My life in fanzines
Clare Wadd

was always about being part of something. We took the inclusive anyone-can-do-it ethos of punk rock and fanzines into running what was ultimately a very successful record label, and which operated and supported us for eight years. We priced records cheaply, crammed lots of tracks on, didn’t do limited editions or special versions, and exchanged huge numbers of letters with our record-buying public – many of whom also wrote fanzines, ran record labels, were in bands, or otherwise part of this whole thing. The whole point was that there was no divide between us as

in Ripped, torn and cut
Popular music
Sean Campbell and Gerry Smyth

marked increase in popular music-making activities across Northern Ireland. An unforeseen consequence of the Miami Showband massacre had been an expansion of domestic music making, with local bands filling the vacuum left by the de facto touring boycott of more established international acts.9 At precisely the same time, moreover, the empowering ‘do it yourself’ ethos of punk was convincing many youngsters in Northern Ireland to write songs that engaged with their own everyday lives. Punk in Northern Ireland: from ‘Alternative Ulster’ to ‘utter escapism’ The emergence

in Northern Ireland after the troubles
Against the corporate voice
Caroline Coon

that I consciously wrote about as the punk movement in the summer of 1976 were unskilled or musically unambitious or playing ‘dumb’. Of the musicians in the first British ‘punk’ groups I mentioned in the various strands of my punk narrative – the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned – most of them were as musically accomplished and ambitious as it is possible for teenagers to be. Others, like Johnny Rotten and Paul Simonon, were culturally educated and aware art students. What I saw and heard in these young musicians was what I had been schooled to recognise

in Working for the clampdown
Abstract only
Popular song in the films of Pedro Almodóvar
Eric M. Thau

Since his films were first analysed in the early 1980s, Pedro Almodóvar’s use of music has been duly noted as an essential element of his filmic vision. Indeed, his intimate, even emblematic participation in la movida , Madrid’s countercultural liberal arts movement of the late 1970s, signalled the close association between music and a punk/kitsch attitude toward cultural markers of all kinds

in Screening songs in Hispanic and Lusophone cinema
Critical mass, collective effervescence, social networks and social space
Nick Crossley

4 Theorising micro-mobilisation: critical mass, collective effervescence, social networks and social space In the previous chapter I suggested that whatever strains, inspirations, opportunities and personalities may have played a role in punk’s emergence, a full explanation must focus upon its micro-mobilisation context. In this chapter I take a first step towards doing this by outlining a theory of micro-mobilisation which, I will argue in the next chapter, explains the emergence of punk in London between late 1975 and the end of 1976. My argument is that

in Networks of sound, style and subversion
Ian Goodyer

covered some ‘2,000 miles on the road’.8 RAR could also claim the support of many of the most innovative musical acts of the time, including the Tom Robinson Band, Sham 69, Steel Pulse, Aswad, the Members, X-Ray Spex, Stiff Little Fingers, the Specials and the Clash. Through its slogan, ‘Reggae, Soul, Rock and Roll, Jazz, Funk and Punk: Our Music’,9 RAR declared its intention to deny popular music to the forces of the far-right, but although a multiplicity of styles were represented at their events it is clear from the concert line-ups that punk, ‘new wave’ and reggae

in Crisis music
Abstract only
Ian Goodyer

cultural experimentation in the early twentieth century. But besides this debt to older antecedents, RAR seized on contemporary developments in popular culture, including the two musical forms that became most closely identified with RAR: punk rock and reggae. After spending a lengthy period in relative obscurity, RAR’s leading role in the anti-racist mobilisations of the 1970s has become more widely recognised in recent years. Dave Renton’s history of the AntiNazi League (ANL), When We Touched the Sky,2 Alan Miles’s documentary film, Who Shot the Sheriff?,3 and the work

in Crisis music
Dean Lockwood

outcome’ (142). Attali’s observations coincided with the emergence of British post-punk music. My focus here is on the band Throbbing Gristle (typically abbreviated as ‘TG’) who created what they called ‘industrial’ music. TG, formed in 1975, originated as the musical incarnation of the performance art group, COUM Transmissions. Initially conceived as a

in Monstrous media/spectral subjects
Abstract only
Post-punk worlds as networks
Nick Crossley

9 Joining the dots: post-punk worlds as networks In the previous chapter I introduced the post-punk worlds of Manchester, Liverpool and Sheffield, as they were in the final years of the 1970s, and I offered a preliminary analysis of them. In the present chapter I develop this analysis by way of an examination of their formal network properties (most of whose definitions were introduced in earlier chapters, especially Chapters 1 and 5). The analysis is motivated by a number of key concerns. First, I want to see how well my earlier arguments regarding the

in Networks of sound, style and subversion
Abstract only
Lisa Shaw and Rob Stone

(To Return, 2006). His appreciation of Almodóvar’s selection of popular songs and their impact (both diegetic and non-diegetic) on the plot, characters and mood of his films includes analysis of punk, folksong, boleros and world music, and prompts an analysis of how these songs offer the filmmaker an opportunity to advance the romantic ironies inherent in his films. In building his argument, Thau demonstrates how these songs

in Screening songs in Hispanic and Lusophone cinema