Search results

The Catholic Church in Salford and refugees
Bill Williams

Catholic Women’s League contain no evidence of an interest in the Jews. SDA Marshall Papers 204/134–135, typescript headed ‘Catholic Refugees’ n.d. (but shortly after the Evian Conference of July 1938). Ibid. Of the 1,000 children in the Manchester region by 1943 (600 of them in the city and its immediate vicinity), between 20 and 25% were said to have been Christian. The Harvest, Vol. L11, No. 1, February 1939. SDA Henshaw Papers 203/146. In the absence of any evidence of an alternative, I have assumed this to have been the body referred to occasionally in the records

in ‘Jews and other foreigners’
Abstract only
Helen Boak

over a number of years, principally from the Federal Archives in Koblenz and Berlin, the Zentrales Staatsarchiv Potsdam in the former German Democratic Republic, the Helene-Lange-Archiv, now housed in the Landesarchiv Berlin, the archives of the German Protestant Women’s League, now housed in the Archiv der Deutschen Frauenbewegung in Kassel, the archives of the German Catholic Women’s League in Cologne and a variety of smaller archives. 35 Historians of modern Germany are fortunate to have a range of official statistical publications at their disposal, and during

in Women in the Weimar Republic
Helen Boak

cities across Germany devoted themselves to caring for troops en route to the front or in hospital, other women’s groups, including those affiliated to the BdF, women from the Catholic Women’s League (Katholischer Frauenbund Deutschlands, KFB) and social democratic women came together under the banner of the National Women’s Service (Nationaler Frauendienst, NFD) to become a major provider of social welfare. 76 The NFD was the brainchild of Dr Gertrud Bäumer, the leader of the BdF, which at the outbreak of the war claimed to have some half a million members. Bäumer

in Women in the Weimar Republic
Beyond ‘ghettos’ and ‘golden ages’
Alana Harris

subsidiarity and suspicion of the welfare state.38 The activities of a number of highly distinctive Catholic social organisations – seen to be a tentative flowering of ‘Catholic Action’ in an English context – reinforce this picture of a self-contained, distinctive Catholic milieu.39 Micro-histories of the Catholic Federation,40 Catholic Social Guild,41 Catholic Evidence Guild,42 Catholic Women’s League43 and the Young Christian Workers,44 are written through an often celebratory, and implicitly comparative, lens. Such 032-056 FaithFamily Ch 2.indd 36 24/04/2013 15

in Faith in the family
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

then the enactment of the 1829 Catholic Emancipation Act made conventual life, and in particular the growth of female active, simple-vowed congregations, a viable possibility in England.13 English women no longer had to travel to the continent to become nuns, and religious life was no longer the exclusive purview of the English Catholic elite. The development and dramatic growth of women’s simplevowed, active congregations expanded the boundaries of religious life by expanding the base of Catholic women who could become women religious. And this cohort of Catholic

in Contested identities
S. Karly Kehoe

empowered generations of Catholic women. However, the monopoly they held over teacher training ensured the delivery of a more uniform, more British teaching programme in Catholic schools. This congregation espoused a strong ultramontane and British identity; this was passed on to their students and so in many ways they were Anglicising Catholic culture in Scotland. This process continued with the establishment of Scotland’s first Catholic teacher training college at Dowanhill in Glasgow. The committee responsible for organising it included 134 Creating a Scottish Church

in Creating a Scottish Church
Abstract only
Women and poor law administration
Virginia Crossman

provinces, however, the social status, and more particularly the religion, of women candidates could prove an electoral liability. The Galway Pilot, for example, objected to the candidature of ‘two Protestant ladies’, in a city whose poor were ‘almost 99 per cent Catholic’. Since the women’s wards of the workhouse were in the charge of nuns, the Pilot argued, there was no need for ‘lady guardians’. According to a letter in the Galway Observer this was also the reason why no Catholic women had come forward as candidates.50 One of the results of the advancement of female

in Politics, pauperism and power in late nineteenth-century Ireland
An overview
Elaine Farrell

Catholic. Since the average Catholic population between 1861 and 1901 was 76.1 per cent, as recorded in the censuses of Ireland,56 Roman Catholics appear to have been somewhat overrepresented in the sample. In Imperial Germany too, Catholic women dominated infanticide and infant abandonment statistics, which could, as Richter argues, reflect ‘the 013-047 DiabolicalDeed Chapter1.indd 23 30/01/2013 12:02 24 a most diabolical deed influence of Catholicism or the relative impoverishment and distinctive occupational structure of the Catholic population’.57 The attitude

in ‘A most diabolical deed’
Carmen Mangion

Bavaria Leaders of Catholic women’s religious institutes managed the activities and internal affairs of their congregations and orders. Their governance structures had some parallels with the Holy See’s hierarchical structures, with its centralised authority. Religious institutes were political cultures with much of the major decision-making in the hands of a small group, an often elected (sometimes for life) female leader and her four or five assistants. As political cultures, they were shaped by social class hierarchies and the practice of religious obedience. 26

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

movements. Cardinal John Heenan, writing in 1965, was concerned about an emphasis on lay movements: ‘If the priesthood of the laity comes to be regarded as sufficient and our brightest boys no longer look to the priesthood we shall have entered a second dark age.’ 76 Quadragesima Anno , issued by Pope Pius XI in 1931, called for a reinvigoration of the lay apostolate. Lay movements such as Catholic Action, the Young Christian Worker movement and older organisations such as the St Vincent de Paul Society and Catholic Women’s League offered young women and men

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age