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Abstract only
Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz, and Julian Cooper

Bacon 02 3/2/06 10:06 AM Page 22 2 The security forces In this chapter we introduce the role in Russian political life of the siloviki (that is, personnel from the ‘force structures’ or ‘power ministries’, chiefly the security services, the armed forces, and the Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD)).1 We critically analyse the degree to which the Putin administration has acted to boost the role of the force structures in Russia in the public space, by which primarily we mean political life and civil society, concluding that the picture is not so

in Securitising Russia
Andrew Williams

and peoples in the common pursuit of wealth and prosperity. In the nineteenth century this was the main impulse behind both the political and economic liberalism that came together in the astonishing spread of capitalism across Europe and beyond.2 Arguably, such a combined liberalism became, and remains, the motor behind a post-Enlightenment cosmopolitanism, one that has brought the world into a modern age in a whirlwind of social engineering and that has swept away traditional structures and, some would argue, virtues. The NWO project has at its core a liberal

in Failed imagination?
Abstract only
Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz, and Julian Cooper

Bacon 08 3/2/06 10:37 AM Page 177 8 Conclusion Throughout this book we have analysed a number of different aspects of Russia today through the prism of security. Using the securitisation approach developed in the sphere of international relations1 we have considered contemporary Russian domestic policies in relation to Chechen separatism, the media, terrorism, religion, political parties, nationalism, migration, and the economy. Although there are of course connections between these policy areas – some more so than others – each chapter can be read on its

in Securitising Russia
Abstract only
Stephen Emerson and Hussein Solomon

4 Failing states States are the only contemporary political organizations that enjoy a unique legal status under international law—sovereignty—and are deemed to possess an exclusive monopoly on the legitimate use of force within their borders. While the modern nation-state† has existed for more than 350 years, states today are much more varied in their capacity, capability, and composition than ever before. They are also more numerous than they were half a century ago, and the range of their population sizes, physical endowments, wealth, productivity, delivery

in African security in the twenty-first century
Abstract only
Ahmad H. Sa’di

within Palestinian society 06_Ahmad_Ch-5.indd 93 8/20/2013 2:14:23 PM MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/20/2013, SPi 94 thorough surveillance at the community level. Thus, a systematic collection of data on Palestinian villages began as early as the 1930s, and by the end of the same decade, an archive was completed. It included ‘[p]recise details ... about the topographic location of each village, its access roads, quality of land, water springs, main sources of income, its socio-political composition, religious affiliations, names of its mukhtars (local leaders

in Thorough surveillance
Stephen Emerson and Hussein Solomon

violence. This development presents an enormous political and socio-economic challenge for many African countries and organizations, which are already overburdened trying to cope with a whole host of new and diverse security threats besides terrorism. Moreover, this lack of state and institutional capacity is at times further overshadowed by an African wariness and lack of political will over what some see as an imported problem. Their fear is that the continent is once again becoming a battlefield for an ideological clash of civilizations not of Africa’s own making

in African security in the twenty-first century
Abstract only
Andrew Williams

-referential, in the process drawing on an ever smaller number of (usually American) gurus who have little regard for the longer-term currents of world history, even within their own culture. Yet the older traditions of international relations’ political and intellectual history are far too precious to be left to moulder away on the shelves of libraries. If this book has one good effect it will be to take the strain off borrowings of international relations theorists of the 1970s and 1980s and to put it back on to, especially, those writing between the 1920s and the 1940s. But

in Failed imagination?
Abstract only
Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz, and Julian Cooper

the general public – that particular policy areas are legitimate security concerns and therefore require special attention, oversight, and control. Beginning with the religion law of 1997, and progressing through laws on social organisations, political parties, extremists, migration, foreigners, the media, and political demonstrations, the Russian state has tightened up its control of civil society in recent years. In most of these cases there are sufficient regulations for the state to move with a clear legal basis against groups or individuals which might be

in Securitising Russia
Abstract only
The domestic politics of Putin

This book shows the impact of twenty-first-century security concerns on the way Russia is ruled. It demonstrates how President Vladimir Putin has wrestled with terrorism, immigration, media freedom, religious pluralism, and economic globalism, and argues that fears of a return to old-style authoritarianism oversimplify the complex context of contemporary Russia. Since the early 1990s, Russia has been repeatedly analysed in terms of whether it is becoming a democracy or not. This book instead focuses on the internal security issues common to many states in the early twenty-first century, and places them in the particular context of Russia, the world's largest country, still dealing with its legacy of communism and authoritarianism. Detailed analysis of the place of security in Russia's political discourse and policy making reveals nuances often missing from overarching assessments of Russia today. To characterise the Putin regime as the ‘KGB-resurgent’ is to miss vital continuities, contexts, and on-going political conflicts that make up the contemporary Russian scene. The book draws together current debates about whether Russia is a ‘normal’ country developing its own democratic and market structures, or a nascent authoritarian regime returning to the past. Drawing on extensive interviews and Russian source material, it argues that the growing security factor in Russia's domestic politics is neither ubiquitous nor unchallenged. It must be understood in the context of Russia's immediate history and the growing domestic security concerns of many states the world over.

Abstract only
Ahmad H. Sa’di

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/19/2013, SPi Concluding remarks Reflections on Israeli policies Israeli policies of population management, surveillance and political control described in this book had not been entirely known before. Scholars who previously wrote on state–minority relations were largely guessing in the dark; thus, their assumptions and biases might have found their ways to the models or narratives they composed. Two widely held theses in Israeli social sciences were disproved in the current study: the absence of a clear state policy towards the

in Thorough surveillance