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Christian Kaunert

agreements concluded with third countries, which it described as ‘a basis for political dialogue and a tool for EU external action’ (Council, 2004, p. 7). The external dimension of the EU counter-terrorism policy represents an important element in the possible construction of an Area of Freedom, Security and Justice, as making the EU secure depends at least to some extent on successful co-operation with

in European internal security
Heikki Patomäki

its rituals of enemy construction. Quite innocently, his judgement may have been made in his capacity as a legal scholar (between 1949 and 1977, Boutros-Ghali was professor of international law and international relations at Cairo University) and an international civil servant aiming at impartiality, but that excuse was unavailable to the US and the UK. Third principle: US foreign policy should

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Ian Bellany

not be relied on). While the Baruch Plan, as we maintain, can be thought of as a blueprint for future US anti-proliferation policy, its immediate practical US policy on non-proliferation and the NPT 133 impact was virtually zero. A possible exception was that its failure to have an impact in the sense of actually establishing a system of international control of nuclear energy removed any doubts in the UK about proceeding on a national basis to develop nuclear weapons. Atoms for Peace on the other hand did leave a tangible legacy, but one that has been widely

in Curbing the spread of nuclear weapons
Abstract only
The politics of everyday life
Cillian McGrattan and Elizabeth Meehan

programme, a new public culture, reform of the police and justice systems, decommissioning and demilitarisation changed the context of everyday life. Institutions to promote human rights, equality and political inclusion and to encourage North-South and East-West (Ireland-UK) cooperation – the Human Rights Commission and the Equality Commission as well as the North-South Ministerial Council

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
Open Access (free)
Reflections in a distorting mirror
Christoph Zürcher

outlines of a European (global?) security landscape must be found or will be lost. Prologue 1230 hours, 24 March 1999: NATO airfields in Italy and the United Kingdom Eight American B-52 bombers, each carrying twenty cruise missiles in its bomb bay, leave their UK base in Fairford and head towards Serbia. From NATO airfields Aviano and Istrano in Italy

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Open Access (free)
Kosovo and the outlines of Europe’s new order
Sergei Medvedev and Peter van Ham

Europe’s political space. Clearly, these events can also be read in a less positive manner, as testifying to Western arrogance, an over-reliance on the efficacy of high-technology and a lack of long-term visions and policies of peaceful engagement. But, however one wants to interpret ‘Kosovo’, it is certainly clear that political spin-doctors have been highly successful in selling this war/conflict, and that Western public

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Civilisation, civil society and the Kosovo war
Mikkel Vedby Rasmussen

politics’ because they (are supposed to) act in a conforming manner and do not present each other with an ‘other’ which needs to be resisted and contested. Following Huntington’s logic, this suggests that within each civilisation there is a relatively good chance of peace. This interpretation explains Huntington’s rather peculiar conjecture that Africa is the only continent without a distinctive

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Ian Bellany

security involvement in the areas concerned. An example of what is meant here is the emergence of the South East Asian, African and the (failed) Korean nuclear-free zones in the half decade after the ending of the Cold War. Secondly, preventive is about discouraging nuclear additions to the complex of great powers. The logic here, as we Nuclear weapons and international security 53 have seen, may be dubious in its own terms but, in conjunction with the pre-emptive objective, the fewer the nuclearised great powers, the smaller will be the degree of unavoidable security

in Curbing the spread of nuclear weapons
Ian Bellany

promising stationary wall, the Netherlands collaborates with the UK and Germany in the multinational Urenco centrifuge plant, and apartheid South Africa openly worked on the stationary wall method. Legitimate interest in uranium enrichment can be found in places where: enriched uranium is the preferred reactor fuel, and that is now Nuclear weapons and nuclear energy 23 almost everywhere that has a nuclear power programme; the total installed nuclear capacity is high; and national reliance on nuclear power is great enough for considerations of reliability of fuel supply

in Curbing the spread of nuclear weapons
Life in a religious subculture after the Agreement
Gladys Ganiel and Claire Mitchell

in Africa, Asia and Latin America (Jenkins, 2002 ; Noll, 2009 ). Most scholarship on evangelicalism, even in these varied contexts, has defined it in terms of beliefs. But it is necessary to move beyond the conception of evangelicalism in terms of beliefs, as demonstrated by Christian Smith’s ( 1998 ) work on American evangelicalism. Smith shows that evangelicalism also relies on

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict