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Conclusion Contemporary discussion on the future of citizenship and male leisure between 1850 and 1945 was a fluid discourse, filtered through wider anxieties that gripped society at the time. While popular leisure patterns were often seen as an obstacle to ‘good’ citizenship, appropriate ‘rational’ leisure was perceived as the antidote to urban degeneracy. The book’s focus on the Midlands has revealed that the citizenry were perceived as much as a problem in ‘boom towns’ as in poverty-stricken areas that have traditionally been associated with schemes of cultural

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945

5 Making ‘race’ an issue in the 2004 Irish Citizenship Referendum Steve Garner Introduction On 11 June 2004, the Irish electorate voted on the ‘Twenty-seventh Amendment of the Constitution Bill’ or, as it is more generally known, the Citizenship Referendum (hereafter the Referendum). On that day a large majority of those who voted – almost 80 per cent – sanctioned a withdrawal of the automatic constitutional right to citizenship for all children born in the Republic of Ireland. The Citizenship Act (2005) introduced a distinction between children born in Ireland

in Defining events

the term ‘Third Way’ by several years. At the heart of New Labour’s Third Way is the claim that economic efficiency and social justice can be symbiotic. I argue that the articulation of a particular concept of citizenship is a crucial element of the framework that New Labour believes is necessary in order to achieve this. This argument is supported by evidence drawn from a discursive

in The Third Way and beyond
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Introduction During the 1930s a series of conferences were held in Britain to discuss the ‘problem’ of leisure and citizenship. ‘Tell me how a man spends his leisure time and I will tell you what sort of a man he is’ was the common cry from the platform.1 Such a statement would not have been out of place in the mid-nineteenth century as leisure and citizenship had long been elevated to a position of national importance. To be precise, it was male leisure which generated the most concern. The 1867 Reform Act, which allowed a proportion of skilled working men to

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945

Allwood 05 24/2/10 5 10:30 Page 129 Refugees, gender and citizenship in Britain and France This chapter explores the question of citizenship-building processes in relation to women asylum seekers and refugees and their civic participation not only in discrete refugee women’s community associations or organisations (RCOs) but also in (longer established) migrant women’s community associations.1 Its aim is fourfold: first, it discusses the relationship between the question of citizenship, refugee women and their associations; second, it presents an overview

in Refugee women in Britain and France
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10 Conclusion We began this research, as we explained in the Introduction, because we wanted to explore a question that we felt had been neglected. When and how does popular culture contribute to citizenship? As we noted, much has been written and said about the part played by news and current affairs media in political engagement, but much less about the contribution made by entertainment. It is true that research has moved beyond the stand-off between those who see all forms of popular entertainment as harmful to citizenship, and those who see it as an

in From entertainment to citizenship
C. E. Beneš

Part eight offers three chapters of advice for good citizenship: citizens ought to be thoughtful and mature in making decisions; they ought to be virtuous rather than slaves to vice; and they ought to have the greatest zeal for the commonwealth.

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa

5 Globalisation, the breaking and re-making of social democratic citizenship Hans Schattle Introduction: the erosion of social democratic citizenship Social democratic citizenship can be regarded as the fulfilment of not only civil and political rights but also social and economic rights – rights to education, health care, living wages, unemployment insurance and pensions – and it is all too obvious that these rights have eroded severely in recent decades across the ‘developed’ world. The gutting of trade unions, the reduction of full-time jobs paying decent

in Making social democrats
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politics is casually mocked or earnestly regarded, it is less commonly studied in detail. This book is dedicated to doing just this. From entertainment to citizenship looks at how ‘politics’, itself an ambiguous and multifaceted term, features in the content of popular culture – from soap operas to pop songs to video games. But it also reveals how the forms of popular culture are themselves understood and used as forms of political engagement. It is one thing for academic analysts to point to the ‘messages’ encoded in a cultural text; it is quite another to say that

in From entertainment to citizenship
The pleasure-seeking citizen

commercial leisure. The third section will explore how reactions to intemperance in the music hall and public house stimulated both cross-class collaborative and class-specific movements which placed temperance at the heart of their own particular narrative of citizenship. In addition, we shall explore the attempts by both class-collaborative and class-specific movements to forge narratives of ‘good’ citizenship by attacking mass commercial leisure and adopting the temperance cause. Finally football, one of the most potent forms of mass commercial leisure, provides a case

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945