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Julius Caesar before the Second World War
Andrew James Hartley

Marullus’s entrance (here made by Trebonius and Metellus). 19 The scene set the tone for a production which was to be both picturesque and realistic, at least in scope. The large-scale, lavish sets designed by the Academic painter Lawrence Alma-Tadema were meticulously archaeological, to such an extent that when some were criticised as being of a slightly later period, the theatre issued a formal communiqué apologising for the

in Julius Caesar
Tamsin Badcoe

uncertain character’ of colonial society ‘means that the colonizers’ social order is in constant jeopardy’. 23 Indeed, descriptions of the country’s perceived aberrance are startlingly formulaic: the alleged profundity of bogs and woodland collude to produce descriptions of a waterlogged landscape that exists as a kind of indeterminate world, resistant to precise physical definition, and which permeates the otherwise wholesome body of the planter. 24 Richard Stanihurst, for example, observes that the soil of Ireland ‘is low and waterish, including diverse little Ilands

in Edmund Spenser and the romance of space
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Kathleen Miller

‘medieval fabric’ of the city into the expansive metropolis of the eighteenth century.3 Further clarifying our understanding of Ireland’s landscape in the past is work by the Irish Post-Medieval Archaeology Group, which shares essential information on archaeological excavations in Ireland and literature relating to post-medieval archaeology, also publishing volumes that correspond with the Group’s conference proceedings.4 Never before have scholars had such a lively and complete impression of how early modern Ireland may have looked. Cultural and literary historians are

in Dublin
The scholarly achievements of Sir James Ware
Mark Empey

examine how he compiled such an impressive collection of manuscripts. It will expose the existence of a wide scholarly network, thereby demonstrating the extent of social and cultural interaction between ethnic and religious communities. Researching Dublin’s history It is no accident that the authors of two notable histories of Dublin – one in manuscript form, the other published – were related to Ware, the second of which was posthumously published as The history and antiquities of the city of Dublin from the earliest accounts (1766). Written by Walter Harris, who was

in Dublin
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Gaelic poetry and English books
Mícheál MacCraith

: Literature in Irish, 1560–1690’, in Margaret Kelleher and Philip O’Leary (eds), The Cambridge history of Irish literature (Cambridge, 2006), vol. i, pp. 191–231.   2 Emmet O’ Byrne, ‘The Tudor state and the Irish of East Leinster’, in Michael Potterton and Thomas Herron (eds), Dublin and the Pale in the Renaissance, c.1540–1660 (Dublin, 2011), pp. 68–92.   3 James Lyttleton, ‘Gaelic classicism in the Irish midland plantations: An archaeological reflection’, in Thomas Herron and Michael Potterton (eds), Ireland in the Renaissance, c.1540–1660 (Dublin, 2007), pp. 231

in Dublin
David Heffernan

breviat of the getting of Ireland, and of the decaie of the same’, c.1535, printed in Walter Harris (ed.), Hibernica, 2 vols (Dublin, 1747), vol. i, pp. 79–103; Thomas Luttrell, ‘Luttrell to Sentleger & c.’, 1537, SP Henry VIII, ii, 184; David Sutton, ‘Presentment by David Sutton to the King’s High Commissioners’, 1537, TNA: PRO, SP 60/5/13, in H. J. Hore and J. Graves (eds), The social state of the southern and eastern counties of Ireland in the sixteenth century (Dublin, 1870), pp. 160–6. GRIBBEN 9781526113245 PRINT.indd 79 20/04/2017 15:33 80 David Heffernan

in Dublin
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Sarah Annes Brown

’s richness and complexity. It is hardly surprising, given the many perceived links between texts and buildings, that we often find archaeological metaphors within literary criticism, whether we are searching beneath the surface of a text to find its concealed sources or excavating it to discover buried meanings. 26 Frederic Jameson observes that we apprehend texts ‘through

in A familiar compound ghost
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Dympna Callaghan

legislation that had sought to limit their direct access to the scripture (Molekamp, 2013 : 2), many women rifled the Bible to defend themselves from misogynist onslaught and to reinterpret Scripture to their own advantage. Women’s interventions now helped to shape the debate about the spiritual, social and political status of women, from Lanyer’s Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum in

in Biblical women in early modern literary culture 1550–1700
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Orpheus and Pygmalion
Sarah Annes Brown

authors. The unearthing of the statue within James’s story parallels his own ‘unearthing’ of Mérimée. And if we, in our turn, unearth the link we will appreciate the way the occluded queer subtexts of the tales reinforce and illuminate one another. Once the Count beholds the Juno, discovered during the course of an archaeological excavation of his grounds, his relationship with Martha goes sour. The

in A familiar compound ghost