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Abstract only
Heike Wieters

world is again confronted with a situation that many might have hoped belonged in the past. Hundreds of thousands of people fleeing war, political instability, terror, poverty, and hunger in Syria, Libya, and the north of Africa are currently trying to find refuge in Europe. With European governments struggling to respond properly, it falls once again to private initiative to tackle this humanitarian

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

civilization was judged with reference to religion, technological development, ascribed racial characteristics, economic capacity, political institutions, morality, intellectual competence, and sense of nationhood. 36 Towards the end of the nineteenth century the religious and racial aspects lapsed and emphasis was put on the other ‘minimum standards of civilization’ and in this sense the standard opened the way for the inclusion of Japan and other non-Christian and non

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Just war and against tyranny
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

bellum (when resorting to war is justified and just) but later included jus in bello (appropriate conduct in the use of force). The idea of a just war can be seen as a middle road between the tradition of Realpolitik , which regards moral dilemmas and the ethics of war as irrelevant in international politics, and the alternative world view of pacifism. According to this middle road, war is deplorable but under certain circumstances justified and necessary as a last

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
A historiography
Eric James and Tim Jacoby

close to the chivalric orders before them ( Slim 2001b , p. 335). Discussed later in detail, these early modern (“classical”) humanitarians relied heavily on their independence from the political-military concerns around them and on maintaining the understanding that they would not speak out against what they witnessed. By the First World War

in The military-humanitarian complex in Afghanistan
Abstract only
Overview of conflict and assistance from 2001 to 2014
Eric James and Tim Jacoby

strategy and ongoing insecurity. Second, the characteristics of the war, the insurgency and the “coherent” combination of aid and force will be discussed. Third, political developments will be analyzed. The aid architecture that arose following the Taliban will be examined and located with donor imperatives, state-building objectives and development programming. Finally, it will be

in The military-humanitarian complex in Afghanistan
An emplaced approach
Madeleine Leonard

attacks on the whole community, rather than attacks on individuals. Presenting a spatial profile of conflict-related deaths in Belfast, Shirlow and Murtagh ( 2006 ) calculate that between 1969 and 2004 one third of the victims of politically motivated violence were murdered within 250 metres of an interface area. When the spatial gaze is widened to within 500 metres of interface areas, the proportion of

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Everyday life in interface areas
Madeleine Leonard

chapter, along with ongoing residential and educational segregation, impact on how young people perceive and use space. The various symbols are seen as powerful markers of political, cultural and religious identity. They enhance spatial separation, and the accompanying absence of everyday contact between the inhabitants of interface areas facilitates a lack of knowledge about the ‘out-group’. In the

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Heike Wieters

Expanding the firm – the promise and peril of scale [F]ew business and political leaders had a truly global outlook, one of a world without significant borders, until the 1980s. […] Few understood how treating the world as a single marketplace both for sourcing and producing

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

the publicists supportive of armed humanitarian intervention, forty-eight claimed a right to intervene in exceptional circumstances only and fourteen invoked moral or political reasons. There is also a substantial minority against any such legal or moral right: thirty-eight publicists (that is, 38 per cent of the total) (see table 4.1 ). 21 To make our presentation as lucid as possible, we will divide our material into five periods, from the 1830s until

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Madeleine Leonard

future adults or members of the next generation and argues that children should be viewed as ‘human beings’ rather than as ‘human becomings’ (Qvortrup, 1994 ). Hence, their lives in the here and now should be prioritised. While there has been a burgeoning amount of research on the social, economic, political and cultural causes and manifestations of the conflict in Northern Ireland, children’s and young

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast