Martin D. Moore

s and 1970s, and the DHSS and MRC had engaged with questions about drug safety. 2 However, there was little in the way of concerted government programmes or interventions. This changed considerably in the 1980s. The volume of parliamentary discussion increased greatly, as technological innovations and concerns about complications became subject to debate and the limitations of NHS resources. 3 In part, this chapter argues, the reappearance of diabetes was predicated upon networks of exchange developed over the post-war period. For instance

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
Sarah Hale, Will Leggett and Luke Martell

investment. The New Labour Government argues that PPP–PFI ‘works best’. Shaw, however, argues that there is little substance to the British Government’s claim that the PFI is, on pragmatic grounds, the most effective way of renewing the capital infrastructure of the NHS. There must be other reasons for the Government’s preference for private sector involvement. The alleged pragmatism

in The Third Way and beyond
Martin D. Moore

Over the four decades that followed the creation of the NHS, British diabetes management slowly spread outside the hospital. During the late 1940s and the 1950s, clinicians first co-operated with local government public health doctors to extend the reach of surveillance and education. From the late 1960s onwards, GPs assumed roles as co-ordinators and providers of care in the community, developing systems of disease management on their own and in collaboration with specialists. Although individual GPs moved into diabetes care for a range of

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
Abstract only
Ruth Holliday, Meredith Jones and David Bell

patients are made into patient-consumers in the neoliberal private healthcare market, cost inevitably becomes a factor and the IMT market is born. This is a problem for domestic private healthcare companies whose profits depend on keeping patients in their home countries with their needs unmet by the state. It is this condition that means that international medical travel becomes a moral panic. On the one hand in the UK, the post-war deal between citizens who agree to pay taxes in return for state-provided healthcare (the NHS) has all but broken down, producing much

in Beautyscapes
Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, William Davies, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Emma Jackson and Roiyah Saltus

authority, all point to the locations of performative labour in these endeavours. We have understood the campaigns that we analysed as representing this range of tactical performances. Figure 2: Signs in NHS on limited rights to healthcare for some migrants Alongside focus groups, interviews and observations in our own

in Go home?
Abstract only
Alex Mold

the patientconsumer, progress was slow and problems remained even after the law had been changed. Moreover, the introduction of such legislation was representative of a deeper shift, as the rights and demands of individual patient-consumers came to the fore. Such rights were of greater importance in the more marketised NHS that was being developed from the late 1980s onwards. The role and purpose of information for patients became more narrowly conceived, so that information was put to use to help individuals make better choices, rather than being directed towards

in Making the patient-consumer
Peter Triantafillou and Naja Vucina

number of practising psychoanalysts and psychotherapists in Britain may be no more than 1,500 (British Psychoanalytic Council, 2017). While psychoanalysis may never have pervaded the treatment of mental illness in Britain as effectively as in the US or in France, it has not been unimportant either. Psychoanalytic treatment was formally accepted and entitled to financial support from the NHS as early as 1948 (O. Olsen and Køppe, 1996, p. 424). This support has sustained, for example, the still-​active Portman Clinic, which was opened in London in 1933 by the Institute

in The politics of health promotion
Abstract only
Jane M. Adams

hydrotherapy and massage, continue to be taught and practised in Britain, these treatments are considered to be part of physiotherapy rather than medicine and are no longer associated with natural waters. Despite this ambivalent endorsement by the National Health Service (NHS), some private developers are investing in spa centres focused on healing therapies as well as recreation. Plans to redevelop the crescent and natural baths at the once flourishing spa at Buxton will reinstate a thermal spa along with a visitor centre.3 This study was inspired by an assessment that

in Healing with water
Lord David Owen

us together is that we still agree on the overriding importance of reducing inequality and championing the ethical founding principles of the NHS. We used to agree on a federal United Kingdom, but now David has joined Plaid Cymru, I am not so sure. The first political essay we began writing together was in the late spring of 1967 with John Mackintosh, also a new Labour MP. Entitled ‘Change Gear’ it was published by Socialist Commentary as a fifteen-page pamphlet just before the Labour Party Autumn Conference at Scarborough in September 1967. It received an

in Making social democrats
Abstract only
Alex Mold

, the NHS provided universal access to health care that was free at the point of use, but the early health service was structured in such a way that there was no real mechanism for hearing the views of patients. Furthermore, a culture of paternalism existed within the medical profession perpetuating the view that ‘doctor knows best’ and patients should accept a largely passive role. Yet there were signs from the early 1960s onwards that such views were beginning to be challenged. As the journalist Gerda Cohen remarked in 1964, ‘patients are becoming impatient: of

in Making the patient-consumer