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The Belfast Agreement, ‘equivalence of rights’ and the North–South dimension
Colm O’Cinneide

Ethnic, religious, gender, socio-economic and other forms of inequalities persist on both sides of the border and particularly affect everyday life in how they manifest themselves in the employment relationship. Comprehensive anti-discrimination legislation exists in both parts of the island, which is founded upon European Union equality legislation and

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
Michael Banton

35 Chapter 1 Extending the rule of law Michael Banton Adoption of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD/​the Convention) was a significant forward step in the extension of the rule of law. That process had begun in classical antiquity with the recognition of ius gentium, the law of peoples, as a step above the laws of particular peoples. It also featured in the conception of natural law, according to which the State must respect a lawfulness that is not of its own creation. So the story of human rights law

in Fifty years of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination
Pastor Murillo
and
Esther Ojulari

150 Chapter 7 General Recommendation 34: a contribution to the visibility and inclusion of Afro-​descendants in Latin America Pastor Murillo and Esther Ojulari Introduction In a context of mestizo1 national identities and the ‘myth of racial democracy’,2 the issue of racial discrimination was largely denied in many Latin American countries for much of the twentieth century. Reflecting this, Afro-​descendants were an ‘invisible group’ within international law, with no specific norms or mechanisms responding to their particular rights claims until the twenty

in Fifty years of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination
Bryan Fanning

8 Multicultualism in Ireland Introduction This chapter examines efforts to contest racism and discrimination faced by minorities in Ireland as expressions of multiculturalism. These include those by the state to oppose racism and discrimination, those which have emerged ‘bottom up’ at the instigation of activists from minority communities, notably from Travellers, and responses by the state to these. Current state practices, legislation and voluntary initiatives are described as amounting to a ‘weak’ multiculturalism. This multiculturalism is characterised by a

in Racism and social change in the Republic of Ireland
Disaggregated data in the work of the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination
Joshua Clark

51 Chapter 2 Knowing and doing with numbers: disaggregated data in the work of the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination Joshua Clark The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD/​ the Committee) has asked that States provide it with population statistics broken down by race, ethnicity or nationality for most of its history, but never with as much priority as in the last fifteen years. This chapter analyses CERD’s evolving approach to using these disaggregated data to monitor and promote implementation of the International

in Fifty years of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination
Neil McNaughton

Issues concerning women Racial issues and the multicultural society 106 8 ➤ The background to racial problems in the UK ➤ Descriptions of the main pieces of race legislation ➤ The features and importance of the Stephen Lawrence case ➤ The importance of the Macpherson and Ousley Reports ➤ The work of the Commission for Racial Equality ➤ The broad issues of racial discrimination ➤ Forms of non-legislative race relations initiatives ➤ The issue of multiracialism IMMIGRATION Although Britain has, throughout its history, assimilated large numbers of different

in Understanding British and European political issues
Tarlach McGonagle

246 Chapter 12 General Recommendation 35 on combating racist hate speech Tarlach McGonagle* Introduction The central concern of General Recommendation 35 (2013) of the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD/​ the Committee) is to figure out and set out how the ‘resources’ of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD/​the Convention) can be optimally ‘mobilised’ for the purpose of combating racist hate speech. The term ‘racist hate speech’ does not actually appear in the text of the

in Fifty years of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination
Using norms to promote progress on the Global Action Plan to End Statelessness
Melissa Schnyder

, it illustrates how CSOs are currently using normative innovation to advance a normative framework based on a combination of equality, inclusion, and anti-discrimination norms to generate more progress on Action 3 (remove gender discrimination from nationality laws), an area that has seen less success. Because norms play a role in both formal and informal

in Statelessness, governance, and the problem of citizenship
A blessing or a curse for the employment of female university graduates?
Fang Lee Cooke

Union (see Grimshaw and Rubery, 2015; Rubery, 2013). By contrast, while a significant level of gender equality in employment in China has been achieved during the state-planned economy period, measured by the extent of women’s participation in full-time employment and the relatively small gender pay gap (Gustafsson and Li, 2000; Nie et al., 2002), gender discrimination has increased substantially as a result of the deepening marketisation of the economy since the 1980s in China (Cooke, 2012). In particular, labour market discrimination against women of childbearing

in Making work more equal
Nadia Kiwan

6 The socio-economics of community Introduction This chapter focuses on three aspects of collective experience among young French-North Africans in Seine-Saint-Denis: the banlieue, the quartier (or cité) and racial discrimination. While the banlieue and the quartier are often considered as predominantly socio-economic categories, I argue that they can be seen as representing an interface between social and more cultural forms of identity. The interface between the socioeconomic and the cultural is also discussed in relation to the interviewees’ narratives of

in Identities, discourses and experiences