Gothic and the perverse father of queer enjoyment

. 14 Robert Miles, ‘Ann Radcliffe and Matthew Lewis’, in David Punter (ed.), A Companion to the Gothic (Oxford: Blackwell, 2001), pp. 41–57 at p. 52. 15 Matthew Gregory Lewis, The Monk: A Romance (1796), ed. Howard Anderson (Oxford: Oxford University Press

in Queering the Gothic
Gothic mansions, ghosts and particular friendships

of the Inquisition referred to in Gothic novels such as Matthew Lewis’s The Monk (1796). Nanda has a taste of this puritanical and sadistically oppressive culture on her first night at the Convent. On entering the dormitory, she finds that it lacks a looking-glass as such objects are condemned as promoting vanity. An older pupil who has been assigned the task of initiating her into the nightly

in Queering the Gothic
Anatomy and the birth of horror in The [First] Book of Urizen

immortal corpus of medical science, which resurrects the body by overwriting its true ruined condition. 23 In rejecting Eternity in favour of the text, Urizen is the Ur -anatomist who embraces the corpse over the living body because it cannot die. In an echo of the fates of the abusive authority figures that dominate the Gothic works of the 1790s, like Matthew Lewis's Ambrosio and Ann Radcliffe's Schedoni, the consequences of Urizen

in William Blake's Gothic imagination
Globes, englobing powers, and Blake's archaeologies of the present

paternal) face to face with each other. The same can be said of Queen Elizabeth I and Mary Queen of Scots in Sophia Lee's The Recess (1783–85); Vathek and Omar Ben Abdalaziz in William Beckford's Vathek: An Arabian Tale (1786); Montoni and St. Aubert in Ann Radcliffe's The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794); the Marquis and Carlos in Karl Grosse's Horrid Mysteries (1796); Ambrosio/Mathilda and Lorenzo/Raymond in Matthew Lewis's The Monk

in William Blake's Gothic imagination
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artist’s imagined sepulchre. A red-haired naked woman embraces an obelisk and figures in monkish crimson robes pursue various acts of depredation amongst the graves, including one man kneeling, whip in hand, beside a stone decorated with a vaginal mouth. One only has to remember Matthew Lewis’s graphic descriptions of sadism in Roman Catholic convents and the engravings of lurid blue books to realise

in Gothic effigy
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’ / ‘Fool Death, My Playmate’ (c. 1922) depicted nude female models juxtaposed with human skeletons in quasi-sexual positions. The editor Robert Denoël instructed Antonin Artaud to translate Matthew Lewis’s The Monk , which Artaud, in part, managed to accomplish. As part of this project Artaud produced a series of six highly stylised photographic tableaux vivants with himself as the Ambrosio and Cécile

in Gothic effigy
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Whether realised as a folly, a painted backdrop for Matthew Lewis’s Castle Spectre , a dark masquerade, an Alexander McQueen exhibition or a production by Scorpius Dance, Gothic is performative. Live, videoed and photographed performance art is currently a growth area of Gothic creative expression. Gabriela Fridriksdottir’s performances involve a cast of mutant characters with distorted faces kneaded

in Gothic effigy
The rise of Nordic Gothic

The emergence of Gothic is commonly understood to coincide with the publication of Horace Walpoles's The Castle of Otranto , subtitled A Gothic Story , in 1764. The new genre quickly gained momentum until, at the turn of the century, it had spread across Europe, into the United States and many European colonies. Many of these well-known English, German and French novels were available to Nordic readers and some of them were quickly translated into Swedish, Danish and Norwegian. As an example, Matthew Lewis's The Monk (1796) was translated and published in

in Nordic Gothic

reprints of the classic Gothic novels. In addition to this, as Francesca Saggini shows in The Gothic Novel and the Stage: Romantic Appropriations ( 2015 ), the theatre picked up the Gothic trend very quickly. Saggini claims that the Gothic movement is not simply from page-to-stage but also takes place in the opposite direction, so that Matthew Lewis in The Monk (1796) appropriated a ‘variety of contemporary spectacular forms and conventions taken from the fringe world of pantomime and visual shows’ when he wrote his novel. 1

in Nordic Gothic

Diarmaid MacCulloch, Tudor Church Militant (London: Penguin, 1999), pp. 107–9. 56 Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama the sceptical witchcraft writings of, for example, Reginald Scot. This attitude towards Catholic miracles has a protracted literary afterlife. Long after the Renaissance, Matthew Lewis’s lurid Gothic novel The Monk (1796) features a statue of St Clare in the vault of a convent, a statue which is believed by the nuns to have miraculous powers. Dashing, aristocratic Lorenzo, the Spanish but cryptoProtestant hero of the novel, reveals the

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681