Open Access (free)
James Baldwin and the Broken Silences of Black Queer Men

James Baldwin writes within and against the testimonial tradition emerging from the Black Church, challenging the institution’s refusal to acknowledge the voices and experiences of black queer men. Baldwin’s autobiographical novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, creates a space for Baldwin’s testimony to be expressed, and also lays the foundation for a tradition of black queer artists to follow. In the contemporary moment, poet Danez Smith inhabits Baldwin’s legacy, offering continuing critiques of the rigidity of conservative Christian ideologies, while publishing and performing poetry that gives voice to their own experiences, and those of the black queer community at large. These testimonies ultimately function as a means of rhetorical resistance, which not only articulates black queer lives and identities, but affirms them.  

James Baldwin Review

the focus of missionary work in America’s Episcopal Church since at least the mid-1830s. 1 In Britain, Tractarianism helped Anglicans gain a clearer sense of the role, responsibilities and significance of the bishop. Political shifts – notably the gradual erosion of the old idea of a privileged establishment – also focused attention on the centrality of episcopacy for Anglican identity. For many Anglicans it

in An Anglican British World

Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic Chapter 6 Presbyterian ecclesiologies at the Westminster assembly Chad Van Dixhoorn ECCLESIASTICAL CONTEXTS T he Westminster assembly was in many ways the high point of the puritan experiment. The special morning service on 1 July 1643 saw the nave of Westminster Abbey thronged with supporters of a godly reformation. Long prayed-for alterations in worship, clarifications in doctrine and renovations in church government were finally within reach. While continuing reformation was to proceed on all three fronts

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66

6 The Bishop of Down and Connor and the established Church and state in Ireland, 1721–39 Despite a recent flurry of interest in the Church of Ireland clergy,1 as T. C. Barnard has pointed out, ‘the characteristics and functions of this profession can only be guessed until the origins, education, careers and wealth of its members have been clarified through prosopographical studies of particular cohorts of graduates and ordinands, and of individual dioceses’.2 The latter study would be particularly welcome in the case of the diocese of Down and Connor, upon

in Witchcraft and Whigs
The Welsh experience of church polity, 1640–60

Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic Chapter 4 ‘One of the least things in religion’: the Welsh experience of church polity, 1640–60 Stephen K. Roberts T he condition of the protestant ministry in Wales was considered as deplorable at the restoration of the monarchy as it had been on the eve of the civil war nearly twenty years previously, and the condition of Wales, both in social and religious terms, remained generally marginal to the concerns of successive regimes at Westminster. Yet controversy over the governance of the church in Wales was

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
Two-kingdoms theory, ‘Erastianism’ and the Westminster assembly debate on church and state, c. 1641–48

Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic Chapter 7 ‘They agree not in opinion among themselves’: two-kingdoms theory, ‘Erastianism’ and the Westminster assembly debate on church and state, c. 1641–48 Elliot Vernon1 I n 1659 Richard Baxter identified four parties to the previous decades’ dispute over church government: ‘the Episcopall, Presbyterians, Congregationall, [and] Erastian’.2 Despite its ubiquity in historical writing, the last of Baxter’s parties, the ‘Erastian’, was a recent neologism. Prior to the civil wars, English writers had

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
The importance of the covenant in Scottish presbyterianism, 1560–c. 1700

Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic Chapter 5 Polity, discipline and theology: the importance of the covenant in Scottish presbyterianism, 1560–c. 1700 R. Scott Spurlock W hilst some of the chapters in this volume focus on conceptions of church government and the use of the keys, the present chapter will discuss early modern Scottish presbyterian understandings of ecclesiology and who was understood to be the subject of the keys. A number of recent studies have demonstrated the fluidity of polity in seventeenth-century Britain, which is

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
The congregationalist divines and the establishment of church and magistrate in Cromwellian England

Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic Chapter 11 ‘Promote, protect, prosecute’: the congregationalist divines and the establishment of church and magistrate in Cromwellian England Hunter Powell 1 I t might be said that England’s attempt at a reformation of the national church in the 1640s failed because it was a British experiment. Forced by the need for a Scottish military alliance, it was derailed by clashing notions of the relationship between church and state within the divergent British traditions of church polity. By contrast, the effort to

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
Abstract only
Reading sacred space in late medieval England

glased. Goth up and doth yeur offerynge. Ye semeth half amased’.1 The Pardoner and his companions gaze ‘half amased’ upon the stained glass and, perhaps unsurprisingly given their status as the ‘lewdest’ pilgrims on the road to Canterbury, they are unsuccessful in deciphering the iconography. But crucially, they do try. Even men in a state of sin are conditioned by their pastoral instruction to read the stained glass and to interpret the architecture and symbols that surround them when they enter the medieval cathedral. The church building is at the heart of lay piety

in The church as sacred space in Middle English literature and culture
To what extent was Richard Baxter a congregationalist?

Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic Chapter 10 Polity and peacemaking: to what extent was Richard Baxter a congregationalist? Tim Cooper O n 17 July 1658 Edward Burton wrote a penitent letter to Richard Baxter in which he regretted ever allowing himself to believe, as he recently had, that Baxter’s church at Kidderminster was one of those ‘Congregated Churches in the Independent way’.1 In his reply, written a few days later, Baxter testily pointed out the absurdity of Burton’s error by listing six distinctive markers of ‘the Separatists and

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66