Abstract only
Bernadette C. Hayes and Ian McAllister

While institutional design is viewed as the most effective means of resolving divisions in post-conflict societies, there has also been an emphasis on peace building at the grass-roots level. It is often argued that successful conflict resolution is as much about the reconstruction of communities and societies as it is about the design of political institutions and states

in Conflict to peace
Stephen Benedict Dyson

policy from June 2004 until mid-2006 from the standpoint of security and of politics, analyzing Bush and Rumsfeld’s conceptions of what was necessary and the conflict between these two visions. Bush and Rumsfeld’s worldviews led them to very different conclusions as to what was required, but their personal styles meant that they did not have a direct debate about these differences. The puzzling US

in Leaders in conflict
Peter Shirlow, Jonathan Tonge, James McAuley and Catherine McGlynn

have been reinforced, reinvented or even abandoned. More narrowly, it examines the extent to which former prisoners and the organisations representing them have questioned certain ideological assumptions, which seemingly underpinned their conduct and ‘justified’ their actions in the conflict and post-conflict phases. The narratives presented are structured around past events

in Abandoning historical conflict?
A contextual and thematic analysis
Kirk Simpson

Simpson 01 19/1/09 10:35 Page 8 1 The conflict in Northern Ireland A contextual and thematic analysis Introduction Searching for a ‘centre ground’ in Northern Irish politics has never been easy, least of all in terms of truth recovery and dealing with the past. The most problematic question often becomes: ‘Whose centre?’ Yet more often than not, this is a question posed by moral and cultural relativists, or political partisans who use tendentious rhetoric to argue that consensual agreement in which all past wrongdoing is acknowledged and documented is

in Truth recovery in Northern Ireland
Sue-Ann Harding

This book, motivated by both the events in Beslan and the ideas of narrative theory, asks to what extent a narrative theory combining sociological and narratological approaches lends itself to elaborating a model of analysis for the study of media reporting (and translation) on violent conflict in general and the Beslan hostage disaster in particular. Narrative theory was adopted not only as the

in Beslan
Bernadette C. Hayes and Ian McAllister

of southeast Europe and central Asia, as well as the Middle East and East Asia. For most of the twentieth century, the issue of jurisdictional incongruence was at the heart of the Northern Ireland conflict. Between 1969 and 1998, when the Belfast Agreement was signed, the conflict defied all efforts by the British and Irish governments to solve it. While the post-1998 period has also been one of

in Conflict to peace
Peter Shirlow, Jonathan Tonge, James McAuley and Catherine McGlynn

cultural wrapping ( Irish News , 31 March 2003). Writing in the Irish New s on the occasion of the donation of republican former prisoners’ books to the Linen Hall Library in Belfast, Patrick Murphy managed to touch in one paragraph on two assumptions about non-state combatants imprisoned during the Northern Ireland conflict. The Long Kesh library was

in Abandoning historical conflict?
Abstract only
Bernadette C. Hayes and Ian McAllister

effects of religion also made it an obvious choice for the new parties. In part, too, the nascent party system was shaped by the events that had occurred before partition, starting with conflict over the first Home Rule Bill in 1886 and continuing through to the third Home Rule Bill in 1912. In short, then, the political parties that emerged in the 1920s were essentially sectarian in their appeal, and elections acted simply

in Conflict to peace
The politics of peace
Jonathan Tonge

M1426 - COULTER TEXT.qxp:GRAHAM Q7 17/7/08 08:01 Page 49 3 From conflict to communal politics: the politics of peace Jonathan Tonge The end of armed conflict and arrival of devolved power sharing in Northern Ireland does not appear to have lessened the communal divisions that mark the political life of the region. The link between religious affiliation and political preference remains the strongest in Western Europe. The supporters of each of the principal parties continue to be drawn almost exclusively from rival ethno-religious blocs, a pattern unlikely to

in Northern Ireland after the troubles
Peter Dorey

been in favour of industrial relations legislation changed their minds. In most cases, this loss of support derived from growing Ministerial recognition of just how wide and deep the opposition was to In Place of Strife – and, again, particularly the penal clauses – both in the PLP and among the trade unions (these two sources of opposition are examined in chapters 5 and 6 respectively). The scale of the opposition to the proposed industrial 73 74 Comrades in conflict relations legislation was such that it was highly unlikely to secure sufficient support among

in Comrades in conflict