3 The university campaign The question The issue of university education in Ireland was a constant source of grievance for the bishops. The university system in Ireland was ‘at the centre of a network of proselytism and indifferentism which the hierarchy had come to regard as the characteristic of the Protestant constitution in Ireland’.1 The Roman Catholic Church demanded the same rights and recognition which the state extended to Protestants in terms of statefunded, denominational university education. The demand for national justice, however, masked other

in Michael Logue and the Catholic Church in Ireland, 1879–1925
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condemnation of the British Government in 1920. The bishops accused republicans of attacking their country as if it were a foreign power. They declared that they had no legitimate authority for their campaign and, more significantly, branded the republican movement as being inherently opposed to Catholic doctrine. ‘In spite of their obvious sin and the fact of their unlawful rebellion’, they went on, ‘they still play the role of good Catholics and demand the Sacraments’. Consequently, the bishops moved to cut republicans off from the Church. All those who participated in the

in Michael Logue and the Catholic Church in Ireland, 1879–1925
The polity of the British episcopal churches, 1603–62

‘From the Apostles’ time’ Chapter 2 ‘From the Apostles’ time’: the polity of the British episcopal churches, 1603–62 Benjamin M. Guyer A midst controversy, armed conflict and bloodshed, in the seventeenth century episcopacy became a defining feature of the Church of England and its Irish and Scottish counterparts. This chapter makes an extended methodological argument about the importance of attending to the longue durée by setting debates about episcopal polity in two broad contexts.1 First, and more broadly, is the confessional framework provided by

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
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Epilogue By a Chapel as I came is a little-known fifteenth-century carol in which the narrator happens upon Christ, who is on his way to church: And By a chapell as y Came, Mett y wythe Ihū to chyrcheward gone Petur and Pawle, thomas & Ihon, And hys desyplys Euery-chone. Mery hyt ys in may mornyng, Mery ways ffor to gonne.1 The narrator falls into step with Christ and his disciples as they make their way ‘chyrcheward’, and what they discover inside the chapel is truly marvellous: the saints are performing the liturgy. Sente Thomas þe Bellys gane ryng, And

in The church as sacred space in Middle English literature and culture
Politics and theology, 1709–19

9780719078729_4_004.qxd 11/26/08 10:34 Page 109 Chapter 4 The spectre of High Church: politics and theology, 1709–19 Q ueen Anne’s husband, Prince George of Denmark, died in October 1708. For the queen, whose health had never been robust, the added strain left her susceptible to manoeuvring on the part of her ministers – Whigs temporarily regained the royal ear. Whig resurgence, however, was short-lived as the continuing expense of participating in the War of the Spanish Succession frustrated both Anne and tax-hating Tories such as Robert Harley. Tories

in Deism in Enlightenment England
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Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66

Introduction Chapter 1 Introduction: church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66 Elliot Vernon T he topic of church polity is one of the ‘Cinderella’ subjects of early modern religious history, late to the ball but entrancing none the less.1 The chapters presented in this volume argue that the topic of church polity was a crucial factor in the politics of the British Atlantic world during the mid-seventeenth century. By ‘church polity’ is meant the manner in which the church is structured and governed. It is related to the term

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
An exploration of church polity and the governance of the region’s churches

The New England way reconsidered Chapter 8 The New England way reconsidered: an exploration of church polity and the governance of the region’s churches Francis J. Bremer N ewly arrived in Boston after three decades as the spiritual leader of the New Haven church and colony, John Davenport welcomed an invitation from the deputies of the Massachusetts General Court to deliver the annual election-day sermon in May 1669. Mounting a defence of the congregational principles on which the region had been founded, he warned of changes that would lead to ‘an end of

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:39 Page 55 3 Migrant integration and the ‘network-making power’ of the Irish Catholic Church Breda Gray Introduction In this chapter I discuss the Irish Catholic Church as both a bureaucratic hierarchal institution and transnational network that promotes migrant integration and welfare via ‘network-making power’ (Castells, 2009, 2011). The Catholic Church has always channelled flows of religious values, information and people. However, my focus here is on the network-making power of the Irish Catholic Church in shaping the

in Migrations
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Pastoral care in the parish church

3 Sacred and profane: Pastoral care in the parish church The fourteenth-century conduct poem How the Goode Wife Taught Hyr Doughter begins by establishing the centrality of the church in the life of the medieval laywoman. Good conduct on the part of the daughter is founded upon supporting the parish church: spiritually, financially, and through good behaviour. Doughter, and thou wylle be a wyfe, Wysely to wyrche in all thi lyfe Serve God, and kepe thy chyrche, And myche the better thou shal wyrche. To go to chyrch, lette for no reyne, And that schall helpe thee

in The church as sacred space in Middle English literature and culture
Autobiography, suffering and professions of faith

Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic Chapter 12 The Restoration episcopate and the interregnum: autobiography, suffering and professions of faith Sarah Ward Clavier1 R estoration bishops came in all flavours: Laudians, Calvinists and those who have apparently left so little indication of their religious views that they still remain a mystery to posterity. They ranged from authoritarian micromanagers to those who seemed barely interested in the business of their individual dioceses. On the whole, however, it is difficult to imagine the events of

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66