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Association and distinction in politics and religion
Rodney Barker

3 Top people are different: association and distinction in politics and religion Association and distinction in the leadership of religion and politics In 1521 Martin Luther, appearing before the Diet of Worms, declared that he was bound ‘by the Scriptures to which I have appealed, and my conscience is taken captive by God's word, I cannot and will not recant anything, for to act against our conscience is neither safe for us, nor open to us.’ 1 It was a statement which illustrated the extreme contradictions involved in the

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

throwing flowers at the funeral cortege of Diana Princess of Wales. 10 The history of the population within the changing borders of the political communities of the British Isles is of continuous conflict and shifting relations between a democratic identity and a ruler's identity, with the latter slowly and unevenly distinguishing itself increasingly by its exceptional exemplification of the associative identity shared with those whom the ruler aspires to lead. It will illustrate the dual nature of identity cultivation, whereby on

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

character, and readers who prefer the story to the justification of the plot may want to leave chapter 2 until the end, or skip it entirely. The book has five principle themes, which are no more than abbreviations of well-established ideas not only in the social sciences and humanities, but in theology and political theory and, quite possibly, art and artistic theory. First, the identity paradox – the continual tension between identity as association with some broader group, ideology, or vision, and identity as distinctiveness by contrast within

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

identity and its associated meaning and justification are cultivated and expressed as a dimension of public action: language, dress, the choreography of government and of politics, and the shapes and sounds of social and public life. The physical, created dimensions of identity, from clothes to architecture, are not only the constructed material setting for action, but are also themselves public actions which cultivate, generate, and constitute social persons. To say that artefacts are part of identity is different from attributing purpose, character

in Cultivating political and public identity
Annedith Schneider

1 Politics and belonging in the music of Turkish-French rapper C-it In late July 2011, Michel Raison, a member of the French National Assembly, wrote to the Minister of Culture to suggest censoring ‘certains groupes de musique rap issus de l’immigration’ (certain rap groups of immigrant origin) (Raison 2011)1 because they were a threat to French democracy.2 As an editorialist in the newspaper Le Monde reminded readers, however, it was not young rappers in the banlieue who invented protest music. But previous generations of musicians who ridiculed the French

in Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home in France
Malcolm Chase

1 George Howell, the Webbs and the political culture of early labour history M alcolm Chase George Howell (1833–1910) was the epitome of a nineteenth-century auto­ didact, having received an indifferent education, largely part-time, that ended when he was twelve. Successively a ploughboy, apprentice shoemaker and from the age of twenty-two a bricklayer, he doggedly built a career in labour movement politics, first achieving public prominence as Secretary of the London Trades’ Council in 1861–62. He established a reputation as an exceptionally energetic

in Labour and working-class lives
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

’s political-economic theology of laissez faire. More particularly it resonates with evolutionary theory as it was taken up and developed by Herbert Spencer’s social Darwinism and subsequent socio-biology. It is worth noting in passing that contemporary zoology very significantly refutes the nineteenth-century notions that animals act as singular hunter-killers. Wolves 126 POLITICAL ECONOMY and lions and similar top predators, the heroes of ‘you eat what you kill’ mythology, are in fact gregarious social animals, they hunt cooperatively and they share what they kill. A

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
Abstract only
Karin Fischer

equal citizenship that Irish political leaders claim as their own in the name of their republican ideals. Beyond the issue of the overall place of cultural and religious Catholicism, the current denominational structure of the Irish education system, with the legal imposition of particular religious orientations in schools, runs contrary to the new educational methods founded on intercultural and child-centred principles that have made some headway in Irish schools. The most telling illustration is probably the fact that religion classes and religious rituals in 208

in Schools and the politics of religion and diversity in the Republic of Ireland
Jose López Mazz

This article will describe the contemporary scientific techniques used to excavate and identify the dead bodies of disappeared detainees from the Uruguayan dictatorship. It will highlight the developments that have led to increased success by forensic anthropologists and archaeologists in uncovering human remains, as well as their effects, both social and political, on promoting the right to the truth and mechanisms of transitional justice.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Louise Zamparutti

This essay analyses the literature on the foibe to illustrate a political use of human remains. The foibe are the deep karstic pits in Istria and around Trieste where Yugoslavian Communist troops disposed of Italians they executed en masse during World War II. By comparing contemporary literature on the foibe to a selection of archival reports of foibe exhumation processes it will be argued that the foibe literature popular in Italy today serves a political rather than informational purpose. Counterpublic theory will be applied to examine how the recent increase in popular foibe literature brought the identity of the esuli, one of Italy‘s subaltern counterpublics, to the national stage. The paper argues that by employing the narrative structure of the Holocaust, contemporary literature on the foibe attempts to recast Italy as a counterpublic in the wider European public sphere, presenting Italy as an unrecognised victim in World War II.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal