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A counterfactual ghost story
Damian Walford Davies

likely always remain a matter of speculation. The time is the summer of 1816; the place is Thelwall’s home and elocutionary institution at 57 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London. There, far from the famous ‘haunted summer’ on the shores of Lake Geneva, a real-life gothic romance is taking shape, as the fate of a successful professional and buried radical is being sealed by the death of a loyal partner, the lure of a Lolita pupil and betrayal by a second-self son. Thelwall’s truth will never shine as bright as Mary Shelley’s fiction, but the former shaped the latter and still

in Counterfactual Romanticism
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Laurent Curelly and Nigel Smith

novels. They found fault with contemporary novels glossing over truth and using ornament as a truth-distorting device, this being associated with Burke and conservative politics. In return, they had an embryonic stylistic programme for their novels which rejected the conventional style of such highly popular and marketable publications as sentimental novels and gothic romances. Marion Leclair then examines the three novelists’ treatment of plot and shows them to challenge the conventional types of plot – romantic, picaresque and gothic – which they levelled from a

in Radical voices, radical ways
From Madonna to Ally McBeal
Geraldine Harris

exaggerated performances. It also draws heavily on the structures and images of classical mythology and on the ‘feminine’ genres of melodrama, fairytale and gothic romance. Although this is achieved intertextually and in the register of parody and pastiche, as with the earlier adaptation of Weldon’s The Life and Loves of a She Devil (1986),3 this drama very much repeats classical notions of the irrational, ‘monstrous’, supernatural feminine. As such character is rendered in terms of archetypes that owe much to Jungian psychoanalysis and are defined in terms of one or two

in Beyond representation
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History and the Gothic in the eighteenth century
Jonathan Dent

and that they viewed (Gothic) romance as an alternative mode of historiography. Although there is a complex interplay between Enlightenment strategies of historical representation and the Gothic, the links between historians and Gothic writers uncovered in Sinister Histories reveal that the genre is frequently hostile towards such representations of the past. While acknowledging instances where

in Sinister histories
Sophia Lee’s The Recess (1783–85), the Gothic and history
Jonathan Dent

). Exploiting the obscurity and uncertainty of the historical record and focusing on the villain’s (Elizabeth’s) persecution of a helpless female protagonist (Mary), Lee shows how women are essentially imprisoned within male codes of historical representation. Exploiting the Gothic’s identification of the past as a site of conflict and transferring the figure of Mary from history to the realm of Gothic romance

in Sinister histories
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Julia M. Wright

Wheatley usefully refocuses the problem that “television [is] too ‘literal’” to address the domestic emphasis of televisual realism and argue that the gothic responds to “domestic form,” suggestively echoing the understanding of nineteenth-century sensation fiction as the “mixture of contemporary domestic realism with elements of the Gothic romance.” 5 Wheatley’s emphasis on

in Men with stakes
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David Annwn Jones

Casket Girls: A Modern Gothic Vampire Ballet’ and Northern Ballet’s and Mark Bruce Company’s productions of Dracula seem at different ends of the dance spectrum. Matthew Bourne’s adaptation Sleeping Beauty, a Gothic Romance received mixed reviews. There are also more intimate and small-scale productions: Gothic burlesque (for example ‘Emilie Autumn and the Bloody Crumpets’), and belly

in Gothic effigy
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David Annwn Jones

condition that covered his face and body in a thick coat of hair, became part of Margaret of Parma’s cabinet in Antwerp. In Jack Sheppard (1839–40), one of Harrison Ainsworth’s ‘Newgate novels’ (a literary hybrid of historical and Gothic romances), Sir Rowland Trenchard stumbles on a particularly macabre cabinet: On

in Gothic effigy
Fred Botting

natural wildness emerging in an age of civic humanism, bourgeois morality and enlightened rationality. Gothic romances, like the ruins, old and new, littering fictional and actual landscapes, serve as bobbins on strings, cast away and pulled back in the differentiation between modern culture and its dark precursor. If the throwing away of feudal beliefs, customs and trappings testifies to the moral and

in Limits of horror
British flora and the ‘fair daughters of Albion’
Sam George

Smith’s. Plumptre may well have had Smith in mind again when he has his female botanist, Veronica (who has already fantasised about writing a gothic romance with a botanising heroine), recite a poem she has written entitled ‘The Triumph of Botany’. The poem (said to be in twenty cantos) shares the theme of Flora descending to earth in a carriage, the subject of Smith’s Darwin-inspired poem, ‘Flora’, and

in Botany, sexuality and women’s writing 1760–1830