Search results

Open Access (free)
Fixing the past in English war films
Fred Inglis

its high-walled gardens; the other three were killed. Thompson broke protocol by running forward to the Sherman under rifle fire, to call down into the turret. He received no answer. It was a tiny exploit in that formal operation, the liberation of Perugia, itself part of the larger victory in Italy and, ultimately, the victory in Europe. But Thompson’s memoir goes beyond the

in British cinema of the 1950s
Emma Wilson

’. 29 ‘Because they have short memories, people accumulate numerous aide- mémoires’. 30 ‘in front of their morsels of universal memory’. 31 ‘the less memory is lived from the inside, the more it needs exterior supports and tangible marks of an existence which

in Alain Resnais
Emma Wilson

, Deleuze writes: ‘il y a deux mémoires encore, chacune marquée par une guerre, Boulogne, I’ Algérie’ (Deleuze 1985 : 154). 24 Benayoun also makes a comparison between the films, describing Boulogne as a Aille reconstruite, à la fois ancienne et moderne, où le passé et l’avenir précaire se mêlent inextricablement, comme Nevers et Hiroshima dans un film précédent’ (Benayoun 2002 : 132). 25 As she arrives in Boulogne

in Alain Resnais
Derek Paget

reliability of Sandford’s research in Cathy but also about his reliability in general. I believe these caveats traduce his memory. The cause – in the academy at any rate – was academics’ excessive reliance on Irene Shubik’s 1975 ­memoir Play For Today: The Evolution of Television Drama. My article about all this in New Theatre Quarterly (Paget, 1999) attempts to show the ways in which I believe Shubik to be untrustworthy on Cathy (her book’s 2000 reprint unfortunately perpetuates most of her own inaccuracies). It also argues that Shubik-inspired academic commentary has

in No other way to tell it
Abstract only
David Murphy and Patrick Williams

Jordan. In his memoir Out of Place , Said paints a very unflattering picture of ‘VC-Cairo’, where he and Omar Sharif (in his earlier incarnation as Michel Shalhoub) were students, being decidedly unimpressed by the English as either teachers or moral examples (Said 1999 ). In Alexandria … Why? , Chahine in turn shows the staff as very happy to applaud his performance of speeches from Hamlet , but totally resistant to allowing him any sort of

in Postcolonial African cinema
David Murphy and Patrick Williams

his life. In Laurence Gavron’s fascin ating documentary, Ninkinanka, le Prince de Colobane (1991), Mambety’s father describes how his son wrote compulsively as a child in an attempt ‘to understand the world’. Mambety was a passionate film fan from his teenage years, and he was a member of a Dakar film club in which he gained a broad knowledge of world cinema. As his friend Nar Sène recalls in his memoir on Mambety, theirs

in Postcolonial African cinema
Abstract only
Victoria Best and Martin Crowley

spectacular success is inseparable from their use of sexually explicit material: Catherine Millet and Virginie Despentes. The governing aesthetics of the two are diametrically opposed: despite presenting a graphic memoir, Millet wishes to maintain a properly aesthetic distance from her reader, whereas Despentes’ writing seeks to get as close as possible to the often seedy world it describes. They are joined, however, by the failure they

in The new pornographies
From Le Raïd to Jeunesse dorée
Carrie Tarr

). Benguigui’s Inch ’ Allah dimanche , set in the town of St-Quentin in the North of France (where Benguigui grew up), is also loosely inspired by her mother (and offers a more complex representation of Maghrebi families in the provinces than the films discussed in chapter 9 ). After interviewing various Maghrebi women for the second part of her documentary tryptich, Mémoires d ’ immigrés (1998), Benguigui, who had been ashamed of her mother as a child, realised

in Reframing difference
Queen Victoria, photography and film at the fin de siècle
Ian Christie

portraying royal ceremonial was advancing. The best known of these comes from the memoir by the pioneer producer Cecil Hepworth, who had positioned three cameras along the route of Victoria’s funeral procession. He operated one of the cameras, positioning himself inside the railings of Grosvenor Gardens, opposite Victoria station. As the procession approached, headed by the new King, Edward, Hepworth began

in The British monarchy on screen
Mandy Merck

Deardon, 1959) or exploitation ( Flame in the Streets , Roy Ward Baker, 1961). The name Crawford is itself an allusion to 1950, the year when the former nanny of Elizabeth and Margaret, Marion Crawford or ‘Crawfie’, outraged the royal family by publishing her memoir The Little Princesses . But the ease with which Mr Crawford converses with his sovereign also suggests the ethnic ‘diversity’ championed in

in The British monarchy on screen