, which provides a welldocumented capsule of the basic conditions of early and mid-nineteenth-century Ireland: here rural change, population growth and emigration were each well-recorded. Over much of Ireland, population pressures operated on local circumstances, in which there were few mechanisms to accommodate the expanding population. West Cork and North Tipperary 137 The failure of industrialisation in most of Ireland became a central theme in the migration narrative. Equally vital was the character of agricultural change, which induced severely rational

in The genesis of international mass migration

6 The North American theatre The pioneers North America was the earliest and the greatest theatre of oceanic emigration in which the methods of mass migration were pioneered. The activation of the transatlantic human transfusions was a vast project and many of its origins remain a mystery. But it began as a largely English venture. Mostly, the story of the peopling of America is told as variants on the theme of the dispeopling of old Europe: it is told conventionally as the ‘uprooting’ or the ‘transplanting’ of Europe’s poor and wretched. This fits in well with

in The genesis of international mass migration

16 British emigration and the Malthus model Spanning the transition The life of Robert Malthus (1766–1834) spanned the decades in Britain of the rapid transition towards mass international migration. This became manifest only towards the end of his life. He was keenly aware of the extraordinary reproductive feats of the American colonists and the potential of new lands in the colonies. He was also well-informed about the substantial migrations from particular regions of the British Isles at the end of the old century. But Malthus was not much engaged with the

in The genesis of international mass migration

4 Migration, cosmopolitanism and ‘global citizenship’ from the 1990s The quest for ‘lifestyle’ in two generations I exist now in a state of limbo. I’ve lived in New Zealand for nearly four years, which my Wellington friends assure me is no time at all. I still have an English accent and gravitate without intention to other English people. But I don’t feel English any more. I don’t read the English news or support England against New Zealand in sport. I knew more about the All Blacks than I did about the British Lions on their recent tour, but I’m still not a

in Migrants of the British diaspora since the 1960S

problems of demobilisation, veterans’ discontent, industrial regeneration and chronic unemployment. Moreover, the failure of the British government to launch a successful domestic colonisation scheme also had a direct bearing on the implementation of this empire migration project. The outbreak of war effectively ended imperial migration for the next five years. ‘Of course everything here is all war and

in Unfit for heroes

4883 Social Change PT bjl.qxd 1111 2 3 4 15 6 7 8 9 10 1 112 1113 4 5 6 7 8 9 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 40111 13/6/07 11:07 Page 57 4 Emigration and migration They went across the fields at six o’clock this morning, they are in America long ago. (Tipperary boy, 1890s, asked about his sisters1) How many and where? The alarming figures have been so often repeated that we are in danger of taking them for granted: in 1890 there were 3 million Irish people living outside of Ireland and 40 per cent of all Irish-bybirth people in the world were

in Social change and everyday life in Ireland 1850–1922

93 3 The empire of the mind and medical migration It is important, in order to understand how the NHS and British general practice were able to draw on the labour of South Asian doctors, to appreciate, as was shown in the previous chapter, how British immigration and medical registration policies remained defined by imperial legacies for much of this period. It is also crucial to appreciate that these legacies continued to shape medicine in the Indian subcontinent and the thought processes of doctors—​as is apparent in their oral history interviews and in

in Migrant architects of the NHS

Introduction From the mid-nineteenth century through to the First World War, the Jewish world was re-shaped by mass migration resulting from a combination of factors – demographic and economic as well as the impact of persecution and discrimination. It was a part of a wider global shift in population from south to north and east to west that reflected the (uneven) impact of a new economic age and the forces of modernity that accompanied it. It is, however, especially the movement of

in Anglo-Jewry since 1066
Abstract only

plane with weary familiarity.1 The chief executive of the airport is also Irish: Declan Collier took up the post in 2012, having previously managed the Dublin Airport Authority (Sibun 2012). Each of the people I encountered has their own story – their own reasons for migrating, their own experiences of migration. The book has highlighted this diversity of migrant experiences, ranging from highly skilled to undocumented workers, from new religious communities to Conclusion 147 separated families, from citizens to asylum seekers. These experiences are linked together

in Ireland and migration in the twenty-first century
Abstract only

1 Introduction Ireland is a place profoundly shaped by migration. In A Book of Migrations, her wonderful travel account, Rebecca Solnit uses Ireland as a site to reflect on the meaning of identity and place. She describes Ireland as ‘a good place to think about it all’ because of its long history of migration, where ‘tides of invasion, colonization, emigration, exile, nomadism and tourism’ have all shaped the country (Solnit 1998: 6–7). Solnit moves around Ireland, expecting to find a ‘homogenous, predictable, familiar world’, but instead reaching a state of

in Ireland and migration in the twenty-first century