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Graham Harrison

-narrative of British politics shifted to crisis and austerity. In 2010, New Labour was replaced by a Coalition Government of Conservative and Liberal Democrats, in which the former were dominant. This election outcome removed a key institutional relationship that development campaigners had come to rely on: a ruling party that shared many of the development norms of the campaign organisations themselves. Nevertheless, in 2013 a major national development campaign coalition was once again devised: the Enough Food If campaign (EFIF). This chapter

in Britain and Africa in the twenty-first century
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Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz and Julian Cooper

Bacon 02 3/2/06 10:06 AM Page 22 2 The security forces In this chapter we introduce the role in Russian political life of the siloviki (that is, personnel from the ‘force structures’ or ‘power ministries’, chiefly the security services, the armed forces, and the Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD)).1 We critically analyse the degree to which the Putin administration has acted to boost the role of the force structures in Russia in the public space, by which primarily we mean political life and civil society, concluding that the picture is not so

in Securitising Russia
Andrew Williams

and peoples in the common pursuit of wealth and prosperity. In the nineteenth century this was the main impulse behind both the political and economic liberalism that came together in the astonishing spread of capitalism across Europe and beyond.2 Arguably, such a combined liberalism became, and remains, the motor behind a post-Enlightenment cosmopolitanism, one that has brought the world into a modern age in a whirlwind of social engineering and that has swept away traditional structures and, some would argue, virtues. The NWO project has at its core a liberal

in Failed imagination?
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Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz and Julian Cooper

Bacon 08 3/2/06 10:37 AM Page 177 8 Conclusion Throughout this book we have analysed a number of different aspects of Russia today through the prism of security. Using the securitisation approach developed in the sphere of international relations1 we have considered contemporary Russian domestic policies in relation to Chechen separatism, the media, terrorism, religion, political parties, nationalism, migration, and the economy. Although there are of course connections between these policy areas – some more so than others – each chapter can be read on its

in Securitising Russia
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Germany in American post-war International Relations
Felix Rösch

led to this ‘silencing’. How was it possible that their German intellectual socialisation that continued to inform their political thought became overlooked and indeed no longer even realised? It is argued that German émigrés and American International Relations (IR) constitute a case of successful integration. Before this argument is further expounded, it has to be acknowledged that émigré scholars partly caused this silencing themselves. After their forced emigration, they were at pains to adjust their research and teaching to the different intellectual and

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
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Stephen Emerson and Hussein Solomon

4 Failing states States are the only contemporary political organizations that enjoy a unique legal status under international law—sovereignty—and are deemed to possess an exclusive monopoly on the legitimate use of force within their borders. While the modern nation-state† has existed for more than 350 years, states today are much more varied in their capacity, capability, and composition than ever before. They are also more numerous than they were half a century ago, and the range of their population sizes, physical endowments, wealth, productivity, delivery

in African security in the twenty-first century
Edwin Borchard between New Haven and Berlin
Jens Steffek and Tobias Heinze

great scepticism towards all narratives of linear progress and civilisation. Together with the refugees, German ideas travelled across the Atlantic that were congenial to realist attitudes, prominently Max Weber’s sociology of domination and Carl Schmitt’s agonistic conception of politics. These biographical and intellectual pathways were important, but we contend that they represent just one side of realism’s German connection. In this chapter we reveal a somewhat darker legacy. We show how reactionary Americans and German revisionists, in particular law scholars

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
The changing view of Germany in Anglo-American geopolitics
Lucian Ashworth

On 30 April 1945, American troops entered Munich. Amongst other things, Munich was known to British and American political geographers and strategic studies experts as the home of the Institut für Geopolitik . The Institut was the publisher of the Zeitschrift für Geopolitik that was edited by a professor at the University named Karl Haushofer. For the last four years of the war, Haushofer had come to be seen as the éminence grise of the Nazi regime. He even made it into popular culture. The Oscar-nominated American film Plan for Destruction (1943

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
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Ahmad H. Sa’di

within Palestinian society 06_Ahmad_Ch-5.indd 93 8/20/2013 2:14:23 PM MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/20/2013, SPi 94 thorough surveillance at the community level. Thus, a systematic collection of data on Palestinian villages began as early as the 1930s, and by the end of the same decade, an archive was completed. It included ‘[p]recise details ... about the topographic location of each village, its access roads, quality of land, water springs, main sources of income, its socio-political composition, religious affiliations, names of its mukhtars (local leaders

in Thorough surveillance
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Aspects of continuity and change after New Labour
Danielle Beswick, Jonathan Fisher and Stephen R. Hurt

refused to sign the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) between the EU and the East African Community, with officials citing Brexit as one of the key reasons (Hurt, 2016 ). At the same time, and as Part II of this volume demonstrates, a range of UK actors – both inside and outside government – continue to portray and frame Africa in terms of development. Both Chapter 6 and Chapter 7 show how the two leading political Parties in the UK – the Conservative and Labour Parties – continue to privilege Africa in the way they frame their thinking

in Britain and Africa in the twenty-first century