latest sampling technology or just a sharp line in pastiche. The musical styles embodied in these rock and pop discourses can be revived, reworked, quoted, parodied, and plundered almost at will. On the other hand, popular music, in all its myriad forms, is more pervasive than ever in our supposedly postmodern

in The end-of-the-century party
Lucy Robinson

)zines rather than conference packs to match form with content in the history of subcultures.5 The Edmonton Zine fair, for example, launched a collaborative history zine, The History of Punk.6 Zines were utilised at various points during the fortieth anniversary of punk. The British Library used its zine collection to collate a narrative from the Sex Pistols’ breakthrough to the wider national punk story, whereas Matthew Worley’s community project -40- Going underground focused on the local experience of Norwich’s punk scene. Worley combined a street exhibition with a zine

in Ripped, torn and cut
Post-pop politics
Steve Redhead

 59 3 Soundtracks from the global hypermarket: post-​pop politics In the first two Chapters we have examined the case for subcultural theorists’ explanations of post-​ punk pop music culture. Subcultural theory has been found wanting in such accounts; it is more than likely that it was similarly inadequate in its analysis of pre-​punk subcultures, too. Moreover, the notion of Style Culture, which dominated subcultural politics of pop in the early part of the decade, was seriously misleading. Where it retained lasting value –​ for instance in its links with the

in The end-of-the-century party
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Scoring Statham
Shelley O’Brien

’s for Crank: High Voltage are major factors in the characterisation of Chev and the Statham comic/action star persona. Similarly, the pre-recorded tracks in both films are a mixture of styles and are used specifically to reinforce the frantic pace of the editing, the plot and the movement and psychology of Chev. The range of styles – punk rock, speed metal, rock, ‘urban

in Crank it up