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Ben Jonson, Robert Chester, and the Vatum Chorus of Loves Martyr

miscellanies) and mine (printed verse miscellanies), in The Encyclopedia of English Renaissance Literature , ed. Alan Stewart and Garrett Sullivan (n. p.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012). For more comprehensive studies of the miscellany, see Elizabeth W. Pomeroy, The Elizabethan Miscellanies, Their Development and Conventions (Berkeley: University of California Press

in Formal matters
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Thomas Middleton, the book, and the genre of continuation

printed poems of The Hekatompathia in Liber Lilliati: Elizabethan Verse and Song. 34 See my chapter on Liber Lilliati and The Hekatompathia in Bound to Read: Compilations, Collections, and the Production of Renaissance Literature (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania

in Formal matters
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medical humoralism as a means of explaining mental and emotional processes, both those of Richard and early modern individuals more generally. For some recent critics of Renaissance literature and culture (and Shakespearian drama in particular), Richard’s comments might confirm the notion that humoral theory was the essential model for understanding the emotions in the period, rooting such phenomena in

in The Renaissance of emotion

. 3 William Empson, Essays on Renaissance Literature, vol. 1: Donne and the New Philosophy , ed. John Haffenden (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), p. 159. Further references will be included in the text. 4 Strier, The Unrepentant Renaissance

in The Renaissance of emotion

thematic focus but also in its address to a feminine audience (pp. 330–1). 16 Julia Reinhard Lupton finds in this convergence a premature effort on Chaucer’s part ‘to force a particular blossoming of secular literature in the interstices of hagiography’, an effort that would find more successful fruition in Boccaccio’s Decameron and Chaucer’s own Canterbury Tales; see Lupton, Afterlives of the Saints: Hagiography, Typology, and CONTZEN 9780719089701 PRINT (MAD0059) (G).indd 130 01/12/2014 15:34 Chaucer and hagiographic authority 131 Renaissance Literature (Stanford

in Sanctity as literature in late medieval Britain

Gillespie, Print Culture, p. 185.   9 Julia Reinhard Lupton, Afterlives of the Saints: Hagiography, Typology, and Renaissance Literature (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1996), p. xxi. 10 See James Simpson, Reform and Cultural Revolution, The Oxford English Literary History, Vol. 2: 1350–1547 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), esp. also pp. 47–50. 11 This is well known; see for example Pearsall, John Lydgate, esp. pp. 161–91; Larry Scanlon, ‘Lydgate’s Poetics: Laureation and Domesticity in the Temple of Glass’, in Scanlon and Simpson (eds), John Lydgate

in Sanctity as literature in late medieval Britain
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Building a woman’s house

rim is carved in the form of towers and battlements’. 35 Wells-Cole, Art and Decoration, pp. 269–70. 36 Sara L. French, ‘Replacing gender in Elizabethan gardens’, in Mapping Gendered Routes and Spaces in the Early Modern World, edited by Merry Wiesner-Hanks (Burlington: Ashgate Press, 2015), p. 171. Hardwick Hall: building a woman’s house 141 37 Henderson, Tudor House and Garden, pp. 86–7 and 206–7. 38 Wells-Cole, Art and Decoration, pp. 270–3. 39 Patricia Fumerton, Cultural Aesthetics: Renaissance Literature and the Practice of Social Ornament (Chicago

in Bess of Hardwick
Three lives of the chess-player in medieval and early-modern literature

explains the whole. “At this [story] every man laughed … for the lye.”’64 The story, that is, was well understood as parody, a temporary carnival space where that which was peripheral (India; Portugal; ape; at play) became the centre, reorienting the social landscape. These stories existed in a well-established lineage of similar stories – ‘a recurring motif [within Renaissance literature] in ape and monkey folk lore has to do with the animal’s ability to play chess, fetch wine from taverns, and do other feats s­ eemingly requiring the ability to reason’.65 The emphasis

in A cultural history of chess-players
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IBM’s Deep Blue and the Automaton Chess-Player, 1997–1769

: Springer, 2013), pp. 145–6, for a discussion of the evolution of the term artificial intelligence.  3 W. B. Hyman, ‘Introduction’, in W. B. Hyman (ed.), The Automaton in English Renaissance Literature (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011), p. 5.  4 Ibid., pp. 5–6.  5 M. Serres, Statues: The Second Book of Foundations, trans. R. Burks (London: Bloomsbury, 2015), pp. 1–4.  6 Ibid., p. 5.  7 S. During, Modern Enchantments: The Cultural Power of Secular Magic (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002), p. 1.  8 R. A. Gilbert, ‘David Brewster’, in G. Budge et al. (eds

in A cultural history of chess-players
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Kasparov and the machines

Daguerrean Mystique’, in G. Clarke (ed.), The Portrait in Photography (London: Reaktion, 1992), p. 185. Arthur’s tale had appeared in an article in Godey’s Lady Book in 1849. 41 See also Martin, Curious Visions, p. 90. 42 W. B. Hyman, ‘Introduction’, in W. B. Hyman (ed.), The Automaton in English Renaissance Literature (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011), p. 4. 43 Spooner, ‘Technologies’, p. 673. 44 Trachtenberg, ‘Likeness as Identity’, p. 185. 45 Ibid., p. 186. 46 Ibid. 47 G. McCool, ‘Say Good Knight, Garry’, Pittsburgh Post Gazette, 12 May 1997, p. 2. 48 R. Chandrasekaran

in A cultural history of chess-players