1 The invention of the self When truth embodied in a tale (Tennyson, In Memoriam, 36) There are moments when the pursuit of history can seem truly unnerving. Sometimes that past which was meant to ground our ideas and conceptions gives way and reveals something stranger, alien and uncanny. Although such episodes are rare events in most historians’ lives, they form a recurring motif in fantastic literature, where they are widely associated with the breakdown of identity and personality. Stories of historians driven to madness and despair when their narratives

in Resisting history

Chapter 5 . Genealogical history I n the age of Elizabeth I genealogy was not simply the province of antiquaries and heralds. It was broadly recognised that aristocrats and the gentry had a personal, legitimate interest in promoting and preserving their lineage, and this interest could significantly affect the political, financial and marital fortunes of a family. In 1570 a double marriage was proposed between Mary and Frances – daughters and co-heirs of Henry, lord Berkeley – and Sir Philip and Sir Robert Sidney – the nephews of the earls of Warwick and

in ‘No historie so meete’
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Francis Bacon’s History of the Reign of King Henry VII

T A C I T E A N H I S T O R Y 17 1 Tacitean history: Francis Bacon’s History of the Reign of King Henry VII On 30 April 1621, a ‘Confession and Humble Submission’ was read before the House of Lords. In this document, Sir Francis Bacon acknowledged that, as Lord High Chancellor, he had received bribes and was, therefore, ‘guilty of corruption’.1 The Lords responded with a harsh sentence: Bacon was given a fine of £40,000, imprisoned at the King’s pleasure, and barred from holding office or high employment in the state and from coming within twelve miles of

in Commerce, finance and statecraft

animated Eliot and her ecclesiastical colleagues.1 Some, including the Chartist ex-cobbler Thomas Cooper, believed that historical criticism would reveal the ‘legendary incrustations’ that had corrupted the true history of Christ.2 Like Strauss and Eliot, he saw the critical method as a means to strip away ‘the false, the idolatrous, and enslaving forms in which priestcraft clothes that glorious Galilean peasant’.3 Others went much further. Cooper’s erstwhile friend and colleague, the Chartist poet Gerald Massey, believed that Christ was no more than the sum of these

in Resisting history
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Chapter 6 . Didactic history O pening the preface to the Antiquities of Warwickshire Dugdale consciously placed his work within the didactic tradition of historical writing, by quoting from Raleigh’s History of the World: ‘It is History that hath given us Life in our Understanding since the World it self had Life and Beginning.’ He described his purpose to be ‘by setting before you the noble and eminent actions of your worthy ancestors, to incite the present and future ages to a virtuous imitation of them’. The work was a ‘Monumentall Pillar’, which like the

in ‘No historie so meete’
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Thomas Carte’s General History

134 COMMERCE, FINANCE AND STATECRAFT 7 Jacobite history: Thomas Carte’s General History A more far-reaching critique both of Rapin’s History and Whiggish ideas of credit was developed by the Oxford historian Thomas Carte in the 1740s and 1750s.1 Carte was a diligent and able scholar, and the author of a series of well-documented historical works including a three-volume History and Life of James Duke of Ormonde (1735–36) and the four-volume General History of England (1747–55).2 He was also a Non-Juror and an active Jacobite conspirator. In the 1720s he

in Commerce, finance and statecraft

This book provides an account of the University of Manchester's struggle to meet the government's demands for the rapid expansion of higher education in the 1950s and the 1960s. It looks at the University's ambitious building programme: the controversial attempts to reform its constitution and improve its communications amid demands for greater democracy in the workplace, the struggle to retain its old pre-eminence in a competitive world where new ‘green field’ universities were rivalling older civic institutions. The book tells the story, not just from the point of view of administrators and academics, but also from those of students and support staff (such as secretaries, technicians and engineers). It not only uses official records, but also student newspapers, political pamphlets and reminiscences collected through interviews.

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Thomas Salmon’s Modern History

T O R Y H I S T O R Y 117 6 Tory history: Thomas Salmon’s Modern History The popularity of Rapin’s Histoire ensured that it generated a large number of responses from other historians. Indeed, both Thomas Salmon’s Modern History (1724–38), the subject of this chapter, and Thomas Carte’s General History (1747–55), the subject of the next, provided direct attacks on Rapin’s account. However, whereas Rapin had shown little interest in contemporary debates about public credit, Salmon’s and Carte’s analyses were structured around criticisms of the system of

in Commerce, finance and statecraft
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The evolution of a subject

Several of those who have set out to explain the emergence of Atlantic History as a distinct subject of enquiry have begun by seeking to establish when the concept of an Atlantic World first came into vogue. Those who have done so have found that the concept of an Atlantic Community, if not of an Atlantic World, was first popularized in the aftermath of the Second World War by scholars who considered that the liberal-democratic values that had been gradually enshrined into law by governments on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean from the late

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered
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Paul de Rapin de Thoyras’s Histoire

102 COMMERCE, FINANCE AND STATECRAFT 5 Whig history: Paul de Rapin de Thoyras’s Histoire The latter years of the seventeenth century saw a series of calls for a complete account of England’s history from the Roman invasion to the present, which would be able to rival both in quality and scale the work of Livy.1 Initial attempts at such an endeavour were made by, among others, John Milton, William Temple and Jonathan Swift, while more substantial accounts emerged from Robert Brady and James Tyrrell, both of whom reached Richard II.2 A success, of sorts, was

in Commerce, finance and statecraft